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Soulcrusher_X

Boss TU2, Korg Pitchblack, Buffers, Loop, WTF??

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Hey, I'm new to FX pedals, but I want to try out some to add some flavor to my tone. I'm thinking start simple, like a Wah, OD or boost, maybe a fuzz pedal and then at some point a delay, chorus or something else.

 

First, I need a good tuner, but I'm confused about which to buy. I see the Boss TU2 more than any other on stage, but I hear good things about the Korg Pitchblack. Then, I hear things about the Boss being good since it uses an internal buffer.

 

I'm kinda confused as to what the buffer is and if I would really need a pedal with one in my setup. I don't intend to have a million pedals out front, and the loop on my JSX has adjustable levels. Would I need a buffered pedal to prevent tone loss, or would the 3 or 4 pedals out front be fine without one?

 

Last, how do most of you guys link your FX in the chain? What do you put out front, what do you put in the loop, and what order works best for you? So far, I have a Dunlop wah to try out, I'm thinking of picking up a Bad Monkey for my OD/Boost and I need a pedal tuner.

 

Thanks in advance.

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i love my pitchblack. it has so many options, and i can see it perfectly on a dark stage. and while it is suppose to be good to have a buffer first in your chain my singal is no different from when i was using a DT10.

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I see the Boss TU2 more than any other on stage, but I hear good things about the Korg Pitchblack. Then, I hear things about the Boss being good since it uses an internal buffer.


I'm kinda confused as to what the buffer is and if I would really need a pedal with one in my setup. I don't intend to have a million pedals out front, and the loop on my JSX has adjustable levels. Would I need a buffered pedal to prevent tone loss, or would the 3 or 4 pedals out front be fine without one?

 

the're both good pedals, most of us round here use one of the other or a korg dt-10.

a buffer is there to prevent loss of signal in long lengths of cable. if you have for instance 20 foot of cable between your guitar and pedal board, all true bypass pedals and then another 20 foot of cable to the amp then you will notice a distinct degrading of the sound quality. a buffer will keep your signal at the correct level. on the other hand if you're using short cable lengths then you may want no buffers in the line so your amp can "see" the true signal coming from your guitar.

its horses for courses i'm afraid, both good in different uses/situations.

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i love my pitchblack. it has so many options, and i can see it perfectly on a dark stage. and while it is suppose to be good to have a buffer first in your chain my singal is no different from when i was using a DT10.

 

Yeah, I had heard it was really easy to use and supposedly more accurate vs. the Boss. I'm still not sure about this whole 'buffer' thing. Could be a lot of hype, but I'm a noob at FX stuff. Maybe it won't be an issue since I don't think I'll use a LOT of pedals out front.

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the're both good pedals, most of us round here use one of the other or a korg dt-10.

a buffer is there to prevent loss of signal in long lengths of cable. if you have for instance 20 foot of cable between your guitar and pedal board, all true bypass pedals and then another 20 foot of cable to the amp then you will notice a distinct degrading of the sound quality. a buffer will keep your signal at the correct level. on the other hand if you're using short cable lengths then you may want no buffers in the line so your amp can "see" the true signal coming from your guitar.

its horses for courses i'm afraid, both good in different uses/situations.

 

Yeah, this is the other thing I was kinda concerned about. I usually use longer cables so I can move around on stage. So, I would probably use a 20ft from my guitar to the pedalboard and then another 20footer to the amp. Then, if I use some FX in the loop, there would be two more 20-30ft cables. Since my JSX has adjustable loop levels, would the long cables/buffers be an issue?

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What do you put out front, what do you put in the loop, and what order works best for you?

 

As a rule of thumb, time based effects (like delay and reverb) go in the amp's loop.

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Just pick a tuner and go with it... even the little pocket korg tuners will work. My guitars are set up well enough that I can tune them before a gig and play the whole show without having to retune. If something happens and I need to retune I can do it by ear in about 5 seconds.

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Just pick a tuner and go with it... even the little pocket korg tuners will work. My guitars are set up well enough that I can tune them before a gig and play the whole show without having to retune. If something happens and I need to retune I can do it by ear in about 5 seconds.

 

Granted, my little Korg tuners work awesome, but I would like the assurance of being able to get back in tune quickly. I would do the ear trick, but sometimes, I'm not so exact. :)

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The TU-2 is so common because it's been around forever. The pitchblack is more accurate than the TU-2 (+/- 1 cent instead of 3), but is a much newer pedal (came out either this year or last year, I forget) which is why you don't see them as much. It is the "spiritual successor" to the DT-10, which was roughly as good as the TU-2.

 

If I were to go out and buy a tuner today, I would get the pitchblack, just because of its better accuracy, smaller footprint, and better-looking display (IMHO) than the TU-2. On the other hand, it *is* true bypass, so if you want to run long cables, you should use a buffer. No, your amp having effects loop level controls is not enough, since those usually won't *boost* the signal, only mix it in with the dry signal. This especially won't have any effect on pedals/cables *before* the effects loop, i.e. between your guitar and the amp input.

 

Just because the Pitchblack is a better tuner than the TU-2, I would get it even though it is true bypass, because you can always get a dedicated signal buffer as well if you experience issues with tone loss when using long cables.

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You can score a TU-2 for probably half the price of a Pitchblack. If you don't mind a little tone suck from the pedal itself (even though Boss pedals have buffers, they are not the best buffers in the business for preserving your high-end) then a used TU-2 is a good purchase.

 

I own a Pitchblack myself and love it, switched over from a Korg DT-10. If you are after a good tuner with a much better buffer than the Boss, you can't go wrong with a DT-10 IMO.

 

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Hmm. Thanks for the replies so far. I'm still not sure if a buffer is really necessary or not. If I were to run two sections of 20ft cable in between my guitar/3-4 FX pedals/amp would a buffer really be necessary? In all actuality, I could run a clean boost in between a tuner and the other FX in front of the amp to help some of the signal loss, correct?

 

So, if the Pitchblack is a better tuner, and I go with that, I could set the front of my chain like this: Guitar>Tuner>Slight Clean Boost>OD>Wah>Amp

 

The only other pedal I might decide to put in front would be a fuzz. Would those 3-5 pedals cause that much of a tone/signal degeneration?

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i think your're getting signal quality and signal size, so to speak, mixed up. a buffer and a boost won't do the dame thing.

 

Hmm.....so a buffer maintains signal quality and the boost just signal size? I was reading a few descriptions for a couple of clean boost pedals, and they mentioned that they would be good as a signal buffer. :confused: I wouldn't use the boost full-tilt, just up a notch to keep the signal moving. That wouldn't work as well as a good buffer, though?

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Wait....would an OD pedal or Wah have a buffer in it? I don't know why I'm so obsessed with this.
:confused:

 

Some pedals do, some don't. All Boss pedals have a buffer. It seems a lot of high production pedals have buffers. Too many buffers can affect your tone as well.

 

If you are looking at the details on a certain pedal and it says "True Bypass", then it does not have a buffer. If you are using all True Bypass pedals, and you have that length of cable your are talking about, it would be a good idea to get a pedal with a buffer in there.

 

For example, if you got a Korg Pitchblack, Jim Dunlop Crybaby, a bad monkey od, a Fulltone Full-Drive, and a Boss DD-7 delay, all of those pedals would have a buffer except the Full-Drive & the Pitchblack. They ARE true bypass.

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Hmm.....so a buffer maintains signal quality and the boost just signal size? I was reading a few descriptions for a couple of clean boost pedals, and they mentioned that they would be good as a signal buffer.
:confused:
I wouldn't use the boost full-tilt, just up a notch to keep the signal moving. That wouldn't work as well as a good buffer, though?

 

radiosilence wasn't quite clear... buffers and boosts are often in the same pedal. Most boost circuits act as buffers, but some boost pedals are true-bypass, so they won't be buffered when they are off. Most "buffer pedals" have boosts in them, so that they can also be used to match different levels to make the system work better, i.e. to boost the output of a single-coil pickup if you normally use humbucking pickups.

 

If the boost pedal is true bypass, it will still be buffered when the pedal is engaged (but not when bypassed, obviously). A non-TB boost will have an input/output buffer, and the footswitch will enable or disable the gain stage.

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radiosilence wasn't quite clear... buffers and boosts are often in the same pedal. Most boost circuits act as buffers, but some boost pedals are true-bypass, so they won't be buffered when they are off. Most "buffer pedals" have boosts in them, so that they can also be used to match different levels to make the system work better, i.e. to boost the output of a single-coil pickup if you normally use humbucking pickups.


If the boost pedal is true bypass, it will still be buffered when the pedal is engaged (but not when bypassed, obviously). A non-TB boost will have an input/output buffer, and the footswitch will enable or disable the gain stage.

 

yeah, what he said. i'm more confuzzled than when i started :confused:

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I've used a TU-2 on my board for years, no issues. Recently got the Korg Pitchblack. I think I like the PB better. The TU-2 lights seem to bounce around a little more, confusing me on the tuning. I think the PB is slightly more stable. Can't help you on the buffering (don't know anything about it).

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