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Hey Re-Amp Guys, get in here


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I would like to know if you have experience recording direct and then re-amping through an amp and recording the result.
And if so, does it work great, okay, not so hot?

I just scored a Re Amp
a '99 version 1 in prince purple
Reamp_2004_1.jpg
I was thinking it would be cool for using pedals as outboard gear but was wondering if any of you have used them with amps and if it works well.

Share your Re-Amp experiences please.

Phil? you up in here?

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Phil? you up in here?

 

Right here my man. :wave:

 

I use a Radial X-Amp for the same basic purpose (re-amplification of pre-recorded tracks). The Reamp is great, but I like some of the extra features of the Radial - the two outputs (one is transformer isolated) and the ability to flip polarity 180 degrees on one of the outputs being the two "biggies" for me.

 

Yes, you can use a re-amplification device as a "send" interface for effects pedals and use them as "outboard" effects that way. Instead of routing a DI'ed guitar track out via the Reamp, use an aux send and route out whatever you want, and then record the output of your effects (or miked amp) back to a new mono or stereo track. Then do it again with a completely different series of pedals or effects settings if you'd like. Then you can bring up the recorded "effect return" track in the mix whenever and however you want...

 

I nearly ALWAYS mic amps / speaker cabs. I don't always use a DI, except with bass - and even if I have a mic on an amp, I always run a DI ( a Groove Tubes Brick tube DI / preamp) with bass, so I tend to "reamplify" with bass more often than guitar. I DO like to make decisions "as I go along" when recording, as opposed to putting off all the decisions until the mix... but whenever I'm "not sure", or whenever the guitar player's tone sux and he (or she) can't be persuaded to try something different, then that's the time to bust out a second DI (or use the Brick) and track that concurrently with whatever amp we're running. It gives us an option in case it "still sounds like suck" later and we want to change it without having to retrack. ;)

 

I would advise using the best direct box or high impedance direct input you have available and forgoing any compression or other processing "on the way in" to your DAW or recorder. Also, leave yourself sufficient headroom - I suggest tracking with your "average" levels in the -18 to -15dBFS range. Occasional peaks can exceed that, but never run it anywhere near clipping...

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Phil? you up in here?


Right here my man.
:wave:

I use a Radial X-Amp for the same basic purpose (re-amplification of pre-recorded tracks). The Reamp is great, but I like some of the extra features of the Radial - the two outputs (one is transformer isolated) and the ability to flip polarity 180 degrees on one of the outputs being the two "biggies" for me.


Yes, you can use a re-amplification device as a "send" interface for effects pedals and use them as "outboard" effects that way. Instead of routing a DI'ed guitar track out via the Reamp, use an aux send and route out whatever you want, and then record the output of your effects (or miked amp) back to a new mono or stereo track. Then do it again with a completely different series of pedals or effects settings if you'd like. Then you can bring up the recorded "effect return" track in the mix whenever and however you want...


I nearly ALWAYS mic amps / speaker cabs. I don't always use a DI, except with bass - and even if I have a mic on an amp, I always run a DI ( a Groove Tubes Brick tube DI / preamp) with bass, so I tend to "reamplify" with bass more often than guitar. I DO like to make decisions "as I go along" when recording, as opposed to putting off all the decisions until the mix... but whenever I'm "not sure", or whenever the guitar player's tone sux and he (or she) can't be persuaded to try something different, then that's the time to bust out a second DI (or use the Brick) and track that concurrently with whatever amp we're running. It gives us an option in case it "still sounds like suck" later and we want to change it without having to retrack.
;)

I would advise using the best direct box or high impedance direct input you have available and forgoing any compression or other processing "on the way in" to your DAW or recorder. Also, leave yourself sufficient headroom - I suggest tracking with your "average" levels in the -18 to -15dBFS range. Occasional peaks can exceed that, but never run it anywhere near clipping...



Great stuff.

I can see how the phase flip would be useful.
Great idea about using aux send. That opens up a lot of creative possibilities.
So :
high end DI
no compression
-18 to -15 db avrg levels

That's just the kind of info i need.
thanks,

you da' man!

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