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Malekko Bit


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No, actually it really sucks. I've tried emailing them twice over the last month. Last time was a week ago. Still no response. It's a shame too. I'm starting to get pissed off.

 

SHHHHHHHHHH!

 

:whisper:OP doesn't know that :whisper: I emailed em about my noisy Phase a month or so ago. Nothin.

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Wait..... so it's a sample rate reducer with a mixer, not a bit crusher :confused:

 

BIT

Malekko Omicron Series DSP sample rate reducer pedal.


The future arrived in 1937 with the advent of digital audio. A few years later, Malekko releases "BIT", the Malekko Omicron Series DSP sample rate reducer pedal.


Featuring a true mix pot allowing 100% wet to 100% dry and an extremely powerful sample rate reduction, you get a super flexible and rich sounding quantization distortion in an unprecedented tiny enclosure at an affordable price.


Small and simple to use, this true bypass pedal has two control pots: MIX and BIT. It really couldn't be any easier!


Varying the sample rate causes the sound to evolve from clean to an increasingly low resolution, bit reduced, square edged staircased version of itself. As the sample rate reduces, harmonics start to distort, attenuate to nothing, and re-appears as 'aliased' frequency inversions, significantly altering the overall harmonic content. The degree of bit-reduction and aliasing is relative to dialed sampling frequency and the note played, allowing the instrumentalist additional control of the effect.


BASS PLAYERS TAKE NOTE: THIS PEDAL SOUNDS INCREDIBLE ON BASS!! The true mix pot gives you mastery over your dry signal, so there is no loss of low end! Coupled with the sickest, sweetest sample reduction destruction, your bandmates will be jealous!


The Malekko BIT pedal ingests the sound of that expensive guitar you bought and changes it into the sound of a poorly strung radioactive tent pole as it enters a wood chipper and runs off a 'standard' 9VDC neg tip regulated power supply (not included).

 

 

Or, from what I gather in the above, the bit knob is a combined purpose sample rate reduction/bitcrushing knob...... :idk:

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Rhetorical question:

 

What is the difference between a "bit crusher" and a "sample rate reducer"?

 

The idea is the same - reduce the sample rate, toss out the Nyquist filters (aliasing is your friend - at least when you're making a bitcrusher) and let that sucker mangle your audio. It's all about embracing all the stuff guys like me normally fight against in the studio. :lol::love::D

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Rhetorical question:


What is the difference between a "bit crusher" and a "sample rate reducer"?


The idea is the same - reduce the sample rate, toss out the Nyquist filters (aliasing is your friend - at least when you're making a bitcrusher) and let that sucker mangle your audio. It's all about embracing all the stuff guys like me normally fight against in the studio.
:lol::love::D

 

Well, they are technically two different effects, both affecting one half of how audio is converted to data. Sample rate reduction is responsible for the bell-like, ring modulator type tones. Bitcrushing is responsible for the squelchy, velcro-fuzz, white noise type effects.

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BASS PLAYERS TAKE NOTE: THIS PEDAL SOUNDS INCREDIBLE ON BASS!! T

 

 

Not a single demo or samples of it? Just an "add to cart", thanks? Yaaaaap, suuuure.

 

I would like to hear a bit of what the {censored} the pedal does, it would take less time to record it than to write down that description.

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Well, they are technically two different effects, both affecting one half of how audio is converted to data. Sample rate reduction is responsible for the bell-like, ring modulator type tones. Bitcrushing is responsible for the squelchy, velcro-fuzz, white noise type effects.

 

 

Okay, assuming you're correct about them being two different effects types, how does a "bitcrusher" function - what specifically does it "do", and how does that differ from what a "sample rate reducer" does?

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Okay, assuming you're correct about them being two different effects types, how does a "bitcrusher" function - what specifically does it "do", and how does that differ from what a "sample rate reducer" does?

 

 

A bit reduction decreases the bit depth of a digital audio file. Taking something like CD quality 16 bit and taking it down to, say, 4 bits, for instance. Reducing bit depth reduces the dynamic range, giving you extremely dramatic distortion and compression.

 

A sample rate reducer reduces the sample rate of the digital audio file. If you started at 44.1 kHz, you can reduce it, reducing amount of samples. Reducing sample rate reduces the frequency range, giving you an artifact-filled, low quality sounding recording.

 

There are a lot of plugins that give you control over both of these functions. Some things that claim to be bitcrushers might actually be more appropriately called samplecrushers, such as this Malekko Bit. The literature for the Bit--as well as its name--seems unclear because it uses sample rate and bit depth interchangeably. Unless the bit knob is reducing both at the same time. But again, the way it's written doesn't really tell us.

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Okay, assuming you're correct about them being two different effects types, how does a "bitcrusher" function - what specifically does it "do", and how does that differ from what a "sample rate reducer" does?

 

They "do" basically the same thing; reduction of information, or data, from input audio. The results sound like two different effects. This is due to the parameter being "reduced". Bit depth measures volume while sample rate measures frequency.

 

A lack of sample rate creates aliasing and fold over frequencies, like so:

 

noloc_nyquist.gif

 

 

A lack of bit depth creates squarewave-like "stepping" with white noise overtones, tangent to fuzz, like so:

 

PureData-WhatIsDigitalAudio-Pcm-en.png

 

 

So though they have the same "reduction of data" premise, you get different sonic effects from either parameter depending on how much information you would like to "lose".

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There are a lot of plugins that give you control over both of these functions. Some things that claim to be bitcrushers might actually be more appropriately called samplecrushers, such as this Malekko Bit. The literature for the Bit--as well as its name--seems unclear because it uses sample rate and bit depth interchangeably. Unless the bit knob is reducing both at the same time. But again, the way it's written doesn't really tell us.

 

This is exactly my point, and it's kind of annoying that they don't just give a distinction. This seems to be a commonly confused distinction among musicians, but surprisingly equally common among builders...... who don't seem interested in clarifying it for the average player.

 

I would think distinguishing between "ringmod-like effect" and "fuzz-like effect" would be pretty important when attempting to sell a product :idk:

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Thanks guys - you posted exactly what I was hoping you would. :)

 

Just doing one or the other will only affect the sound by so much - I would THINK (although I have not messed with or looked at the designs for any commercially produced pedals) that you'd want to do both in a bitcrusher type pedal - lower the bits (say to 4 or 6 bit instead of 16 or 24 bit) and also lower the sample rate.

 

Sample rate alone is going to affect the frequency response more than anything - one half the sample rate (Nyquist frequency) is about where it will top out - above that and you start to get aliasing - which is IMO not a "bad" thing for a pedal that's supposed to sound trashy and lofi, so I would suspect there would NOT be any anti-aliasing brickwall filters used in such a pedal. For a guitar pedal, I'd really drop that sucker down to say 5-10kHz or so.

 

Doing only one or the other only gets you so far in terms of trashing the audio... ideally, I would assume such a pedal would use both a lower bit rate and a lower sampling frequency to achieve the desired effects. That's why I was questioning what the "difference" was between the two pedals. Frankly, I'd be shocked if the majority of such pedals use only one of these methods to lofi the sound - I would think that most of them would use some combination of the two. :idk:

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