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OT: LSDis4heavydrinkers


LSDis4me

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Yesterday's news:

 

Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) for alcoholism: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

 

Teri S Krebs

Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway

 

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i once saw a veteran alcoholic dropping a quarter stamp of acid and it wasn't a pretty sight. i mean that.

i'd like to hear about how the experiment was conducted, and how it had that effect, but i'm not really buying it.


the only way i see it could actually work, and i'm pretty sure it could, is if the user had a totally bad, soul-searching trip and would never want to touch a drop of alcohol after that.............. i could definitely see that happening.

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The best way down from a trip is always a good stiff drink or twenty.

 

 

one of the first times i tripped in college i accidentally drank like 18 coronas not realizing what i was doing b/c i wasnt getting drunk. i later realized i drank 3/4 of 2 12 packs myself b/c everyone else i was with knew better. i did not feel good the next day.

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i'd like to hear about how the experiment was conducted, and how it had that effect, but i'm not really buying it.



the only way i see it could actually work, and i'm pretty sure it could, is if the user had a totally bad, soul-searching trip and would never want to touch a drop of alcohol after that.............. i could definitely see that happening.

 

This study was a meta-analysis, which means that it reviewed all the previous studies on the topic, and identified the overall effect size.

 

You're on the right track with understanding how it would work. In the context of psychedelic psychotherapy, the idea is to have a deeply meaningful therapeutic session, guided by the therapist, that leads to a reevaluation of how the person is currently living, vs. how they would like to be living. Very existential. This could involve a very bad trip, but would not have to (there is an old saying, "Bad trips are the best trips," meaning that bad trips provide psychic material to be later understood and integrated to have better self-awareness).

 

LSD was commonly used in the treatment of a variety of psychological conditions throughout the 50s and 60s. The research was only shut down as part of the demonization of psychedelics by the government, as their recreational use became associated with the sub-culture that was challenging the government and cultural values. It was not shut down because it was too dangerous or ineffective.

 

 

 

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lsd_psychotherapy.jpg

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i once saw a veteran alcoholic dropping a quarter stamp of acid and it wasn't a pretty sight. i mean that.


i'd like to hear about how the experiment was conducted, and how it had that effect, but i'm not really buying it.



the only way i see it could actually work, and i'm pretty sure it could, is if the user had a totally bad, soul-searching trip and would never want to touch a drop of alcohol after that.............. i could definitely see that happening.

 

 

set, setting, the person's mental history, were they drunk at the time?

 

Ibogaine has also been used in curing heroin addiction.

 

Plants and certain synthesized chemicals can have benefits for us.

 

Maybe some shrooms in honey would help too.

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heavy trauma can often stop people who specialize in avoidance in their tracks, this is likely what LSD does as their coping mechanisms melt away, they are laid bare as it were.

 

 

Yes, explicit memory systems are reduced and implicit ones (where traumatic memories are often pushed down to) bubble up. For some people this is hell, others, bliss. It's very salient from a therapeutic standpoint.

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Yes, explicit memory systems are reduced and implicit bubble up. For some people this is hell, others, bliss. It's very salient from a therapeutic standpoint.

 

 

yeah and sometimes the hell is what we really need, especially when it's out personal hell.

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yeah and sometimes the hell is what we really need, especially when it's out personal hell.

 

 

It's the basis of most therapy; coaxing out or treating those traumatic memories that have become automatized through adaptation.

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1. Alcoholic takes LSD.

2. Alcoholic has wonderful trip.

3. Alcoholic realizes alcohol sucks compared to LSD.

4. Alcoholic now emotionally addicted to LSD instead.

 

 

Though you're being funny, this might be why I would suggest meditation instead (the basic premise is the same in their effects in what we're talking about).

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Though you're being funny, it might be why I would suggest meditation instead (the basic premie is the same in their effects in what we're talking about).

 

 

got any DMT out of the base of your spine yet?

 

I am totally going psychedelic after 70...

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yeah, i think id have a difficult time having a meaningful therapy session while watching the room breath and giggling about the morphed human like object the 'dr' would have invariably turned into.

 

 

There had been two types of therapy.

 

1. Psycholytic psychotherapy used very low doses of LSD. Just enough to get the person past their usual defense mechanisms. Then traditional psychodynamic therapy would occur.

 

2. Psychedelic psychotherapy, created by psychiatrists in Canada to treat alcoholics, utilized high doses to get the person to have a novel therapeutically rich session. The setting typically involved having the person lay down with eyesides on and listening to classical music. If the person wanted to talk during the session, there was staff available (and to help them if they became fearful). Otherwise, they were left to experience the event, including the laughter, visual illusions etc. But the context was to have a therapeutic experience, so those set and setting variables tended to increase the likelihood of having such an experience (as contrasted to being at a concert wanting to have a recreational experience).

 

 

Chemist, Sasha Shulgin:

 

 

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