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"Re-learning" the guitar... How?!


stereoloud

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Hey all. Been lurking for years here. Also wanna say that I've been indebted to HCFX for all the up to date gear stuff dreams and not-so-thankful GAS..

 

Here's the thing: I started on guitar playing punk rock and only knew chords and (more!) power chords; refused to pick up scales or whatchamallacallit.

Now 15 years later, all I can do is play feedback and washed behind a wall of stomp boxes.

 

I desperately wanna know the guitar again, and re-learn it from a blues, rock able to jam at will with others perspective. But every time I tried with books or whatever, the scales confuses me as I have no understanding of music theory at all.

 

What do you guys think? How should I start wooing the guitar again?

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Yes, you are indebted to us.

 

Nah, but if you want to "re-learn" guitar just learn songs you like listening too (that isn't punk - find new things). You'll have to practice the parts and you'll like what you're hearing so you'll be really motivated to do more. Then just repeat that forever and play with others as much as possible.

 

Learn the names of each note for every fret and string. I always warm up by playing every 'A', 'B', 'C' etc. on the fretboard. That helps a ton. Same with learning intervals - which ones make up which chords and where they can be found on the fretboard. I use that kind of thinking way more than scale patterns.

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just learn the basic pentatonic scale and major scale. the same scale just moves up and down the fretboard depending on the key. both are pretty simple, just keep running up and down them until you have them down and properly memorized.

 

pick some classic rock/blooz songs, figure out the chords to them, and then the solos and whatever and jam over it all :thu:

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If I had to do it all over again I would've made myself think hard about what I wanted to accomplish skill wise, for what reasons, and what songs I really loved that exemplified that. Then I'd have sat down and learned those songs painstakingly, even by ear.

 

Learning theory is good, it's important, but really it's just giving a name to stuff that you need to internalize by playing it out until it's part of you.

 

So in short, think of all your favorite songs where it just pains you to think that you can't play that, and just sit down and drudge through them. You'll get better, start to see patterns emerging and thats' when you want to start hitting the books.

 

There's no right or wrong way to start, you need to just jump in, but really I think that might be the most natural way to do it.

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If I had to do it all over again I would've made myself think hard about what I wanted to accomplish skill wise, for what reasons, and what songs I really loved that exemplified that. Then I'd have sat down and learned those songs painstakingly...

 

 

Agree, and would also get help if needed to identify why the player chose to play what they did.

 

Make the instructor follow your course outline, not the other way around.

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buy a keyboard and this book.


idiots-guide-cover.jpg

music theory on guitar can be a little confusing. on the keyboard it makes sense. once you've got it, which shouldn't take long, you can translate it to the fret board.

 

 

I agree with this post. It's always good to learn a second instrument too for a different perspective on things.

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buy a keyboard and this book.


idiots-guide-cover.jpg

music theory on guitar can be a little confusing. on the keyboard it makes sense.

once you've got it, which shouldn't take long, you can translate it to the fret board.



What's confusing is using 7 designations for 12 pitch-classes of the ET scale.
Use 12 designations for those 12 pitch-classes and the confusion dissipates
(check the link in my signature for the OZ system)

Of course, it 'makes sense' on a keyboard because it's built upon the same thing.
(7 note names = white keys)


I would suggest the OP look at the Nashville Number system and the CAGED system.
You'll be able to understand music theory using them, no problem whatsoever.

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buy a keyboard and this book.


idiots-guide-cover.jpg

music theory on guitar can be a little confusing. on the keyboard it makes sense. once you've got it, which shouldn't take long, you can translate it to the fret board.

 

 

I did this actually. Decent advice

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buy a keyboard and this book.


idiots-guide-cover.jpg

music theory on guitar can be a little confusing. on the keyboard it makes sense. once you've got it, which shouldn't take long, you can translate it to the fret board.

 

Yeah, true. But that 'translating it to the fretboard' is a pretty big task in its own right. A big part of learning guitar is the 2d nature of the instrument with respect to notes.

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I quit playing for 3 years and was just like you,but i rekindled my determination to really play and blues called me !
I noticed right away that i wasnt listening to the notes and began to focas on learning to listen and the guitar taught me basically , and i was just the listener !
Slow down til you are just nodelling notes and adding chord progressions and rock and roll turns into blues and your now learning yourself by listening !
You must be patient until the fingers find the right positions and try slow hammering on the major notes in the chords,simplfy the chords until you progress and you will get much better !
But learn too listen and be inventive and patient,listen for the dominate tone in A major and its a c sharp note ,that note makes it a Major chord,leave it out and you have your old bar rock chord,so hammer the c major up a fret and its a dominate d if you are chording at the 5th fret on A.
I was just jamming along but i wasnt learning,i was just stagnet and not improving.
I was not patient enough to fool around and discover what was right in front of me.
Im now way past my previous 15 years of playing in 3 years !

You dont think u can find those blues chords and leads but you can in time !
Once your flowing notes and familiar you try too add the next progression and D major works then E major ect:

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Find a piece that you think "That's great, but I could never play it."

Then dedicate hours to doing it.

I did this with piano, worked my arse off and loved it. Just make sure it's something you're in awe of - could be a flamenco piece or something.

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If I had to do it all over again I would've made myself think hard about what I wanted to accomplish skill wise, for what reasons, and what songs I really loved that exemplified that. Then I'd have sat down and learned those songs painstakingly, even by ear.


Learning theory is good, it's important, but really it's just giving a name to stuff that you need to internalize by playing it out until it's part of you.


So in short, think of all your favorite songs where it just pains you to think that you can't play that, and just sit down and drudge through them. You'll get better, start to see patterns emerging and thats' when you want to start hitting the books.


There's no right or wrong way to start, you need to just jump in, but really I think that might be the most natural way to do it.

 

 

Well said.

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I've been reading this new book entitled, Feeding Back: Conversations with Alternative Guitarists. There's a great line by Zoot Horn Rollo (guitarist in Captain Beefheart's band). He teaches guitar now, and says to his students, "Do you want to learn the cliches of the blues language, or do you want to be anti-cliche and have your own voice? You've got to choose. That seems the essential question."

 

This is a super-cool book. The author, an English professor, has deep knowledge of the history of alternative rock and asks good questions in his interviews.

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