Jump to content

Strengthening vocal performances/recordings


pbone

Recommended Posts

  • Members

So my vocal tracks are quite breathy. I'd like to change that. For reference, I have a voice similar to Chris Taylor of Grizzly Bear/CANT. What vocal techniques can I use to help place my voice in a stronger area and remove some of the airy-ness of it? I want my vox to be strong and clear, but usually they can get muddled.

 

halp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Get closer to the mic, use a pop filter to enforce distance and print with a comp if needed. Try to lower ambient volume and increase mic gain. I am a total newb working with cheap gear but proximity makes a huge difference in the sound of my mics. FWIW..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Go and get singing lessons. I'm not trying to be a smart arse, but we're talking about the sound of your voice. Sure, mic technique/ placement can have an effect, but if you want your singing voice to be stronger, the only way you're going to do that is if you get some training, or at the very least train yourself.

 

My voice is quite airy and not that strong, though I can hold a tune and sing with attitude which (I hope) counts for a lot. The best my voice has ever been was a few years ago when I was a singing drummer - that was a real workout for my lungs! So practice. Sing along in the car. Try to get strong chest voice notes and gradually work your way up with them. If you have a breathy singing voice it might be that you're switching to head voice or falsetto to reach notes that you might be able to do in a more full bodied way if you train yourself to.

 

And the quickest way to do that right without straining yourself or damaging your vocal chords is to get some lessons.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

What
vocal techniques
can I use to help place my voice in a stronger area and remove some of the airy-ness of it?

 

 

but yes, i agree lessons are a great idea. even just a few to ensure you're breathing properly and all that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I had a vocal teacher when I was younger and any time I had issues with either bottoming out or getting too breathy or whatever, he always said I was singing out of my range and to change keys. Your voice really isn't going to sound it's best when it's struggling to hit notes. Maybe just try to move your music up or down a step and see what happens.

 

That does kinda lead back to lessons though, really trained singers have the knowhow and stuff to have a wider range.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

It's funny....I like breathy vocals. To each his own.

 

Sounds like you're singing out of your throat instead of out of your chest. Often getting rid of the breathy sound means singing louder with your chest voice.

 

Vocal lessons are a good idea. It's a complicated thing, the human voice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

lessons are sweet, but also... a cool trick to try is to think, "how would an opera singer sing this" and then try that and then think "how would maroon five sing this" and then do that, and then be like "how would prince sing this" and do it... etc etc and so forth.

 

really it does help, gives you ideas of all kinds of voices you never knew you had.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

lessons are sweet, but also... a cool trick to try is to think, "how would an opera singer sing this" and then try that and then think "how would maroon five sing this" and then do that, and then be like "how would prince sing this" and do it... etc etc and so forth.


really it does help, gives you ideas of all kinds of voices you never knew you had.

 

 

I usually do this, but think "how would barney rubble do this?"

 

thanks for all the responses though guys, I'll see what I can do

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Try using your diaphragm more. When you take in a breath, let your gut expand moreso than your chest. It gives a little more girth and power to your voice.

 

I don't know if you actually do this but also try to avoid singing from high in your throat. It strains your vocal cords more and, again, deprives you of POWER

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Try using your diaphragm more. When you take in a breath, let your gut expand moreso than your chest. It gives a little more girth and power to your voice.


I don't know if you actually do this but also try to avoid singing from high in your throat. It strains your vocal cords more and, again, deprives you of POWER

 

 

Thank you sir!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, I had a listen. Here is my comments and suggestions...

 

I absolutely agree with the diaphragm suggestion. You should never lift your shoulders when you breathe in - it stretches the lungs vertically and decreases their maximum capacity. Breathe so that your chest and upper stomach area expand outwards. Support the singing with the diaphragm. None of the songs sound like they're too high in terms of key, but you might want to try them all a a half-step or three lower and see how they feel.

 

IMHO, the one issue you have is... confidence. You sound unsteady and unsure, as if you're not confident of what the melody is, or like you're unsure if you can hold it steady. Breathing exercises and working on your phrasing a bit can help, and IMO, so can singing along with something else that is playing the melody. IOW, track the vocal line with a guitar or keyboard part, and monitor that while you're working on rehearsing the vocal parts. It will help guide you and "train" you where to go. You can always pull it out of the monitor mix when you go to track the vocals... or you can leave it on if you want. In fact, mixing a bit of it into the final mix of the song a bit below the vocal might be appropriate on occasion.

 

Other things that can fatten your voice are only going to do so much though. Like me, you have a higher pitched singing voice, and while I believe a good teacher could definitely help you expand your overall range and timbrel variation abilities, you're always going to be working with the basic instrument you were born with - you'll never be a world-class operatic bass. ;) But you can try singing some parts in octaves (or process your main vocal with an octave plugin), double, triple or quadruple track the lead vocals, use a ribbon mic or large diaphragm dynamic (RE20, etc.) instead of a condenser... the ribbon actually works on several levels. First, they tend to accentuate the upper octaves less than condensers while still retaining excellent, condenser-like transient response. This can help with fairly bright singers. Secondly, most ribbon mikes have bi-directional (figure-8) polar patterns, which provide the greatest amount of proximity effect boost when used in fairly close mic to vocalist distances. This means you can get a nice healthy bass boost depending on how close you get to the mic. BTW, ALWAYS use a good pop filter (I like the Stedman) when singing into a ribbon mic lest you damage the ribbon! I recommend getting the screen 3" or so in front of the mic, and then putting your mouth a good 3-6" from the screen... move further back and sing, then closer in and sing. Record both, then go listen and see which one works best with that mic and your voice on that particular song.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

The CD that came with the Singing For Dummies book totally changed my singing voice. After doing the lessons (I practice about a 30 to 40 minutes, 3 or 4 times a week in my car on the way to work), I found that my natural range was a lot higher than I thought it was. My range was increased and my voice is much more powerful, that leads to more confidence.

 

The book and lessons seem really corny but if you can find some time alone were know one can hear you and do the lessons you will see improvement.

 

singingfordummies.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

The CD that came with the Singing For Dummies book totally changed my singing voice. After doing the lessons (I practice about a 30 to 40 minutes, 3 or 4 times a week in my car on the way to work), I found that my natural range was a lot higher than I thought it was. My range was increased and my voice is much more powerful, that leads to more confidence.


The book and lessons seem really corny but if you can find some time alone were know one can hear you and do the lessons you will see improvement.


singingfordummies.jpg

 

Thanks for the help, guys, really appreciate it. This is my first foray into singing so anything helps at all. I'm glad to get input wherever I can get it. Phil's being his typical awesome self. Thanks bud.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

hahah, sorry but that doesn't sound even a bit like Chris Taylor.

 

Neat synth stuff, but yeah the singing needs work. I find supporting a note from the diaphragm, like everyones said, is the most important. Getting under a note and holding it and pushing it from the gut, fluctuating the volume almost swelling in if youre not 100% sure if youre on pitch, and then already being under that note to put vibrato on it thereafter.

 

Sister Mary Clarance always said to sing like you're singing to someone in the back of the room. Do that, and follow the ways of the lord and you'll be fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...