Jump to content

Kinda OT: CD-R Life expectancy


Moustache_Bash

Recommended Posts

  • Members

I highly doubt any proper businesses release anything on cd-r. cd-rs are more for one-offs, temp storage, DIY and bootleggers, they're nowhere near as durable, have a far shorter shelf life, and would take way longer to produce. burning a CD, even today, takes what, a few minutes if it's a full length? from a manufacturing standpoint it would take way longer and would have more points of failure than pressing a CD.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

The main danger with CDs is that they go mouldy. So how long they last depends on the brand and mostly the conditions they're stored in. Some writeable CDs are more susceptible than others, but most should last 10 years or more before there's even a danger of data loss... as long as you're not burying them at the bottom of the garden.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

So, a CD basically works by having the digital code embedded as tiny pits in the CD that a laser can read.

Pressed CD-ROM, e.g. your mom's CD's that are released by a record company have those pits in a metal film so it's pretty solid.

CD-Rs are pitted into a dye that gets activated by a laser when it's being written. That dye can break down eventually and lose the information.

CD-RW's are sort of like CD-ROMs but it's a weird metal alloy that melts easily.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

So, a CD basically works by having the digital code embedded as tiny pits in the CD that a laser can read.


Pressed CD-ROM, e.g. your mom's CD's that are released by a record company have those pits in a metal film so it's pretty solid.


CD-Rs are pitted into a dye that gets activated by a laser when it's being written. That dye can break down eventually and lose the information.


CD-RW's are sort of like CD-ROMs but it's a weird metal alloy that melts easily.

 

 

Oh, cool information! For poos and gigs, is there any way I can tell by looking at a CD what kind it is?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

The two things you want to protect are the dye coating and the polycarbonate disc.

The dye coating can change it's reflectivity to the spectrum of laser light used in CD drives by long term exposure to infrared and red light, which includes sunlight.

Many things can cause polycarbonate to degrade, including heat, UV light (especially when combined with heat), exposure to certain chemicals, especially acids and chlorine, ozone, and oxidation.

You can avoid most of these problems by storing them in a dark, dry place at room temperature.

Polycarbonate also scratches pretty easily, but if the scratch is on the laser side then it can often be polished out.

The dye is printed on the opposite site of the disc, and there's usually a thin label layer over it. Even a relatively light scratch on the label side can damage the dye layer, and ruin the disc. If you've got a CDR you want to keep for a long time then it's a good idea to use a full size paper or plastic label that covers the entire label side of the disc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...