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Now, now, now children, the electrons don't just do what they 'want'...


Ryan.

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Can you define some {censored} for me? Can you tell me what is actually happening in the universe when my guitar sounds 'fat'?

 

What about when it is 'heavy'?

 

Brittle?

 

Fizzy?

 

The GF had a chem prof that was super strict about defining why things happen. You're not allowed to say that an electron wants to move from one atom to another. Electrons do not want. They don't have high functioning brains. They can't ask for another doritos locos taco because they want it.

 

So anyway... you brainiacs... you princes of men... you cambridge duchess tits...

 

Tell me how you describe your toan, and then tell me THE ACTUAL REASON FOR IT?

 

Especially if your toan is organic. Thick. And meaty.

 

You can't.

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Gin Blossoms named their first full-length studio album New Miserable Experience. In February 1992, while still working to complete it, founding member and lead guitarist/songwriter Doug Hopkins drank heavily and grew increasingly stubborn and disillusioned with the process. Faced with the prospect of being dropped by A&M, the band terminated Hopkins and replaced him with Scott Johnson. The album was completed and the first single released from it was Hopkins' song "Hey Jealousy". It would reach No. 25 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No. 4 on Billboard's Mainstream Rock Tracks, largely fueling the success of New Miserable Experience. However, the achievement would be overshadowed by Hopkins' suicide on December 4, 1993.[2] The following year, another song penned by Hopkins, "Found Out About You", would also reach No. 25 on the Billboard Hot 100 and climb to No. 1 on Billboard's Modern Rock Tracks.

 

He was replaced by Scott Johnson. As a result, the band withheld $15,000 owed to Hopkins until he agreed to sign over half of his publishing royalties. Doug Hopkins also had to relinquish his mechanical royalties to Johnson, his replacement, which he reluctantly agreed to do because of his dire financial situation.[2] While New Miserable Experience did not make a strong debut, it went on to become a multi-platinum album.

 

As the Gin Blossoms experienced mounting success, performing songs he had written, Hopkins became increasingly despondent.[1] Though he had always dreamed of having a gold record, when he received one (for the song "Hey Jealousy"), he hung it up for two weeks before taking it down and then destroying it. Nine days later, during an intake consultation in the detox unit of Phoenix's St. Luke's Hospital, Hopkins snuck out and bought a .38 caliber pistol. The next day, December 5, 1993, Hopkins committed suicide.[2] At his memorial service, bandmate Robin Wilson recalls, a woman approached his former band members with a message from Hopkins upon his death: he was the one who had poured sugar in the gas tank of their tour van in 1992.[1]

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A goldfish doesn't have the same brain power as I do, but it spends its life in search of food, sex, safety, play, etc etc. - the same as me. The way we live our lives are different because of the differences in our intellect, but I'm not so sure that goldfish "wants" any less than I do - it just that it can only satisfy those wants to the extent of its intellect is capable.

 

Maybe "wanting" is a perfect way to describe all the motion in the universe. Everything appears to strive for some perfect stability. Atoms separate to join stronger bonds. Goldfish swim around a bowl looking for food or something to sex with. We pursue happiness. The actual what we're doing might be related to intellectual capacity, but doesn't really mean anything. Happiness for an atom is inconceivable - but its attraction toward particular arrangements over others is perfectly reasonable and apparent. What's the difference between that attraction and our understanding of 'wanting'? Sounds like a distinction without a difference to me and that professor seems to be incorrectly associating capacity to want with intellectual capacity and a knowledge of that want.

 

I'd imagine desires and ideas have a much bigger impact on the physics of the universe than we really understand and probably ever will.

 

Buy a {censored}ing dumble and learn toan already, you dicks.

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A goldfish doesn't have the same brain power as I do, but it spends its life in search of food, sex, safety, play, etc etc. - the same as me. The way we live our lives are different because of the differences in our intellect, but I'm not so sure that goldfish "wants" any less than I do - it just that it can only satisfy those wants to the extent of its intellect is capable.


Maybe "wanting" is a perfect way to describe all the motion in the universe. Everything appears to strive for some perfect stability. Atoms separate to join stronger bonds. Goldfish swim around a bowl looking for food or something to sex with. We pursue happiness. The actual what we're doing might be related to intellectual capacity, but doesn't really mean anything. Happiness for an atom is inconceivable - but its attraction toward particular arrangements over others is perfectly reasonable and apparent. What's the difference between that attraction and our understanding of 'wanting'? Sounds like a distinction without a difference to me and that professor seems to be incorrectly associating capacity to want with intellectual capacity and a knowledge of that want.


I'd imagine desires and ideas have a much bigger impact on the physics of the universe than we really understand and probably ever will.

 

 

False.

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