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OT: Anybody have experience in shooting a music video?


Zetor

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I've shot them (as director, not as talent). Not sure how I could help from your perspective. But if you have any specific questions, I can answer them. Definitely talk with the director and DP ahead of time and see what they're planning and if there are any extras in regard to people/production design that you need to provide. Also, once the thing is finished, don't automatically assume that the editor knows which part goes where. They may not know a solo from a chord. Offer to sit in with them and help them log what footage shows your playing correctly (if that is a concern). But, the main thing is, don't be pushy. It's not your project really, it's their's, and let them know that you're willing to provide as much help as possible to make it as good as it can be, but in the end, don't try to be in control.

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First, what I think many people don't realize is it's going to take like, 4 times longer than you think it's going to take. This is every bit as complicated as going into a studio and recording/tracking etc.. a song, with editing being done later being the equivelent of mastering. It's going to take a long time even for a pro much less a kid that doesn't have a system worked out.

 

I would make sure everyone in the band has their scheduled wiped clean and expect to be doing that all day. If not, you're going to end up with a video missing half your bandmates because they didn't realize shooting was just about to get rolling by the time they were expecting to leave to go on a date, see the dentist, whatever.

 

If the dude knows what he's doing and cares about detail, then you're going to spend hours just trying to get the lighting right. You're also going to have to take several takes of the same shot over and over again even if they turn out alright. If he's expecting to use a green screen or any other effects your going to be there forever.

 

Also, Murphy's law is in full effect so expect something, anything really, to go horrifically wrong and set you back an hour or so.

 

Basically,if you get the shoot over and done with in an hour or two I'd be suspicious that you're going to get a severely amateur looking video you'll be embarrassed of.

 

Communicate a lot with the guy so you make sure you are totally in sync. Does he have all the shots planned out? Does he need you to help figuring out what you want in the video? Is he going to need you to help him pick up the equipment at school because he doesn't have a car? Everyone should know pretty much exactly what's going on before you show up at the shooting location so you can get down to work. You DO NOT want to go through the motions. It's like, again, going to a studio to record a song and not even knowing the arrangement of your song or even the lyrics.

 

Finally, if this dude is putting that much time into your band for free, even if it's for a mandatory project, cater the damn event. Even if you just get a case of water and order some pizza. You're going to be at the site all day and you're going to get hungry and {censored} will fall apart if everyone starts getting impatient or starts leaving one by one to go to Wendy's across town or something. You need food and drinks and your director is going to have enough on his mind.

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^ You've already got yerself a SF barman that has captivated your attention.



But if you're still looking, hit the Castro.



lsdsdfs.jpg

 

There was a bar in the Castro I used to like called the Transfer. They changed the name though, I think. Good New Years parties. We went with a big group one time and my buddy, after an hour or so, was like, "Dude, I think we're in a gay bar."

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My last band did a deal with a local filmmaker/friend where one of the other guys recorded and mixed the soundtrack for his (award winning) short film, and he'd shoot our music video.

 

We put in a fair amount of time/effort and a little money into the preparation and did the shoot over a weekend. Seemed to go well.

 

The guy left the editing to the last minute and handed a half-assed piece of {censored}. We were left thinking "hell, one of us could do better than that". So we bought some video editing software and I spent the next few months teaching myself how to edit video, by editing our video.

 

It was a PITA but it turned out OK in the end. Not great though.

 

 

My advice: make sure you get a copy of the raw, unedited footage and be prepared to put in a bit if work if it doesn't turn out the way you want.

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we did a video, where a friend of ours wanted to make this for himself as a promo project.

he did with our help all the production work, planned the "story book", planned and built up the scenery etc.

all this was done before the actual shot, weeks before for some stuff, the scenery was built the day and night before

 

we then started on a sunday at 9:00 in the morning and worked our asses off until 8:30 in the evening with a short pizza break at lunch time, then our bassist and i had tickets to see new model army and we left and the others cleaned up the rest. i think they had at least another hour to work (beer helped them a bit)

 

our biggest mistake:

the music for the video was just a draft recording. not the final version.

be sure to have the music already recorded, mixed/produced and mastered to a final product (whatever quality standard for this is, is up to you), but shooting a video without knowing what the final music will be is the dumbest thing we evar done.

 

what you need:

- a detailed plan, what and how you want to do, which scenes, which camera view points, which light, etc...

- extra people to help (moving scenery, build up break down, holding lights whatever... the list is long)

- a version of the final music, best would be with a click track mixed to it, then the film editor has it easier to sync the pictures of several takes to the music

- some sort of PA (monitors and amplifier/mixer) to play back the "backtrack" while filming

- should be loud enough, that when the drummer is really playing it could be heard

 

after the video shot it took almost two years, until the music was finally mixed and the video finished etc. a long other story, but if the music would have been ready before, the video would have been ready much earlier...

 

here it is:

[video=youtube;PfOxsAQy-D8]

the singer has left the band now, and yes we look rather stupid on our first video shot :)

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It's tiring work playing a song 10 times in a row, putting your all into each performance. At a live gig you might have two or three intense songs then a more chilled one where you can get your breath back, but if it's an energetic song you're recording, you're gonna be shattered. Bring plenty to drink, a towel to wipe down sweat (unless you want to look like a sea monster in the video) Maybe a couple of identical t shirts or something.

 

This doesn't count if you play shoegaze of course. :D

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This thread had a pretty interesting detour. :lol:

 

Thanks for the numerous helpful replies, everyone!

 

You don't need pointers man, the project is theirs, anything you get out of it is a bonus - just try and have fun and hope for the best. But if they're up for suggestions, and if you're likely to use it at all, have an idea of an image in your head.

 

We

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