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Weird Problem with Biyang Pedal


Faust1587

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I have a Biyang CH-7 Chorus Pedal that is giving me a pulsating noise at a low volume (faster or slow pulsating depending on the movement of the speed knob). I got this pedal new off ebay and sent it back. The seller said it was fine compared to his other ones and there was no noise when using his les paul, but he did get some noise in his stratocaster in singlecoil position.

 

I asked for it back- because of his great reputation I believed him and thought it was maybe a power supply issue. I tried changing the pedal to use batteries and I still got the noise. I took it to a local music store and tried a random les paul through it and guess what? No low pulsating oscillating noise. I tried using the same power supply at the music store at my house but it didnt matter. BUT I found out it is only when I use my BC RICH Mockingbird or Blacktop Jazzmaster that I get this noise. I am using both these guitars in the humbucking position...(single coil didnt matter on my jazzmaster) With My active guitar - Carvin DC200- no noise at all! Anyway how do you fix this little but annoying problem when I use my other guitars?

 

PS When I hit Mi Audio Crunchbox the sound is gone...its only when run clean I get the low pulse

back

 

PPS I tried this pedal by itself with different outlets, amps, cords, and it doesn't get rid of the noise

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Just an opinion but it sounds like single coil 60 cycle hum. do you have a 5 way switch to see if it happens on position 2 and 4?

 

This is with the pedal on right? There is no noise when it is off? I have a few oscillating effects that make a faint pulsating noise when on but the guitar is not played...I think it is part of the deal. They are especially zippery when my OD's are on with high gain.

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Yeah only when the pedal is on.

 

It happens with humbuckers or single coils when I use it- It didn't matter, the seller thought it should, but not in my rig. Like I said the only way I could get rid of it was using my Carvin DC200 (unfortunately not my main guitar)....Maybe you're right about it just being part of the deal. I thought maybe some kind of pedal in the front of my effect chain could alter whatever is causing this sound.

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does it do the same when you have a non-true-bypass pedal before the chorus?

 

 

Well if I turn my MI Audio Crunchbox on (a distortion box), then the sound goes away. Its only when run clean that I get this sound. I also have a Planet Waves Tuner before my Crunchbox, but the tuner on or off doesn't affect anything.

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I tried turning everything off in the room to see what effect it would have, but there was none. Maybe its just the nature of an analog chorus. This one is based on a Boss CE-2. I guess I can live it with it...its only when the pedal is not being played that you notice.

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If it's based on the CE-2 that circuit can produce a tick at times. Sometimes careful wiring technique will take care of it like keeping the input and output wires as far away from the board and potentiometers as possible. The pulsing or tick usually comes from a certain capacitor in the circuit. For what ever reason the input and output wires pick this up. I've had some problems with pulsating or ticking noises at times (typically it pulses or ticks with the rate of the effect). I'm not sure if this will work for that circuit but sometimes putting a resistor on the 9v+ input of the pedal can take the pulsing away. I'm not sure if it will work on that circuit or not. Usually a 100 ohm resistor does the job. It is strange that it will only do it with certain guitars though. Just my thoughts on the subject. Good luck!

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Troubleshooters Guide to the Universe:

 

Go back to the store and locate a couple guitars:

 

- a HB-loaded guitar that has a coil-splitter.

 

- a very high-impedance single coil (something like a Rio Grande hawtass Tejan pickup)

 

- a much lower impedance singlecoil pickup

 

I've got my suspicions about the input buffer design/noise coupling when these problems arise.

We used to see things like this in medical electronics, when naive design methods were used.

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