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Prehistoricpain

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Headphones won't give you full picture re mixes. They're good for critical listening in terms of placements, stereo field, effects and spotting clicks and buzzes and such. But they can't reproduce bass as well as monitors due to their size. So you listen to your mixes on headphones and you keep nudging up the lower EQ thinking you can't hear the bass. Final mix can be over compensated and bass heavy.

I'm not sure what the industry standard is these days but NS10's certainly were in the past. Have we moved on? Maybe. Phil may need to chime in.

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Quote Originally Posted by mchad View Post
Headphones won't give you full picture re mixes. They're good for critical listening in terms of placements, stereo field, effects and spotting clicks and buzzes and such. But they can't reproduce bass as well as monitors due to their size. So you listen to your mixes on headphones and you keep nudging up the lower EQ thinking you can't hear the bass. Final mix can be over compensated and bass heavy.

I'm not sure what the industry standard is these days but NS10's certainly were in the past. Have we moved on? Maybe. Phil may need to chime in.
NS10s don't really have great bass extension either. I believe they have been used mostly when dealing with the midrange.

However I definitely agree, even some cheap powered monitors to serve as a reality check in conjunction with headphones would be a better way to go.

I've been using these: Beyerdynamic DT770 pro
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and these: Behringer Truth B1030A
76420.jpg

Not ideal (the headphones are better for tracking than mixing), but they do ok.
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Quote Originally Posted by Hiwatt Bob View Post
The yamaha's (I think the model number is ns10) are pretty industry standard. No idea how much they are.
While Yamaha still makes nearfields (mainly powered models these days), the NS-10 has been discontinued for years, and while there are still some who swear by them (and those, like me, who swore AT them wink.gif ), they're not readily available, even on the used market, and the prices are not exactly cheap anymore. Plus, you need a good stereo amp to power them, which adds to the cost.

I'd look to some powered nearfields. KRK, M-Audio and several other companies make affordable models. I still swear by my ADAM SA-3 and A7's. Not cheap though. OTOH, look at it this way - nearly every decision you make in the studio is based on what your monitors are telling you. With that in mind, shouldn't your monitoring environment (monitors, amps, control room acoustics) be the best you can afford?

IOW, speakers and room acoustics are crucial elements that are highly under-appreciated, and IMHO, not a good place to skimp on. If you "settle" on something now, you'll lose money later when you have to sell them to get something better. Get something better to begin with, even if it means waiting a little longer, and making do with what you're currently using while you save for something that will serve you well over the long haul. You'll save money that way in the long run. Trust me - this is coming from a guy who went through dozens of different nearfields before finding something I really like. facepalm.gificon_lol.gif
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For relatively cheap headphones, though, I like these guys:
http://www.amazon.com/Sennheiser-HD-.../dp/B000065BPB
They work well for tracking in and you can do some mixing through them (I use a pair of low end M-Audio monitors in conjunction with them to get a fairly decent idea of what my mix sounds like on your average home stereo). It's true you will generally find you need to cut off the bottom end/lower the bass when you go out to monitors, but you can get a pretty good idea of what your mix sounds like and also do a lot of adjustment to the tone of your instruments using headphones.

Those senheissers are also very sturdy. I am a person who tends to treat equipment on the rougher side (especially if i am frustrated) sand i've yet to have any problems with those after quite a few years of use. All my other headphones have managed to fall apart in a fraction of the time.

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The sad truth is, your mixes will likely be heard primarily through earbuds and crappy laptop speakers. I mix on a combination of Tannoy nearfields, crappy behringer cubes, and good Shure in-ears. I forget the model number...SE215 or 315. Mixing on earbuds goes against all conventional wisdom, but whatcha gonna do. When I feel the mix is getting close, I pop those in for a couple of passes.

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I think anyone entering the field would be crazy to go for NS10s, their significance is largely tied to factors other than how good and representative a monitor they were. Not saying nobody should use them but most people used them because they 'know' them which is VERY important for monitoring. I am sure many an engineer than me does much better work on NS10s than I could do on anything but I am sure I can do much better work on my Focal Twin 6BEs than I could on NS10s, if you know what i mean.

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