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FMIC destroys another classic brand - no more Hamer


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Quote Originally Posted by The Great Waldo Pepper

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Hamer's 8 and 12 string basses were pretty original. But who uses those? Jeff Ament from Pearl Jam and?

 

The guy from King's X?

I always thought their superstrat guitars were cool, but they stopped making them when they weren't in vouge, and never picked them up again. Their gibson style guitars were never that appealing to me, stylistically.

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Quote Originally Posted by The Great Waldo Pepper

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Hamer's 8 and 12 string basses were pretty original. But who uses those? Jeff Ament from Pearl Jam and?

 

The guy from King's X?

I always thought their superstrat guitars were cool, but they stopped making them when they weren't in vouge, and never picked them up again. Their gibson style guitars were never that appealing to me, stylistically.

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Quote Originally Posted by erksin

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Hamer had the same problem that Heritage has - when you base your whole concept by copying or trying to capitalize on the traditions and designs of a larger, more well-known and established competitor you will always be in the position of having to retell the story of why you are better. In doing so, you are constantly in the position of defending yourself and playing catch up.


Look at what PRS did - they started out basically making Hamer copies. As soon as they changed the shape of their bodies to something more uniquely PRS they took off.

 

Yep Hrgney did the same thing.

and I LOVE HAMER!

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Quote Originally Posted by erksin

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Hamer had the same problem that Heritage has - when you base your whole concept by copying or trying to capitalize on the traditions and designs of a larger, more well-known and established competitor you will always be in the position of having to retell the story of why you are better. In doing so, you are constantly in the position of defending yourself and playing catch up.


Look at what PRS did - they started out basically making Hamer copies. As soon as they changed the shape of their bodies to something more uniquely PRS they took off.

 

Yep Hrgney did the same thing.

and I LOVE HAMER!

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Quote Originally Posted by The Great Waldo Pepper

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Is this the only question you derived from my post? If so I am not sure I used absolute terms like "most popular" or "best", I certainly wasn't thinking in such absolutes. So I am gonna ask you to clarify what you mean by your question, please.

 

I don't think that Hamer suffered from not being what people want. I know a lot of Hamer fans. The dislike for them suprised me. confused.gif


I think that they were much better guitar makers than business men.

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Quote Originally Posted by The Great Waldo Pepper

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Is this the only question you derived from my post? If so I am not sure I used absolute terms like "most popular" or "best", I certainly wasn't thinking in such absolutes. So I am gonna ask you to clarify what you mean by your question, please.

 

I don't think that Hamer suffered from not being what people want. I know a lot of Hamer fans. The dislike for them suprised me. confused.gif


I think that they were much better guitar makers than business men.

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Quote Originally Posted by dparr

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Strings running through body, brass nut and bridge and a different tone-volume layout that is great.

 

Well where do we start with this? Fender ran strings through the body in 1950, EVERYBODY was putting brass nuts on guitars in the '70s, and I guess if you think moving the knobs around is innovative then I don't really know that we have much if anything left to discuss.


 

Quote Originally Posted by NewRiggins

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you make it sound like Gibson invented electric guitars. The couple of body styles that they have in common with Gibson does not represent the entire production line as a whole.

 

No I don't - I make it sound like Hamer launched their brand on the backs of Gibson's R&D. DC LP Special, Explorer, and Flying V shapes right out of the gate. If they weren't trying to be nothing more than a US-based Ibanez at the time I don't know who else would qualify.


 

Quote Originally Posted by The Great Waldo Pepper

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No he makes it sound like Hamer doesn't make anything that wasn't already done by Gibson. "Me too, I'm cheaper." Literally says, "not the original."


Though I disagree with Erksin on one account. Hamer's 8 and 12 string basses were pretty original. But who uses those? Jeff Ament from Pearl Jam and?

 

Tom Petersson from Cheap Trick! And the circle is complete. lol
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Quote Originally Posted by dparr

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Strings running through body, brass nut and bridge and a different tone-volume layout that is great.

 

Well where do we start with this? Fender ran strings through the body in 1950, EVERYBODY was putting brass nuts on guitars in the '70s, and I guess if you think moving the knobs around is innovative then I don't really know that we have much if anything left to discuss.


 

Quote Originally Posted by NewRiggins

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you make it sound like Gibson invented electric guitars. The couple of body styles that they have in common with Gibson does not represent the entire production line as a whole.

 

No I don't - I make it sound like Hamer launched their brand on the backs of Gibson's R&D. DC LP Special, Explorer, and Flying V shapes right out of the gate. If they weren't trying to be nothing more than a US-based Ibanez at the time I don't know who else would qualify.


 

Quote Originally Posted by The Great Waldo Pepper

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No he makes it sound like Hamer doesn't make anything that wasn't already done by Gibson. "Me too, I'm cheaper." Literally says, "not the original."


Though I disagree with Erksin on one account. Hamer's 8 and 12 string basses were pretty original. But who uses those? Jeff Ament from Pearl Jam and?

 

Tom Petersson from Cheap Trick! And the circle is complete. lol
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Quote Originally Posted by dparr

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I don't think that Hamer suffered from not being what people want. I know a lot of Hamer fans. The dislike for them suprised me. confused.gif


I think that they were much better guitar makers than business men.

 

I had a Heritage rep tell me just this week that the main reason why Heritage isn't more popular is because his guitars don't say 'Gibson' on the headstock. I told him he should probably stop making Gibson copies then if it was holding back the throng of potential buyers.
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Quote Originally Posted by dparr

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I don't think that Hamer suffered from not being what people want. I know a lot of Hamer fans. The dislike for them suprised me. confused.gif


I think that they were much better guitar makers than business men.

 

I had a Heritage rep tell me just this week that the main reason why Heritage isn't more popular is because his guitars don't say 'Gibson' on the headstock. I told him he should probably stop making Gibson copies then if it was holding back the throng of potential buyers.
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Quote Originally Posted by dparr

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I don't think that Hamer suffered from not being what people want. I know a lot of Hamer fans. The dislike for them suprised me. confused.gif


I think that they were much better guitar makers than business men.

 

I don't dislike 'em. They've always struck me as pretty nice guitars. The ones I've played, played well too. But they didn't have much character, very little danger to 'em so they've never resonated with me.


Being in business requires good business people to run it. Otherwise it won't last long and doesn't "deserve" to just because great craftspeople work for it. Sorta the crux of the issue, huh?

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Quote Originally Posted by dparr

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I don't think that Hamer suffered from not being what people want. I know a lot of Hamer fans. The dislike for them suprised me. confused.gif


I think that they were much better guitar makers than business men.

 

I don't dislike 'em. They've always struck me as pretty nice guitars. The ones I've played, played well too. But they didn't have much character, very little danger to 'em so they've never resonated with me.


Being in business requires good business people to run it. Otherwise it won't last long and doesn't "deserve" to just because great craftspeople work for it. Sorta the crux of the issue, huh?

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Quote Originally Posted by zooLemon

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I can't speak to Guild or Jackson but the import Gretsches I've played have been excellent instruments (especially for the price).

 

Well, Guild is not really doing much. They're making a handful of really nice acoustics (in the same plant as Hamer/Ovation), but most of it is imported GAD stuff. A dozen or so archtops, no solidbody electrics. Guild suffers from the same malaise as Hamer - no real brand identity. I've met the folks at the Guild factory. Nice folks, but they've got an uphill battle.


Jackson is doing better. There are still some people who want pointy guitars and superstrats. I've seen a couple of different designs other than those. Don't know how they're doing, but at least they're trying.


Gretsch is doing well. It has it's own unique identity that isn't Gibson or Fender. They've got great manufacturing. And Joe Carducci is doing a great job. But he's got something to work with.

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