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Singers.. how do you think you sound?


flickerfade

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okay a lot of people have trouble when they first hear their voices recorded.. now my problem is similar but probably not common...

 

my recorded voice sounds like im 10 years old.. i dont know if its just me or really how i sound.

 

when i sing into a mic.. live, or just to myself no mic the way my voice sounds to me is really different from how it sounds after i've re-listened to it.. now im hitting all the right notes.. fluctuating just fine.. i dont do anything musically wrong.. at least nothing that i dont notice when im actually singing... and when i listen to the recording im in key.. sounds smooth i guess all the 'skill' part is there so to speak.. but my voice sounds different to me.. just sounds younger..

 

i know the word younger there doesnt really give a good idea of how im hearing myself.. but i really cant find a better way to explain it

 

anyone else have experience this?

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The voice you hear in your head is not the same as everybody else is hearing. You are hearing the sound of yourself transmitted through your head and through the air. Your audience will only hear the sound transmitted through the air.

 

That's the reason your recording sounds so different from what your're hearing when doing the recording. Ask anybody else and they will probably tell you that the recording is a pretty faithful rendition of your voice. It can be pretty discomforting discovering how you REALLY sound, but I'm afraid you will just have to get used to it.

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yeah well i understand that.. but the voice i hear when i sing through a mic.. and then through speakers (not recorded) sounds like what i hear in my head.. is this just all mental? am i really just hearing what i want to hear?

 

i think im also basing this off nothing too solid.. i haven't really recorded my voice at anywhere near a even demo level... or even used a real mic.. just some dinky mic hooked up to a pc or some sort of cheap sound recorder.. would a professional recording record that more rich thicker sound i think im hearing? ah i dunno so hard to explain the differences

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I had the same problem. Recorded voices suck unless recorded well. If your recording yourself on like one of those pocket recorders or anything without a preamp or just plug and play. your voice is going to be compressed. also you might want to ajust the bass or treble or what not. see how that goes.

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Originally posted by ThomasH

The voice you hear in your head is not the same as everybody else is hearing. You are hearing the sound of yourself transmitted through your head and through the air. Your audience will only hear the sound transmitted through the air.


That's the reason your recording sounds so different from what your're hearing when doing the recording.

 

Tape a second mic securely to your head.

 

You'll still sound rubbish, but by Christ, you'll have the audience's attention.:D

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How do I think I sound? Like crap. I'm currently taking singing lessons that I pray will help. Like you I think my voice sounds a lot worse when recorded. My problem isn't sounding 10, but just about everything else. What worries me is sibilance. My S's always sound slurred. I'm sure it's the bad recording equipment so I don't worry too much.

 

You might sound 10 years old because you're singing isn't strong enough yet. Have you tried recording your voice while just talking? That might help answer your question. Lessons and excersises couldn't hurt......at least that's what I tell myself;)

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When I hear songs posted here my usual first impression is that the singers are holding back. It's a certain shyness that prevents true emotion from flowing across the vocal cords. New singers try to exercise perhaps a little too much control and end up giving a diminished performance. I don't mean to say that all who attempt singing are probably great singers but I have heard many potentially great voices getting stuck in the throat. This takes into consideration that a singer has already found the right vocal range and the recording equipment is suitable to the job.

 

Getting past the shyness is key to letting true emotion vent itself as it should be in the song. The making of the song may be an inspired work created by feelings and mood. That can be a very personal and seemingly private experience. But, the delivery and recording should be viewed as an objective thing for the listener's sake. This is accomplished by playing/singing the song over and over until it almost becomes an annoyance to do it one more time. Now those inhibiting emotions should be wrung out of it and objectivity has the chance to work its magic. In short, the song has to be practiced and matured before it is ready for delivery.

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I have been singing a long time, and there are a lot of good posts here. Here is my 2 cents (maybe less):

 

1. To some degree, you either can sing or you can't sing. You can IMPROVE your singing by formal training. But most people I know who "can't" sing, will never be much good at singing. By this I mainly mean pitch stability and vocal dynamics.

 

2. A quality microphone and a bit of effect can indeed make a singer sound better through a PA system or on a recording.

 

3. A truly good singer will sound great singing acapella (no music). To sing good with good emotion and projection, you need to "hear inside your head" what you expect your voice to sound like before it comes out of your mouth. Notice that acapella singing is how Americal Idol separates the wheat from the chaff at the start of a competition. [And no, I do NOT watch AI regularly!]

 

4. If you want a good singing voice, you have to sing, sing, sing. The vocal cords must be worked to be in proper shape. However, straining your voice is a NO NO. Know your proper singing range and stay within its boundries. If you really cannot sing high notes, then do not try by pushing beyond what your anatomy can support. You will get there part way through practice, but you must work within the limitations of your throat.

 

5. Poor singing kills more musical futures than any amount of poor musicianship ever did!

 

Now, where did I put that glass of honey lemonaid...?

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It's the bass. Your head amplifies the bass internally. You loose all that when you record so you end up sounding squeaky and tinny and nasally.

 

You can compensate. Don't sing lower, that's not the problem. Develop your chest voice and resonance.

 

OR

 

Learn to love the voice you have. There are "pretty" singers and then there are a LOT of rock singers who use their strange nasally voices to good effect. If you want to sound like someone-take lessons. If you want to be original - use your inner 10 yr old!:)

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Ummm. . . I guess I don't feel the way most of you do. I sound pretty much the way I think I sound. . . I think. I agree with the SING, SING, SING advice mentioned above. Plus, record yourself and study your singing a lot. Listen to what works and what doesn't and all.

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