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My take on post rock


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Mostly for post rock (mogwai, do make say think, etc.) fans, cause who else has patience or time for drawn out repetitive music :D -

 

Here's my latest recording "the Valley of the Blind EP" - Soundclick page, complete with the cliche post rock song titles :D Anyway, I was looking for critique of my compositions, specifically the "he lifted up his eyes and saw the morning" one, which is the closest thing to post rock that I've written. Keep in mind that it is around 8 minutes long, could be inconvenient to some of you :( . Thank you in advance.

 

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Edited to add: as of now the download hasn't cleared so the only way to listen is through lo-fi or hi-fi links for streaming audio.

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Seems like the guitar parts go up but they could go somewhere from there. I don't know what scale they rise in but when you get to the fifth note in the sequence you need to add something else in there. I don't know how to explain myself properly. In the first part the guitar goes in a scale of 5 notes. Its too simple, thats what im trying to say. Otherwise, good stuff!

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Listening to "he lifted..." It is paced really well--just when I would think, "I'm starting to get sick of this part", you would add a new element. However, the playing itself is a little weak--someone else said "sloppy", that's probably the best word for it. This type of music could really benefit from some added layers, you've most got drums, rhythm instrument, and lead instrument--you've got to add more movement and texture to sustain interest.

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Thank you all for your input, I appreciate all the comments. I have a question about the sloppy playing - is it the rhythm, the lead, the distorted parts(I think these need most improvement, personally), or the whole thing? Percyexpat - I know what you mean, this one is a four note progression, for my next recording I will definitely look into adding a couple more notes/chords to the main progression, I can see how it would sound more interesting. As far as improving this particular composition, it looks like I should really focus on my guitar playing when I re-record the sloppiest parts (or everything :D )

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Originally posted by and

Thank you all for your input, I appreciate all the comments. I have a question about the sloppy playing - is it the rhythm, the lead, the distorted parts(I think these need most improvement, personally), or the whole thing? Percyexpat - I know what you mean, this one is a four note progression, for my next recording I will definitely look into adding a couple more notes/chords to the main progression, I can see how it would sound more interesting. As far as improving this particular composition, it looks like I should really focus on my guitar playing when I re-record the sloppiest parts (or everything
:D
)

 

I'm glad you got what I meant! I didn't articulate it very well. Don't worry about sloppy playing, just takes practise. I'm still absolutely cr*p :p

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I am not concerned about the "sloppy" playing, I am plenty sloppy around.

 

what ? suspect is something that may be related with your genre perception.I am very suspicious about my accumulation in post-rock.I have been listening to local and foreign bands that call themselves or are called as such.My primary observation is that they are deliberately kept long and develop very slowly no matter what the tune has.They are composed by turtles ? guess:)

 

however it was not the case in all the songs ? heard from the genre and you also have other less developed stuff on your page:)

 

the second one for example sounded even short.the guitar work in the middle was interesting.it was not the kind of playing ? am used to here from western fellows.

 

yes there are new elements coming in at every pattern beginning in the first one but its like a new enterence to the same field which begins to sound very crowdy in population but scarce in creating a new community, a new vista.

 

I am not sure but it sounded as if for 8 minutes I listened to the same undergoing guitar and drum combination,if there was a change ? did not noticed it.

 

I liked the mood that you intend to create but you dont have to maintain the mood through pattern reppetition it can be furthere developed with "change" and "variation" in the substructure which will also change the other things.I kind of felt stuck in the same chamber with only one window open to the graveyard.

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Originally posted by and

Thank you all for your input, I appreciate all the comments. I have a question about the sloppy playing - is it the rhythm, the lead, the distorted parts(I think these need most improvement, personally), or the whole thing?

 

To me, its not bad, there are just parts where it is clear that your not planning your next note and you get a little behind the beat. ALWAYS think a few notes ahead, always. Even when improvising, you need to keep it flowing. Your timing is THE most important part. Even NONmusicians can pick up on timing issues. Also, on your delay, its imperative that you set the delays with your tempo. That will clean it up some. If you don't, it'll bring everything else down.

 

Keep up the good rockin'

 

:wave:

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I like my music pretty dense. Not necessarily thick, but densely populated with ideas, themes and sounds. There are things in "he lifted up his eyes" that I like, but they develop and play out over a long period of time. To get to my preferred density this song should be about 50 seconds long, not 500 seconds long.

 

But that is just my personal feeling. Objectively, I think that "he lifted up his eyes" fits the post-rock genre pretty well, and someone who favors that genre will probably be able to give you better feedback than I can.

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Originally posted by rsadasiv

I like my music pretty dense. Not necessarily thick, but densely populated with ideas, themes and sounds. There are things in "he lifted up his eyes" that I like, but they develop and play out over a long period of time. To get to my preferred density this song should be about 50 seconds long, not 500 seconds long.


But that is just my personal feeling. Objectively, I think that "he lifted up his eyes" fits the post-rock genre pretty well, and someone who favors that genre will probably be able to give you better feedback than I can.

 

needs more cowbell :D

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Originally posted by janusmanus

I liked the mood that you intend to create but you dont have to maintain the mood through pattern reppetition...

 

 

Yep...I like the overall feel of this, but it's a lot of the same. The different guitar timbres help - and you certainly have some creative sounds in there (I love the broken up distortion towards the end) - but that's not enough to sustain my interest. Lying underneath the solo guitar, there are only two sections, same key. That's a long time to be rooted on one chord. You may want to think about utilizing some sort of structural phenomena (I used this music theory term in another post recently...sorry for the nerdiness) - i.e., a change in rhythm, dynamics, tonality, density, etc. Basically what janusmanus said about "change and variation in the substructure."

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Thanks for your comments everybody, it seems that not a lot of people care for minimalistic repetitive music. Although I'm sure it would help if I was a little more skilled with guitar playing :D

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I don't think the guitar playing has much to do with what I was trying to say. I actually do like a lot of minimalist music, but "minimalist" doesn't necessarily equal "nothing happening." Minimalism is about efficiency, not lack of structural events. I know that we're mostly talking about popular music (for lack of a better term) in this forum, but go check out Steve Reich's "Three Movements" and "Tehilim"...absolutely amazing pieces. Very minimal, but things are continuously changing throughout...great examples of efficient music that succeeds in holding interest.

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