Jump to content

What type of song/style/genre is most likely to be commercially successfull?


Stoertebeker

Recommended Posts

  • Members

Once the general melodic/harmonic/rythmic outline of a song is composed, it obviously can be arranged in lots of different way:

 

- For example you can dress it up as a pop, rock, metal, RnB, jazz, country, rap, ... type of song

 

- You can change the character of the song, ie. make it a ballad, an uptempo/midtempo song, and so on.

 

- You can use different types of instrumentation: standard four piece, acoustic/electronic instruments, orchestral instrumentation, acapella, big band ...

 

 

Now from a commercial perspective, which combination is most likely to be sucessfull? Any idea? Please give reasons for your choice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

All of the above, and none of the above! Trying to peg down the "most likely to be successful" angle is just a distraction from actually writing songs, IMO.

 

It's similar to speculating about how many angels can dance on the head of pin ... fascinating to a certain extent, but ultimately mysterious.

 

From a commercial perspective? I'm not too sure what that means (that is, which commerical perspective, which market/demographic), nor am I certain of how you'd qualify "success." Too many variables, I think.

 

Interesting question ... can't wait to see other responses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

The cynical answer is that you want to create something that sounds new but is actually very familiar.

 

I don't think this question is answerable, or at least worth answering, in the present commercial atmosphere. The market has been sliced up into so many subgroups, and there aren't a lot of crossovers. Your better bet is to choose the sub-sub-sub-genre that best matches your ability, and pursue it with abandon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

If you are approaching it from the standpoint of being an independent songwriter, the only genres you stand any chance of commercial success in are: country, r&b, and pop. If you truly have one of those rare songs that can be arranged in many different genres and still sound valid, my best advice would be to demo it in every genre and start pitching like mad.

 

If, on the other hand, you intend to perform this song yourself then your best chance would be to choose the genre that mostly closely matches how you want to be perceived by the public. Professionals specialize. Don't release 10 songs in different genres....pick one genre and make that your image.

 

As far as commercial success from either standpoint...it's a long-shot. More than ever the public taste in music is fickle and fast-changing. The key to success in music is to do what you do best, approach it with passion, do lots of it, keep at it for a long time, and hope that somewhere along the continuum of your musical life you have the right song at the right place at the right time. The joy is in the process.

 

A

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Originally posted by Stoertebeker

Once the general melodic/harmonic/rythmic outline of a song is composed, it obviously can be arranged in lots of different way:


- For example you can dress it up as a pop, rock, metal, RnB, jazz, country, rap, ... type of song


- You can change the character of the song, ie. make it a ballad, an uptempo/midtempo song, and so on.


- You can use different types of instrumentation: standard four piece, acoustic/electronic instruments, orchestral instrumentation, acapella, big band ...



Now from a commercial perspective, which combination is most likely to be sucessfull? Any idea? Please give reasons for your choice.

 

 

First of all, for me it's quite difficult to create a composition without applying a genre in its conception. I mean, you can dress up a composition any way you want it but is it going to be quite difficult applying lyrics and all that good stuff.

 

Anyway, for what its worth, I believe that right now (and I think for a long time now) pop will be the most succesful if you have a good hook, or a toe-tappin rhythm, or good melody you will have a hit. Look at Kelly Clarkson... heck... look at Paris Hilton. Now I have to say I'm not a fan and I love when South Park makes fun of her ;-) BUT the music and songs (singles) have been quite catchy. And if that can come from Ms. Hilton then there's either something really wrong with the world or pop music is really the way to go. ;-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...