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Do you steer clear of 'obvious' chord sequences?


Billy Sausage

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The "Money Chords" are I VI II V, or the reharmonization of them.

 

Google

Results 1 - 10 of about 3,830 for "money chords". (0.22 seconds)

Results 1 - 10 of about 36,000 for "reharmonization". (0.33 seconds)

 

Of course, you can play all cadences also Elgoog backwards:

http://elgoog.rb-hosting.de/index.cgi?page=%2Fsearch&cgi=GET&dir=%2F&btnG=hcraeS&q=noitazinomraher&ie=ISO-8859-1&hl=en

 

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I'm kind of split on this. I always like to hear chord progressions that are fresh and unique, and I've been known to pursue those in my own writing, but I don't think the tried and true ones should be avoided completely. There's a reason why people have used them a lot. They work. Angelo's right about the "money chords"--that particular sequence can be used in so many different ways, that it won't necessarily make a song sound bland.

 

Plus I don't think it's enough to do something really weird and offbeat just for the sake of being original. Unless you're purposely going for a jarring, unsettling type feeling in your music, if it doesn't sound natural to the ear, it probably isn't the best idea.

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chords are certainly more homogeneously distributed then money...


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what the {censored} are you talking about? what does wealth distribution have to do with picking chords? nothing. you're just an idiot.

listen to dylan, then listen to nirvana. totally different set of chords that they both make sound organic.

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Recognition, personality and sound image:

 

When I reconsider how I come up with a song, it is not so much the chord progression or cadence spelled in chord symbols, not even the voicings, this is more or less pregiven by the idea.

 

It is the sound image who puts the time stamp on a song. I can very well imagine that someone plays the voicing of Pete Townshend, but applying a complete different sound, and we all would think "Wow, that's refreshing, I never heard that before."

 

Or lets take Madona, she has the same voice eversince, but for every production she collaborate with new producers who present her on a new primer coat of sounds. Or the contemporary distorted guitar sound is very different of what the guitar sounded two or three decades ago, even thus they play more or less the same known chord in rock tunes.

 

Possibly, well I actually think it that way, is that folks who consume music are constantly looking for the new, and nothing is more boring to them then to hear what they already heard once before. This urges musicians to be inventive in the sound department.

 

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chord sequences can bore me, but i don't as a rule try to steer clear of ANYTHING. if i get a good enough melody, a boring chord progression will find new life. it really all depends on the mood...and the position of the moon, and my sciatica, and whichever voice is speaking to me at the moment, and the last CDs i've purchased, and whether or not i'm fighting with the wife....and lots of other {censored}. :)

 

you know, listen to jazz. so many repetitions; there's really like 4-5 'standard' progressions for 1000's of tunes, but they all are distinct. it could be argued that george and ira wrote the 'same song' over and over again, but that would be myopic. they had huge distinctions despite the repetition of chord patterns.

 

peace,

g

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well, besides the fact that you're a spazz, a faux philosophical joke about being hairy and a comment about money really don't have anything to do with chord sequences, no matter how annoying or predictable your statements are.

 

 

 

If you can't discuss things reasonably, take it to Open Jam.

 

This forum is for discussing songwriting.

 

 

From a quick review of this thread, where you earlier called the same person an "idiot," it appears that you're spoiling for a fight.

 

I don't like putting on my moderator hat but I'm going to make this plain: if you want to pick fights with people -- do it somewhere else.

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well, besides the fact that you're a spazz, a faux philosophical joke about being hairy and a comment about money really don't have anything to do with chord sequences, no matter how annoying or predictable your statements are.

 

Hey now.....

 

You seem to have left the 'below' out of your user name.......:o

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*I can play OJ.... As a matter of fact, I'm an expert... ;)

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OK... let's not all descend into the fray... :D

 

 

Guys... if you want to insult anyone -- insult ME in a PM. I'm tough, I've been through a lot and I can pretty much take it.

 

And I'd MUCH rather be insulted one on one in private that let the forum descend into a childish, sub-schoolyard affair.

 

I am so against the idea of having to lock threads (or worse) I'm really hoping we can all get back to treating each other like colleagues and discussing the craft of songwriting and I can go back the important job of keeping the forum free of shoe and cell phone spam -- a job I was born for.

 

:)

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I'm with bluesway on this. If I like the melody I've come up with, I don't care whether the progression is old, well-worn terrain. There are times when something simple and familiar is what works.

 

I'll also say that some way-out artists like Captain Beefheart or the Residents or Faust employ simple chord changes in some of their music because the surface of their sound is so difficult in the first place.

 

I often enjoy throwing in a not-so-obvious chord or two into my songs because that's my style.

 

I honestly haven't come across many artists that I dislike because they used a weird chord sequence. I think of the progression as a neutral thing - it's the stuff on top of it that makes something disagreeable. Some very beautiful music has been made using angular and jarring progressions.

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To me, music is all about expectations: knowing when to meet them, and knowing when to mess with them. The very best songwriters know what the listeners' are expecting from a chord sequence, and know how to make the listeners wait for that. It's almost like they'll lead us down a road with a predictable harmonic sequence we've heard a million times, and just when we're ready to land on that tonic chord, will steer us just a little to the side, or delay that resolution just a little bit.

 

That said, an entire genre of music is almost completely based around one single chord progression, and there is no shortage of originality there. I won't mention what the genre is, but a couple posters here have it in their user name (one poster has it twice ;) )

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That said, an entire genre of music is almost completely based around one single chord progression, and there is no shortage of originality there. I won't mention what the genre is, but a couple posters here have it in their user name (one poster has it twice
;)
)

 

Good point. :)

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That said, an entire genre of music is almost completely based around one single chord progression, and there is no shortage of originality there. I won't mention what the genre is, but a couple posters here have it in their user name (one poster has it twice
;)
)

 

KurdyKurdy? :confused:

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