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D G C B A


TheLunatic_MH

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I think actually an A scale could work well there. However, you'll obviously want to add a lot of chromaticism in there. With the A scale you end up with the weird G# and C# over the D and G chords respectively, but those can work if you remember to lead up to A and D, again respectively. They're just sharp 11s. Also, with the B chord remember that the A will function as a 7th and you have to be careful with that, also remember that in B there's a D# so if you're playing over a major chord there's no way to get around that but just play your D's as D#'s.

 

Ultimately, there's not any one scale that works, but that's closest you can get and have some very interesting solos.

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Try D major -- watch out for the B, of course, but otherwise, you've got a pretty consistent harmonic thing going on... the C works pretty smooth in D, too, since the ear is used to dominant 7ths. Avoid the D natural while you're over the B chord and you don't even have to bend your mind into a new key... exactly.

 

Better yet, play the B as a power chord and you're practically home free.

 

;)

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What key would you play in to solo over that?


Been trying D penatonic scale, doesn't seem quite right? I'm useing all first position/open chords. Would i have to change scales during the progression for it to work?

 

 

The pros might murder me, but I would go here:

 

http://www.looknohands.com/chordhouse/guitar/index_rb.html

 

And click through the scales, changing keys (try all the keys for the chords you cited) and find the scale where all the root notes are present. I'm not sure if it works, but off intuituition, I would say the C major scale works since you haven't specified major/minor. If I'm wrong, flame away.

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Great tool -- there's been an explosion of web-service mini-apps for guitar (our own SW forum regular Eddie Boston has some great ones!)

 

 

I ain't gonna flame you... but C maj is going to be a trainwreck if you try to play over those chords.

 

Of course, in a progression with that much chromaticism (going outside the nominal key) a lot will depend on what you're doing with those chords, how you're playing them rhythmically (and, of course, whether or not you're actually playing the major third in the B).

 

Looking at scales and chord charts is all well and good -- but it can't beat sittind down with a guitar (or piano) and just playing and see where you have to go outside the scale (or simply avoid problematic notes at different times within the nominal scale).

 

That's what I did and, sure enough, D major worked pretty well most of the way, with the provisos I outlined above.

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actually the B chord is a power chord, didn't thik to mention that.:freak:

 

Thanks for all the sugestions, guess i'll just try them and see what comes...:thu:

 

Petty much i have just learned the penatonic and "blues" scales well so far, so i suppose this will be a good to expand my horizons and fly...

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D G C B A is a chain of dominant chords.

 

The first choice chordscale for soloing over the whole progression is mixolydian. For the D G and C chord that is D mixolydian, the notes of D mixolydian are: D E F# G A B C D.

 

I made an audio file for you where I play D mixolydian up and down over the three time repeated pattern:

 

 

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D G C B A is a chain of dominant chords.

 

The first choice chordscale for soloing over the whole progression is mixolydian. For the D G and C chord that is D mixolydian, the notes of D mixolydian are: D E F# G A B C D.

 

I made an audio file for you where I play D mixolydian up and down over the three time repeated pattern:

 

 

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The idea is to keep as many notes equal to D mixolydian over the whole progression. Mixolydian is the first choice scale for dominant chords as we have in your progression. An extrem converse would be to introduce an extra scale for every chord, this could sound like Be Bop from the Forties.

 

The theory behind the audio example is simple; I play a D Mixolydian scale up and down. I start with the note G at the first D chord, and which note falls on what beat is by chance. Plus, since each bar has 8 piano notes, all notes of the seven note scale are heard once in every chord.

 

Then on the B and A chord there is the possibility to alter one or two notes of the D mixolydian scale. See below the chordscale for D G C, and the possible alteration for B and A:

 

D G C chords:

D E F# G A B C D

(= D mixolydian)

 

B chord

D Eb F# G A B C D

(E-flat is the third of the B chord, The third is the most important note in any chord, because it implies the difference between major and minor. But you don

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