Jump to content

I need some new chord and scales ideas please...


Joeytpg

Recommended Posts

  • Members

.....who in here plays blues? or Pop/blues? could someone gimme some nice blues scales and blues based chords that i can use to write some tunes?

 

 

I'm completely new to Blues, or to COOL ASS GUITAR for that matter, even tho i've been playing guitar for close to 10 years, I used to play mostly Metal, and Alternative/punk. And while I developed GREAT speed in my right hand and my powerchording is pretty good, I honestly have been opening up to a BETTER guitar playing. Listening to John Mayer (i love this guy's music, i believe he is the next big thing in music,), listening to Stevie Ray V., B.B. King, etc....

 

This has really changed the way I look at music and specially guitar playing, I'm writing my first CD (I'm a singer songwriter) and what's coming out of me is pop/rock/blusy songs (the singing melody is very pop, but with a lot of rockish/blues).

 

So, i'm learning new chords, and soloing (i was a rythm player mostly before) so, what are good chords and scales to get that rockish/blues melodies going?.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

My feelings about this are mixed.

 

I think the best blues comes from a pretty non-intellectual place. That said, it's clear that some of the more interesting, innovative blues players have had a tremendous amount of knowledge (on some level)... guys like Jimi Hendrix (who was more than a blues player, of course, but still a blues player) brought a lot of knowledge from a lot of areas of guitar to their playing.

 

The school-taught players tend to not do much for me. Guys like Eric Johnson seem are a colossal yawn to me. Others don't do a lot for me, either. I've heard some great technicians from places like Berklee and GIT -- but the percentage of great players from the schools seems to remain about like you find in the general guitarist population.

 

Still, it's clear that SRV studied the crap out of Hendrix and yet, while much of his music was disappointing as a whole, I'd be the last to fault him on technique and feel. (And I was very, very sad to see him die so young -- I think we might have expected some great music at some point to go along with his great playing.)

 

If you want to play blues, I'd say you're on the right track listening to a lot of blues -- although I think a potential danger of studying it is to put an intellectual layer between you and the feeling of the blues.

 

It's not that hard (for a good technician) to mimic, say, Robert Johnson, but I've never heard anyone come close to capturing the feeling of Robert Johnson.

 

I'd say keep listening to blues players but don't just sit there and take apart and put together their technique... when you find blues that talks to you, dig the feel of the music.

 

'Cause without feeling, blues is boring, simplistic, all but pointless, simple wankery.

 

But with feeling, it is transcendent and, at its best, is a timeless evocation of the human condition.

 

______________

 

Back on the studying front, here are a couple of very cool tools created by Eddie Boston, an occasional contributor to our little SW forum here:

 

www.chorderator.com (spell the chords and get all the possible fingerings)

 

http://www.chorderator.com/designer (plug the notes into the neck and see what they spell -- perfect for us preterliterate players when it comes time to jot down fake book arrangemetns of our stuff)

 

www.scalerator.com (quickly show any of a number of scales, major, minor, melodic and harmonic minors, etc)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

My feelings about this are mixed.


I think the best
blues
comes from a pretty non-intellectual place. That said, it's clear that some of the more interesting, innovative blues players have had a tremendous amount of knowledge (on some level)... guys like Jimi Hendrix (who was more than a blues player, of course, but
still
a blues player) brought a lot of knowledge from a lot of areas of guitar to their playing.


The school-taught players tend to not do much for me. Guys like Eric Johnson seem are a colossal yawn to
me
. Others don't do a lot for me, either. I've heard some great technicians from places like Berklee and GIT -- but the percentage of great
players
from the schools seems to remain about like you find in the general guitarist population.


Still, it's clear that SRV studied the crap out of Hendrix and yet, while much of his music was disappointing as a whole, I'd be the last to fault him on technique and feel. (And I was very,
very
sad to see him die so young -- I think we might have expected some great music at some point to go along with his great playing.)


If you want to play blues, I'd say you're on the right track
listening
to a lot of blues -- although I think a potential danger of
studying it
is to put an intellectual layer between you and the
feeling of the blues.


It's not
that
hard (for a good technician) to mimic, say, Robert Johnson, but I've
never
heard anyone come close to capturing the
feeling
of Robert Johnson.


I'd say keep listening to blues players but don't just sit there and take apart and put together their technique... when you find blues that talks to you, dig the
feel
of the music.


'Cause without feeling, blues is boring, simplistic, all but pointless, simple wankery.


But
with
feeling, it is transcendent and, at its best, is a timeless evocation of the human condition.


______________


Back on the studying front, here are a couple of very cool tools created by Eddie Boston, an occasional contributor to our little SW forum here:


(spell the chords and get all the possible fingerings)


(plug the notes into the neck and see what they spell -- perfect for us preterliterate players when it comes time to jot down fake book arrangemetns of our stuff)


(quickly show any of a number of scales, major, minor, melodic and harmonic minors, etc)

 

 

 

Well said. I'm right with you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Still, it's clear that SRV studied the crap out of Hendrix

 

 

Both SRV and Hendrix were fantastic players who were heavily influenced by Bluesmaster Extrordinaire Buddy Guy, and would cheerfully admit it. Many players owe a debt to him. I find most Blues pretty boring (how many Pentatonic jams over 12-bar progressions can one white guy take?) but I rarely hear anyone in any style play with the dynamics and passion of Buddy. He's been around since the early 60's, and he's had some "mainstream success", especially with "Damn Right I've got the Blues", but I consider him an unknown treasure like I do Richard Thompson. Buddy is unbelievable live. Check him out to see how powerful the Blues can be.

 

This is not a plug for Buddy so much as it is advice on learning to play with emotion, which is what the Blues is really about. Technique is not that important but communicating your feelings is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Good call on Buddy.

 

Big BG fan, here. Though I've only seen him once and it was in a wildly overcrowded venue where I had to groove from the back and stand on tiptoes to see him on the low stage over folks' heads... but I still remember how hard he rocked and, of course, the passion he puts into his playing.

 

He's a treasure... but I wouldn't say unknown... at least to most blues fans.

 

_______________

 

Still, as much as Jimi was influenced by Buddy, I think it's clear that he pulled from a far broader array of influences, from bluegrass to the soul bands he came up siding for.

 

And -- I gotta say -- you mentioned a pet peeve of mine... while a lot of blues playing centers around penta scales -- I have to say that those who truly restrict themselves to five tone scales when playing blues will never get beyond a certain, stunted level.

 

Artful blues playing may use the pentatonic structure as a foundation but if I guy doesn't know how to modulate inside the blues, using the right passing tones, he's just wankin'...

 

The core simplicity of the blues is, seems to me, just a jumping off place for a great blues player -- just as it has served as a jumping off place for jazzers for a century or so.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Good blues is simple. Just 3 chords. A D E7.

You can play them in minor key, it gives it that blues feeling. Its all about which Key you can sing in. If you can stick to the keys of E, A or D in major or minor it sounds more like blues.

 

Listen to Muddy Waters or Sunny Boy Williamson only 3 chords but its how you play them that gives you the blues.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...