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How important is performance to your music?


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For me, performance and broadcast is one of the main aspects of my music. I like to think of myself as Phil Ochs if he would've been a raver instead of a hippie. i.e. my music has little meaning without broadcast to an audience.

 

This being the case, I also like to make my live performances as emotionally striking as possible. Every single song has both the potential to transform into a filthy noise jam, as well as the potential to dissolve into pure silence, occasionally both. I literally never play a song the same way twice.

 

How about you?

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I write for myself mainly. But once I hear my songs performed it seems like they were meant to be that way. What is music if it isn't heard? IMO: It is just dots on a piece of paper. So there has to be at least one performance. If not a live one then the one that got it recorded. So to me there isn't really music without performance.

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Performance is essential to my life as a musician. I gig frequently, but most of the situations I'm gigging aren't the "sit quietly and focus on the music" kind of gigs. ;)

 

Performance also has some new meanings to me. In the past, I restricted it to live performance to a live audience. But live performances have always been recorded and allowed for an extend life -- so to speak.

 

Now, with youtube, musicians/songwriters are putting vids up and performing with youtube as their stage. While I don't know much about webcam/webcasting, I've heard about musicians doing something with it for live shows.

 

I guess I've just changed the way I think about performance in general. I still tend to think of it in terms of live shows, but I'm opening up to the notion that it includes recordings, video, etc.

 

So, yeah, it's important. :)

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For me, performance and broadcast is one of the main aspects of my music. I like to think of myself as Phil Ochs if he would've been a raver instead of a hippie. i.e. my music has little meaning without broadcast to an audience.


This being the case, I also like to make my live performances as emotionally striking as possible. Every single song has both the potential to transform into a filthy noise jam, as well as the potential to dissolve into pure silence, occasionally both. I literally never play a song the same way twice.


How about you?

 

 

Kenneth -- do you play live in front of 3DW audiences as well?

 

It's a whole different can of worms than vid.

 

 

I have a love/hate thing with performing. While I was once a 6-nights-a-week partier and lived in clubs and bars I now hate going out. If you can get me up on a stage in front of an audience with a guitar in my hand, I'm fine and that old thing takes over. (Usually, anyhow.) But everything up to and after that is hell. Talking to people, all the logistics.

 

But I'm not entirely comfortable with vid, either. I've worked a fair bit with vid of other people over the years (taking a few classes, interning at a cable station) but I can't say I've ever been all that comfortable when plunked down in front of the cam myself.

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Kenneth -- do you play
live
in front of 3DW audiences as well?


It's a whole different can of worms than vid.



I have a love/hate thing with performing. While I was once a 6-nights-a-week partier and lived in clubs and bars I now hate going out. If you can get me up on a stage in front of an audience with a guitar in my hand, I'm fine and that old
thing
takes over. (Usually, anyhow.) But everything up to and after that is hell. Talking to people, all the logistics.


But I'm not entirely comfortable with vid, either. I've worked a fair bit with vid of other people over the years (taking a few classes, interning at a cable station) but I can't say I've ever been all that comfortable when plunked down in front of the cam myself.

 

 

Honestly, I hate video. Given my previous actions, this might seem non-sequitir, but honestly, playing in front of a live audience is so much more fulfilling for me than playing to a lens. It's a far more dynamic experience. i.e. I feel much more able to "get in character".

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Good deal.

 

In fact... I can only imagine. :D

 

BTW... has anyone ever mentioned lounge-singer-from-hell Monte Vista (of quasi-defunct lounge band Lovingkindness) to you? There's something in your approach that really reminds me of him. But he's not a writer just an interpreter. Or deconstructor. Or destroyer, perhaps, in the eyes of many...

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performance is very important to me.

sure, when you record or jam with people, your music is or will eventually be heard, but i find playing live very different.

I just seem to turn it up a notch,

be it from stress or anxiety or excitment,

but my live perfomances are much better than my recorded songs.

I think that when I'm in my studio, I tend to follow the set rules in music more, but during a show, I feel that the people came to see something special, so I purposley break all those rules to give them something unique.

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...get me up on a stage in front of an audience with a guitar in my hand, I'm fine and that old
thing
takes over. (Usually, anyhow.) But everything up to and after that is hell. Talking to people, all the logistics.

 

 

My thoughts exactly.

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How many people here perform their songs live - solo or with a band?

 

 

For the last couple years I've been playing 2 or 3 times a year with a couple other guys. In theory, it's just a song swap, one guy goes, then the next, then the next. But as often happens you get a couple guys who play a little lead and a guy who's a pretty good harmonica player and it's hard for them to sit on their hands up on stage.

 

Last time one of the guys dropped out and an old buddy of mine came in on lap steel, guitar and a little extra harp (he's also really good but he never has a full kit of harps, ever... 'cause when he was young all anyone wanted him to do was play harp, I think).

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My live experience is limited to a few months - this was over 10 years ago, singing covers with a friend's band. I view my music-making as a writing/recording process leading to the final mix, the end product. Then go onto the next one...pretty much what Chicken Monkey said. I've never performed my songs live. I don't rule out the possibility of doing it in the future but for now I can live without it.

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I write my songs so that they are playable in public without al ot of extras like tapes/midis etc - kinda guitar bass and drums style.. I've played at a few parties and they've worked out pretty well.

I like to play them as close to the original as possible...no surprises for the trio when playing. If we need extended jams we play jams...:thu:

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Honestly, I hate video. Given my previous actions, this might seem non-sequitir, but honestly, playing in front of a live audience is so much more fulfilling for me than playing to a lens. It's a far more dynamic experience. i.e. I feel much more able to "get in character".

 

 

I recently started making performance vids of myself for YouTube, and I think it's great. Performing live solo gigs really isn't practical for me right now, so I feel videos are a great alternative for honing my perfomance chops.

 

Seeing yourself on video can be a rude awakening. But once you get past the squeamishness of watching yourself, it's a really great tool. When you perform live, you can't really see how you look. Being able to play back your performance allows you to screen it for anything that may come off as awkward or distracting to an audience.

 

For one thing, I've noticed that my eyebrows tend to move up and down wildly when I sing. I tend to make a lot of weird facial expressions, and some awkward hand gestures. That's something I probably wouldn't have caught had I not ever seen myself on camera. Now when I perform, I try to be more mindful of those things. And one big advantage is that I get to do as many takes as I want until I get it right.

 

So it may not be the same as having a live audience, but it's definitely great practice for when you do.

 

I think performance is important, because it's the only way of getting to witness how your music affects people. And I don't just mean live performance, but recordings, videos, anything that allows other people to hear what you do. There's nothing wrong with writing songs in your bedroom and singing them to the wall, if that's what makes you happy. But then your music will just sort of exist in a vacuum. Not having other ears to hear and feel the music sort of defeats the purpose of making it, IMO.

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Performance is so absolutely undervalued.

 

Bands think that good music gets them famous, but it's so much based on the performance.

 

Awe inspiring live shows: Brand New, Evaline, Circa Survive, Thrice, Tool

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I recently started making performance vids of myself for YouTube, and I think it's great. Performing live solo gigs really isn't practical for me right now, so I feel videos are a great alternative for honing my perfomance chops.


Seeing yourself on video can be a rude awakening. But once you get past the squeamishness of watching yourself, it's a really great tool. When you perform live, you can't really see how you look. Being able to play back your performance allows you to screen it for anything that may come off as awkward or distracting to an audience.


For one thing, I've noticed that my eyebrows tend to move up and down wildly when I sing. I tend to make a lot of weird facial expressions, and some awkward hand gestures. That's something I probably wouldn't have caught had I not ever seen myself on camera. Now when I perform, I try to be more mindful of those things. And one big advantage is that I get to do as many takes as I want until I get it right.


So it may not be the same as having a live audience, but it's definitely great practice for when you do.


I think performance is important, because it's the only way of getting to witness how your music affects people. And I don't just mean live performance, but recordings, videos, anything that allows other people to hear what you do. There's nothing wrong with writing songs in your bedroom and singing them to the wall, if that's what makes you happy. But then your music will just sort of exist in a vacuum. Not having other ears to hear and feel the music sort of defeats the purpose of making it, IMO.

 

linky linky? :)

 

g

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performance is very important as it brings your work to life! it's almost like a sales pitch, where you have impress.

 

there are few people fortunate enough to be born with the skills to write, sing and perform, so usually it takes practice but i think the key is to be yourself on stage as much as possible, but as with most things in life - the simplest things are the hardest to achieve.

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