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Like She Does


Nick*

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As far as songwriting goes, you've got a pretty good little garage rock/psychedelic tune. :)

 

It's very simple but it's pretty effective from that angle. I wasn't entirely sure of the way the "does it all the time" bridge thing worked out but that might just be more the arrangement/performance.

 

With regard to the performance, it's got some issues. The pitchiness of previous vocals is tamed somewhat here (except for one place where you come in on an awkward pitch and bend toward the note but not quite). I'm not sure the guitar effect (some sort of filter with the resonance kicked up high?) works, it has a nasty metallic ring to my ear (not the good kind of nasty metallic ring, either :(:D ) ... a worse problem from some angles is the way the drums work. The guitar and the drums really seem to be fighting over the time. I would seriously consider using a simple, steady sequenced/quantized beat and work to get the guitars to line up with the drums. That seems like the next place you should put your attentions.

 

Anyhow, on the songwriting front, I think you've really got something pretty successful here. Simple garage rock/psychedelica may seem like a modest challenge -- but anyone who has ever tried to write an "instant garage classic" knows how hard it can be (and isn't that what all garage rockers aspire to? Of course, it is! ;)) On that count, you've done a pretty darn good job, I think.

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Hey blue, I appreciate the review. Just to clear some things up:

 

1) The drums and guitar are definitely not the sound I wanted. I've never really completed a "finalized" version for any song. I basically write these songs thinking one day I might be able to re-record them in a studio and make changes. The guitar sounded very cheesy to me, and the drums worked out so poorly that I tried to put them low in the background.

 

2) The vocals are always something that I get a little worried about. I don't tend to really use vocal effects very often. Actually, I only used the vocal effects in the beginning line "what a beautiful girl." Otherwise, I stuck by the standard clean vox like I do for almost all my vocal recordings. Listening to the song, the verse vocals sound a bit too "boring and talkative." And the chorus vocals sound kind of like a bad impression of a rock singer.

 

 

I appreciate you listening blue. I had a good feeling that the drums and guitar were going to be commented on, because I knew before posting the song that those were 2 very weak points in the song. Although, I'm happy that my name wasn't followed up by the word "Cave" for once :cool:

 

And yeah, everything you said about garage this being a garage rock tune...thanks. That is pretty much exactly what I wanted this song to be.

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On the drums, I've had the same thing happen on my tunes from time to time and the one thing I've found is that if there's a problem between the drums and other instruments, burying the drums seldom does much good. I'll lose them entirely, when they don't work out.

 

The great thing about recording, like writing, the more you do it, overall, the better you get. Like anything there are cycles/ups/downs but if you keep doing it you get better in the long run.

 

Keep rollin', brother!

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Yeah, recording is really its own form of songwriting. But for both songwriting and recording, I pretty much fly solo. I don't do any collaborations for my songs, and I don't get any help with my recordings, which is why I really need to spend more time in the recording forum. I actually just started to learn how to use some of the vocal effects on my machine, however, I'm not very confident in using them. Maybe 95% of the vocal tracks I've done were on standard clean...just never sure what to do/use. I definitely find vox being the hardest part about recording....it's the one thing I could never get the sound I want from.

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Good job Nick. I agree with the points made by B2B. I keep working on recording skills too. I've often thought about going to a studio but a) studios are expensive and b) recording gear gets cheaper all the time so I just buy what I can and work on it at home.

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With regard to vocal effects, Nick, I've been all over the map with that in the 25 years I've been recording fairly seriously. Back in the 80s, I slathered FX over everythign... if I had a guitar pedal I wasn't using, I'd throw it on something just for the heck of it.

 

These days, I tend to back way off the FX. Which is not to say that they're not extremely valuable when used 'just right' for a given song. Sometimes that means not much and sometimes that means a whole lot. (Maybe not too often the latter, though. ;) )

 

I'm a big fan of DIY, but you can learn a lot working with others, as well. Still, I tend to be very much a solo kind of guy. (Balancing that, though, is that I actually studied recording [inexpensive community college courses, pioneering at the time] and worked in commercial studios a fair amount in the 80s.)

 

 

With regard to taking a project to commercial studios as ido1957 mentions -- yeah... if you're made out of money, it can be fun to go to a real, live, slick, commercial studio. Or it can be a real drag.

 

I've seen both. And with folks unfamiliar with the studio, I've seen a lot of wasted time and money.

 

It's my considered opinion that, by and large, those of us who are not working musicians/songwriters/etc are best served by some basic home recording skills. (And, for that matter, many working musicians/songwriters/etc are also well served by a home recording set up, even if they will be completing projects in commercial studios.)

 

Most of us are never going to make much money from music and that doesn't look like it's going to change soon. So, assuming one has a limited budget, he should look at the most effective use of limited monies.

 

You can throw thousands at demoing a song or two in a studio, particularly if you hire some pro players -- or you can have a very decent little home recording rig for the same money (or even a lot less if you target your purchases carefully) and actually improve your writing and performance over a series of projects.

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Hey guys,


Just put this song up today and was wondering what you all thought.


Lyrics....




Like She Does



What a beautiful girl


No one else can smile

Like she does


No one else can cry

Like she does


And no one else can light a room

And silence the crowd with their scent of perfume

Like she does


No one else can love someone

Like she does


No one else can share the world

Likes she does


And no one else can light a room

And silence the crowd with their scent of perfume

Like she does


And she does it all the time


And no one else can light a room

And silence the crowd with their scent of perfume

Like she does


--------------------------------------------



Thanks

 

 

I just had a Cars moment

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ido1957 & blue2blue,

 

I couldn't agree with you guys more. Studios are way too expensive, and I believe that doing it yourself is the much better choice, however, recording is just a frustrating task. I'm actually working on maybe setting up a small little home recording studio. And then maybe we'll see if I have the patience to finish any of my songs :rolleyes:

 

As of right now, I'm basically just writing and recording these songs so that I have an idea of what I should hold onto and what I should toss to the side. That's why I hope no one thinks that those messed up drum beats or crappy acoustic sim guitar sounds would be in a finalized version. I just felt like I had to put in some temporary instruments to fill in some of the spaces. The things that are most important to me is the melody, lyrics, vocals, and overall musical idea of the song. If these usually get a successful feedback, then I tend to put the song in the "keep pile."

 

 

The dman, thanks for listening. The guitar and drums are 2 things that I will be working on for the next time.

 

 

MisfitKay138, I don't listen to the Cars :facepalm:

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1.) Your singing is bad. Use your real voice and focus on hitting the note. The higher the note the harder it is to hit, so try and stay low with your notes. Once you mastered the lower notes try out the higher notes.

 

2.) The rhythm guitar is decent.

 

3.) The lead guitar goes through 2 different phases. The beginning phrase works really good. What you ought to do is extend that longer, build it up, give us some tension. Because that's what the beginning phrase does. Once you extend that specific phrase longer and build up to the climax, then you can do that second phrase.

 

4.) The drums sound awful. They are out of tempo and out of place when you do those fills. Try again.

 

Overal you need to clean up that singing because well....its awful...it makes me cringe.

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I've listened a few times since your post........

 

I've listened to the song 7 times...

 

 

You show style with your voice and that is a good thing.

 

 

You should be telling the dude to learn to hit the notes before he adds any style. Style only makes it harder. If he can't perform the simple, then how is he going to perform the complex?

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I've listened a few times since your post........


The garage thing sticks for me.


You show style with your voice and that is a good thing. If you could filter out some of the lows from the guit the vox might stand on its own enough to make oiadscient give it another listen
;)
.

 

 

Hey, thanks. The garage rock sound is definitely a huge influence on me....so I'm glad that people are able to kind of relate the sound to that.

 

As far as the vox go...I'm not quite sure what to do now.

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1.) Your singing is bad. Use your real voice and focus on hitting the note. The higher the note the harder it is to hit, so try and stay low with your notes. Once you mastered the lower notes try out the higher notes.


2.) The rhythm guitar is decent.


3.) The lead guitar goes through 2 different phases. The beginning phrase works really good. What you ought to do is extend that longer, build it up, give us some tension. Because that's what the beginning phrase does. Once you extend that specific phrase longer and build up to the climax, then you can do that second phrase.


4.) The drums sound awful. They are out of tempo and out of place when you do those fills. Try again.


Overal you need to clean up that singing because well....its awful...it makes me cringe.

 

 

I certainly appreciate the honesty. There seems to be a general consensus about the poor arrangement of drums. As far as the vox go, well....it is what it is. If you don't like my singing voice, then there is no way you would like my "real voice." Even the parts where it seems like I talk out the words, in reality, that sounds nothing like my "real voice." Mainly because I don't think my real New York voice would work in those types of situations, so I have to twist it around quite a bit.

 

Like I said, I appreciate the criticism, and I do wish more people would take an honest approach to critiquing the vocals....hopefully more do. You should know quite a bit about this song......you did listen to it more than I did :thu:

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I certainly appreciate the honesty. There seems to be a general consensus about the poor arrangement of drums. As far as the vox go, well....it is what it is. If you don't like my singing voice, then there is no way you would like my "real voice." Even the parts where it seems like I talk out the words, in reality, that sounds nothing like my "real voice." Mainly because I don't think my real New York voice would work in those types of situations, so I have to twist it around quite a bit.


Like I said, I appreciate the criticism, and I do wish more people would take an honest approach to critiquing the vocals....hopefully more do. You should know quite a bit about this song......you did listen to it more than I did
:thu:

 

Well listen, I am glad you appreciate the criticism. Art is a very tough field. Yes I said "Art"...Music is an art. It is a feeling that needs to be conveyed, whether shallow or deep.

 

Art is a very tough field because well anybody can pick up a pencil and draw and anybody can pick up a guitar and play it. Its the individuals that have the capability to create a very high standard for themselves that will improve. This requires very detailed criticism. Once you learn from your mistakes you yourself will realize "wow that was awful" and you won't ever do it again.

 

 

What I meant by your "real voice" is that you ough to try and hit a certain note without putting a style to it. That is still singing, its just that the voice isn't curled or nasally sounding which is two different styles....follow me?

 

Listen, Im no expert either, but I am very critical and very aware of what the professionals sound like...

 

Try and critique me and tell me what you hear that you hate. If you don't hate anything about my musical creations, then that means you aren't critical enough. I am looking forward to your review...

 

http://acapella.harmony-central.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1905711

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I kind of like it...it's a little rough, especially the drum parts that have been oft commented, but it's got a nice, simplistic feel to it. It just seems to drift.

 

As for vocals, if you're not going to sing in your voice, you may want to add some "grit" to your voice. Right now, they're just kind of plain, but if you had a slight rasp, I think it would sound better. Think of an old blues singer, who's smoked too many cigarettes and drank too much whiskey and try to create that sound. And keep the style the same throughout, don't jump up for the chorus...the quick dynamic just doesn't seem to fit in with the overall simplistic feel of the song.

 

I like the simple melody. Fix up some of the instrumentation problem, and add some rasp to the vocals, and you'd have a decent song. Lyrically, its really plain and straightforward which seems to work really well with the mellow tone and feel of the melody and rhythm.

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Well listen, I am glad you appreciate the criticism. Art is a very tough field. Yes I said "Art"...Music is an art. It is a feeling that needs to be conveyed, whether shallow or deep.


Art is a very tough field because well anybody can pick up a pencil and draw and anybody can pick up a guitar and play it. Its the individuals that have the capability to create a very high standard for themselves that will improve. This requires very detailed criticism. Once you learn from your mistakes you yourself will realize "wow that was awful" and you won't ever do it again.



What I meant by your "real voice" is that you ough to try and hit a certain note without putting a style to it. That is still singing, its just that the voice isn't curled or nasally sounding which is two different styles....follow me?


Listen, Im no expert either, but I am very critical and very aware of what the professionals sound like...


Try and critique me and tell me what you hear that you hate. If you don't hate anything about my musical creations, then that means you aren't critical enough. I am looking forward to your review...


 

 

 

I think your outlook on art is a little different than mine. While art can be something that one continually strives for excellence in, it is also very subjective. Some of my favorite songwriters can't read a word of music....yet, they are still great songwriters. I think sometimes music can be planned art....other times it can be drunk buddies making load noise out of their garage.....either way, they both can sound good.

 

 

Now, I listened to the 3 songs you had up. It's experimental instrumental stuff, and I thought they were good. They are a bit different than what I usually play or listen to, so normally I wouldn't usually critique any of these songs. But there is certainly nothing about those songs that I hated. I'm not sure why anyone would hate anything about them. And I'm pretty confident you wouldn't find many who would. Overall, I thought they were pretty good.

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I kind of like it...it's a little rough, especially the drum parts that have been oft commented, but it's got a nice, simplistic feel to it. It just seems to drift.


As for vocals, if you're not going to sing in your voice, you may want to add some "grit" to your voice. Right now, they're just kind of plain, but if you had a slight rasp, I think it would sound better. Think of an old blues singer, who's smoked too many cigarettes and drank too much whiskey and try to create that sound. And keep the style the same throughout, don't jump up for the chorus...the quick dynamic just doesn't seem to fit in with the overall simplistic feel of the song.


I like the simple melody. Fix up some of the instrumentation problem, and add some rasp to the vocals, and you'd have a decent song. Lyrically, its really plain and straightforward which seems to work really well with the mellow tone and feel of the melody and rhythm.

 

 

Thanks for listening! I actually just quit smoking, but maybe I will take up whiskey :lol: I just quit, so I'm kind of interested to see the impact it may have on my voice. I'm only 20, so it's not like I've smoked for many years, but I find it's better to quit young than regret it later. But I'll see what I can do about the vocals...I didn't expect to get the negative feedback on them that I got. But that's cool. I will have to go back to the drawing board and see what can be done to the vox to fit the song well.

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Thanks for listening! I actually just quit smoking, but maybe I will take up whiskey
:lol:
I just quit, so I'm kind of interested to see the impact it may have on my voice. I'm only 20, so it's not like I've smoked for many years, but I find it's better to quit young than regret it later. But I'll see what I can do about the vocals...I didn't expect to get the negative feedback on them that I got. But that's cool. I will have to go back to the drawing board and see what can be done to the vox to fit the song well.

 

I'm not saying that smoking and drinking will make you a better singer. In fact, it could hamper your voice and certainly destroy your health! Congrats on quitting:thu:. However, the vocals need something. The problem I have with your singing is that right now, its very monotone and boring. The fact that there isn't much variation in the melody only ends up highlighting the monotony. I love the simple, straightforward melody, but in order to pull it off, you have to create dynamics in the vocal style. You have to add something new to create the feeling you want.

 

A good example of this is Jack Bruce in Cream's Tale of Brave Ulysses. The vocal melody of the first few verses is very tame and simple. Its almost like he's saying the lines. But, the tone of his voice is what creates the tension in the song. Similarly, Eric Burdon in the Animal's version of House of the Rising Sun. That first verse is very straightforward and simple, but his voice creates the necessary tension to make it work.

 

I think you need to find how to give your vocals that edge. In my opinion, a raspy quality could get you there, but you might want to do something else. In any case, you need to break the monotony of the tone you have now. It doesn't fit in well with the overall feel of the song. If you can create that vocal tension, you would have an amazing song. I love its simple, drifting feel.

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Kinda sloppy. But I like it. And you're singing's got charm, bro. Forget what some others said. You sound a lot like J. Mascis, actually. A few of my favorite singers have trouble carrying a tune - they really have to work for it. But that's my favorite thing about them. Like J., and that dude from the Flaming Lips, Wayne Coyne. Lou Reed, for sure.

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Listening to this again tonight some thoughts came to mind... (I know, I know) Did you write the music first and then the vocal melody.

At times it sounds like you're trying to fit the melody to the chords.

If that's true, I wonder if you could try to put together the melody line(s) first, then add chords afterwards. I agree with the Lou Reed similarities. I'm just thinking there may be a struggle between the music and the vocal melody. And (for me) the vocal melody should dominate in songwriting... :cool:

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You sound a lot like J. Mascis

 

 

Yeah, I think I posted that comparison on an earlier song. And IIRC, this one is significantly tighter. You still do the doubled left right acoustic thing, and I still think that it is distracting but I guess I'll save my breath. And I think I mentioned before that the guitar leads should at least try to spend their time in the same key as the chords, but....

 

Anyway, I think this is better than some of your previous songs. You're going in the right direction.

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