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do you write the music first before vocals


Still.ill

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i read that many bands would have instrumentals first and then make them into songs after adding some vocals on them. ---

 

as opposed to having an intro/verse chords (singing over that) and then coming up with bridge chords chorus chords--- like writing the song in parts

 

i've been doing the 2nd method so far but i always have trouble coming up with anything interesting after intro/verse

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I usually have a basic chord verse structure, and sing rubbish lines over the top of that to get a melody. then move on to chorus and changes. with more rubbish lines that I can never remember but sound great.

 

I asked a friend about it once, and he said to just do whatever is comfortable for the song.

So for instance, if you have a riff laying around for ages, but could never get much for it melody wise - finish the music off first then move on.

 

I tend to write alot of my songs in 5 mins when the inspiration is still there. I have a short attention span, so its good to get it out. Though mind you - I almost always get stuck after the first verse chorus and into like you.

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My stuff comes to me in many ways....the muse can be fickle.

 

I like it when I have words and music at the same time and the song is just there to be fleshed out.

 

Sometimes, though, I'll only have a melodic hook stuck in my head and I'll work with that until lyrics begin to form around it.

 

It is seldom that I write out lyrics and then try to find some music for them and very seldom that I actually sit down with the intent of writing a song without some inspiration already there.

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the thing i work hard at, is NOT having a method.

 

that way, i do not have any preconceived notion of what i'm supposed to be doing.

 

i often come up with lyric ideas in the weirdest places..

supermarket....

trail running..

skiing....

 

i keep a pad.

i write down snippets of ideas to re-visit later.

 

 

same thing with tunes, i'm constantly writing music and riffs in my head, and more times than not, it comes from a rhythm of whatever i'm doing...

i start playing mental drums to whatever the rhythm of life is at the moment, and the music just starts flowing.

 

i can marry the lyric and melodies later, so it doesn't really matter which comes first.

 

on the more rare occasion, the lyric comes to me at the same instant as the decision about the rhythm or melody.

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It's very seldom music first for me. I make up music all the time. When I'm not improvising, I noodle. It's very simple for me to come up with workable verse chorus combinations as needed on the fly. Not necessarily profound or notable ones, mind you. But, you know, serviceable. (I do roots music. A cool chord change would scare people. :D )

 

When I was younger, it was the other way around. I'd write buckets of lyrics matched to what I tended to consider throw away changes and melodies (such as I ever define melodies formally). For a while I wrote a lot of blues because (well, I listened to a lot of blues and) I never seemed to want to commit to any one fixed musical accompaniment.

 

Nowadays, most times when I write a song, once the words start, the music just seems to flow out from the words -- at least once I find the vibe that is the catalyst.

 

But I still find myself reinventing (you should pardon that word that should itself be reinvented) many of my songs with new or improvised music because, I dunno, the muses tell me to muck around (or maybe I start singing a snatch of some song because it's the only thing I can remember at the time, my sequential memory seems to have never developed properly, which really undermined my dream of doing Albee on Broadway.)

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i usually write the music.

 

afterwards, i wont make words off the chords. ill seperately make lyrics that i think explains my message the best.

 

then i will take the music and the words and somehow find a way to incorporate them with eachother. that way i have a good chord progression and good lyrics.

 

this can be a long process, but in the end i am always satisfied with the result and rarely scrap the songs produced.

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I'm a melody person first but over time I've been working on bringing my lyrics quality up.

 

I'm not a big fan of songs where the writer(s) slap together a riff or a set of chords and have the singer just warble and yammer over top. Some half-baked Led Zeppelin songs are like that. For me, I see right through that and I just tune out. Unfortunately it's a very common tactic in the rock world and it makes for a lot of boring music IMO. It's not very often that a singer can graft a good melody on top of existing music. I'm sure someone can point out exceptions but as an overall songwriting approach I think it's poor.

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I'm a melody person first but over time I've been working on bringing my lyrics quality up.


I'm not a big fan of songs where the writer(s) slap together a riff or a set of chords and have the singer just warble and yammer over top. Some half-baked Led Zeppelin songs are like that. For me, I see right through that and I just tune out. Unfortunately it's a very common tactic in the rock world and it makes for a lot of boring music IMO. It's not very often that a singer can graft a good melody on top of existing music. I'm sure someone can point out exceptions but as an overall songwriting approach I think it's poor.

 

 

sometimes works i guess

 

 

 

 

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Not that I'm any great example, since I still haven't come up with any actual lyrics for my songs, but I have always done the instrumental bit first...the chords, the bits that go with them...

 

My issue is I have problems then coming up with a lead melody with which to fit lyrics to, because I tend to go overboard with my instruments and put too many on, so there's no "room" for a lead melody. lol

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Working with a MC, the band writes the music and he writes the lyrics. Usually, we brainstorm before formulation to decide how to get what we want.

 

I've written music that seems to fit his lyrics and he sometimes writes words inspired off our jam. I don't think it really matters how you do it. :thu:

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