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Songwriter looking for advice.If this is off topic just delete this thread then.


pogoshoes

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Hi. I don't perform and I don't record.I just write songs.Does anyone know what I could do with them?How do you make them available to other people? I don't know any musicians and none of my friends or family are really into music.Does anyone have any estimations of how much it would cost to go to a little studio and make a record?Is there something I need to do to start publishing them?Maybe all songwriters have this type of problem.

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I don't know how much a studio costs in your area but it ought to be easy for you to check on that. However, from what you say, I'm not sure how this would help you - you'd still need to find musicians to play and sing your songs.

 

How are you writing your songs if you don't perform and/or record? Are you writing sheet music?

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Hi, I'm the moderator and this is a fine topic for discussion, and, in fact, comes up from time to time.

 

Do you write just lyrics or do you write lyrics and music? Even if you're not a performer, if you're writing the music for your songs, you may well be in a good position to at least record rough demos of them yourself (using all these groovy high-tech music production tools/toys we have at our disposal now) -- maybe you won't be creating finished masterpieces (you won't, at least not for a while) but they'll probably be enough for you to get an idea of how your songs sound -- and probably enough to show them to other musicians. (If you read and write music, you can give musicians the sheet music -- but many musicians are not really all that notation-literate, so it can be handy to have a rough demo available.) Even if you, yourself, are not notation-literate, many of today's tools can help, there, as well.

 

If you're strictly a lyricist, it seems like you can play with algorithmic arrangement and composition tools like Band in a Box or others, or you can try to hook up with musicians who are not lyricists but who may have a good feel for creating music to go with your lyrics.

 

 

One thing that's important to keep straight is goals and motivation.

 

A lot of folks who haven't been around the block in the music biz often have rather exaggerated fantasies about making it big. This is, almost certainly, not going to happen. Put it out of your mind. Joe Sixpack does not go from playing a couple chords or singing a few verses at the karaoke bar to the big time on the strength of even a superbly written song or three.

 

Go to a publisher with a truly great song -- (assuming the dunderheads at the publisher would even recognize same, a quite likely implausible leap of conjecture) and the publisher -- if he's legit and not some scamster -- is going to look at your one masterpiece and say, "What else have you got? We want to see evidence that you can and will continue churning out usable songs week after week. We don't want to buy a single song -- even if it could be a big hit. We want to invest in our future 'together.' "

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Songwriting, like any creative endeavor, can be enormous fun, highly satisfying.

 

If, like me, you grew up loving music in what (even in my long-ago youth) was and continues to be a consumption-oriented aesthetic culture, you may find it enormously liberating, even, you should pardon the expression, empowering to (eventually) make music that you, yourself, enjoy listening to.

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