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Germ of Something (4/30)


rsadasiv

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Born a Roman son of the privileged class

You always felt like a boy from the streets

 

At the suburban skate parks

And the 7-11

You fell in love with America

 

The land of reinvention

The land of good intentions

Everyone's that boy from the street

 

Wide open spaces

Friendly faces

You fell in love with America

 

At the suburban skate parks

And the 7-11

You fell in love with America

 

Ciao Marco

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A valedictory farewell to a fallen brother of the streets?

 

It feels a little more like blank verse on the page. And as it (currently) goes out on detail, it suggests that perhaps it's not yet complete... or perhaps the 7/11 and the skate parks do say sum it all up, after all...?

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Yeah, one of my good friends in DC is going to South Africa for three years.

 

There's a part of him that is very identified with the first generation American immigrant narrative, but he is actually a much more complex person than I have drawn. In the expat Euro social scene he is much more traditionally Italian. While he enjoys identifying and interacting with the great American hoi polloi, he uses his money and connections to make his life easier in ways which are totally unavailable to the common man.

 

One of the most likeable things about him is that he is quite reconciled and at peace with these contradictions in his life, but it is hard to draw a portrait of a working stiff family man who commutes to his office on a $5000 custom built Italian racing bicycle without introducing a note of hypocracy which compromises his essential likeability.

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Yeah, one of my good friends in DC is going to South Africa for three years.


There's a part of him that is very identified with the first generation American immigrant narrative, but he is actually a much more complex person than I have drawn. In the expat Euro social scene he is much more traditionally Italian. While he enjoys identifying and interacting with the great American hoi polloi, he uses his money and connections to make his life easier in ways which are totally unavailable to the common man.


One of the most likeable things about him is that he is quite reconciled and at peace with these contradictions in his life, but it is hard to draw a portrait of a working stiff family man who commutes to his office on a $5000 custom built Italian racing bicycle without introducing a note of hypocracy which compromises his essential likeability.

Ah... glad to see it's just a temporary farewell. There seemed an air of finality to me initially.

 

BTW, I almost feel like I know that guy.

 

A guy on the outer edge of my circle of coffee house pals is an Italian expat (he's been here between 12 and maybe 20 years, as I figure it, came over as a young man, probably in his 40s now)... he's a heck of a nice guy... a big guy in a small body... lots of sharply funny personality. Usually has a very nice car or truck but typically drives an old beater pickup or one of his motorcycles.

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