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wikirhyme: best rhyming dictionary yet


DukeOfBoom

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I dunno. It couldn't connect bashful and Nashville -- and those do rhyme in a large part of the US, including large parts of Tennessee.

 

But it did 'rhyme' Nashville with Franklinville, Vacaville, Avril, and my two absolute favorites: Faneuil -- which is pronounced /?f

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I think everyone's got to write at least one big rhyming dictionary song just to get it out of their system. Of course, rap has provided a ready outlet for aggressive rhyme and over the top word play. Sadly, a lot of rappers just slice and dice others' rhymes. Understood there are boasting and cutting traditions of borrowing and building upon that go back before the African diaspora... still, so many rhymes one hears in today's hip hop are so tired.

 

And, of course, not everyone has an endless enthusiasm for the overly clever.

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I think everyone's got to write at least one big rhyming dictionary song just to get it out of their system. Of course, rap has provided a ready outlet for aggressive rhyme and over the top word play. Sadly, a lot of rappers just slice and dice other's rhymes. Understood there are boasting and cutting traditions of borrowing and building upon that go back before the African diaspora... still, so many rhymes one hears in today's hip hop are
so tired.


And, of course, not
everyone
has an endless enthusiasm for the overly clever.

 

 

Having grown up with hip hop from it's early stages to it's golden era ('92 - '95) I can safely say that it's pretty much the primary influence that shapes how construct rhymes. Those guys could rhyme phrases and entire sentences while still making perfect sense.

 

I'll admit that rappers have gotten just flat out lazy these days, underground included. Of course there are some exceptions (MF DOOM, Elzhi, Joel Ortiz, Koyaki, Skyzoo, Curen$$y to name a few) but yeah, the age of the iconic rapper is no more.

 

On the music/beats end of things, currently Hip Hop is the most advanced it's ever been.

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I like it! I put in Insecurity and got:

 

bogie, bookie, bully, buri, Bushey, cardiopulmonary, curiously, demurely, goodie, goodly, immaturity, impurity, Woodberry, assuredly, bullishly, butchery, figuratively, Luedtke, neuropathy, Nurmi, pleurisy, {censored}, reassuringly, sugary, woolsey

 

 

I think that's great. Bookmarked.

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I recently heard a good interview with Stephen Sondheim, where he talks about rhyming, and when to use a "trick rhyme" and when to stick with something like day/say.


This isn't it, but it's close:
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/entertainment/july-dec10/sondheim_12-08.html

I'm going to have to check that out...

 

I do like trick rhymes in the right place and time -- but I always make the decision intuitively/experimentally.

 

I was thinking about this thread last night when I ran through one of my old songs that has the quattrain:

 

Walked along the aqueduct

just before the dawn

The sun looked old and tired as it came up

but at least now the night is gone

 

(There's a bit of syncopation in the delivery. ;) )

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Having grown up with hip hop from it's early stages to it's golden era ('92 - '95) I can safely say that it's pretty much the primary influence that shapes how construct rhymes. Those guys could rhyme phrases and entire sentences while still making perfect sense.


I'll admit that rappers have gotten just flat out lazy these days, underground included. Of course there are some exceptions (MF DOOM, Elzhi, Joel Ortiz, Koyaki, Skyzoo, Curen$$y to name a few) but yeah, the age of the iconic rapper is no more.


On the music/beats end of things, currently Hip Hop is the most advanced it's ever been.

For sure, I was only talking about many contemporary rappers, not all, by any means. Rap in its present form has been around for something more than 30 years... it's only natural that there's some ossification -- look at its chronological and, in many ways, cultural half-sibling, punk. The petrification began as soon as the music biz started figuring out they could make some money off it and repackaging and controlling it to sell to younger audiences as mass product.

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bastille.
Now, even if your French accent ain't so red hot, I don't think there are too many folks even here in the linguistically stunted US who would pronounce
bastille
in such a way as to come a million miles within rhyming with Nashville.

 

Hey Y'all:

 

I am the creator of WikiRhymer and thought a little clarification might help you understand why certain things sometimes "rhyme" at WikiRhymer.com (and iWikiRhymer.com) and sometimes don't.

 

The "ville" in Nashville we have coded as an "ill" sound. The "ful" in "bashful" we have coded as an "ul" sound. Most US-English speakers would not pronounce "bashful" as "bashfille" wherein the "fille" rhymed with "Phil"). But, then perhaps some might. In some cases at "WR," you will find alternate rhyme sets (sets of words that rhyme), as in the case of "live," or more subtly, "again," or less subtly, "record."

 

At our newest version of WikiRhymer which is located at www.iWikiRhymer.com, we have added pretty robust near rhyme and end rhyme lists to in part try and capture or cope with alternate pronunciations.

 

Bottom line, rhyming is an art, not a science and no rhyming resource is going to be perfect, nor the same as other rhyming resources. What we do do at WikiRhymer, is give you the ability to add rhymes we missed and correct mistakes we made. We hope in this way to corral the power of many editors to produce the most comprehensive and "accurate" rhyming resource available.

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^Awesome^ I like it a lot. And well said regarding the very nature of rhyming dictionaries and their limitations.

 

To me, they are a spark. Sometimes I find the word from the dictionary, sometimes I pull the word out of thin air while looking through the dictionary. They help and are only a tool to be used as you see fit. Or not. Some like pneumatic nail guns. Some like framing with a hammer.

 

It's a tool I use. I think you've created a well thought out and unique rhyming dictionary.

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Hey Y'all:


I am the creator of WikiRhymer and thought a little clarification might help you understand why certain things sometimes "rhyme" at WikiRhymer.com (and iWikiRhymer.com) and sometimes don't.


The "ville" in Nashville we have coded as an "ill" sound. The "ful" in "bashful" we have coded as an "ul" sound. Most US-English speakers would not pronounce "bashful" as "bashfille" wherein the "fille" rhymed with "Phil"). But, then perhaps some might. In some cases at "WR," you will find alternate rhyme sets (sets of words that rhyme), as in the case of "
live
," or more subtly, "
again
," or less subtly, "
record
."


At our newest version of WikiRhymer which is located at
www.iWikiRhymer.com
, we have added pretty robust near rhyme and end rhyme lists to in part try and capture or cope with alternate pronunciations.


Bottom line, rhyming is an art, not a science and no rhyming resource is going to be perfect, nor the same as other rhyming resources. What we do do at WikiRhymer, is give you the ability to add rhymes we missed and correct mistakes we made. We hope in this way to corral the power of many editors to produce the most comprehensive and "accurate" rhyming resource available.

It's all good. :)

 

(However, I think you need to spend some time in Tennessee on that Nashville pronunciation. :D )

 

There actually are linguists and dialecticians who do study various pronunciations, so there is some science out there -- but the upshot of all that science is that folks' pronunciations vary widely, and in some places, neighborhoods can have their own, unique dialects and pronunciations (like, say, East End, London, the traditional home of Cockney culture).

 

Here in the States, we tend to be much more mobile and admixed culturally -- and growing up in Southern California in the 50s and 60s I got to hear wave after wave of immigrants from other national regions (not to mention other nations entirely) as they flooded to Cali. Plus, my grandfather was a huge fan of dialect humor and prided himself not only on his ability to converse in five different languages (English, German, Yiddish, Dutch, Spanish, and he tried adding French, but it seemed like mostly he got a beret out of his efforts ;) ) but also proud of his grasp of the accents from members of those cultures when they spoke English.

 

Of course, in the first half of the century, dialect and cultural humor was a huge part of radio and movies. (Not always to the credit of those engaging in it. Who hasn't cringed at some of the broad stereotypes in the movies? But there was a wide hunger for that sort of thing, particularly among immigrants.)

 

Anyhow, pronunciation is a fascinating topic.

 

A few months ago there was an epic thread at recording site, Gearslutz, on the pronunciation of one simple word, the German name, Neumann. While people were using sounds like type rhymes to try to suggest how they thought (or had thought) it was pronounced, even the introduction of a key representative of the famous microphone company of that name saying it in a trade show video didn't wrap up the discussion.

 

But what was particularly interesting during the sounds like rhyming phase of the discussion was that many of the Germans who were weighing in used sounds-like English examples that eventually seemed to indicate that their pronunciation of those words was quite different from many of the native English speakers (perhaps not surprisingly) but also that folks seemed to actually hear (or at least focus on) different aspects of the pronunciation in the audio recordings and come away with somewhat different takes on it. Fascinating stuff. Sort of like how some folks apparently don't hear the difference between wolf and woof.

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Hey Y'all:


I am the creator of WikiRhymer and thought a little clarification might help you understand why certain things sometimes "rhyme" at WikiRhymer.com (and iWikiRhymer.com) and sometimes don't.

 

 

why would create this thing? i mean, the bottom-line is it would take an enormous amount of time and there's no revenue stream. are you planning on selling it to merriam webster or something?

 

Also, can you please change the colors on WR2.0? The black and neon-green is too ninja turtles rather than prestigious and elite as befits a reference website.

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why would create this thing? i mean, the bottom-line is it would take an enormous amount of time and there's no revenue stream. are you planning on selling it to merriam webster or something?


Also, can you please change the colors on WR2.0? The black and neon-green is too ninja turtles rather than prestigious and elite as befits a reference website.

 

 

Are you somehow implying the Ninja Turtles aren't prestigious and elite?

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why would create this thing? i mean, the bottom-line is it would take an enormous amount of time and there's no revenue stream. are you planning on selling it to merriam webster or something?


Also, can you please change the colors on WR2.0? The black and neon-green is too ninja turtles rather than prestigious and elite as befits a reference website.

 

 

Thanks for taking the time to comment. Yes, it took a lot of time and effort (more than we ever thought) to get WR up and running and to completely overhaul it and turn it into WR 2.0.

 

As to "prestigious and elite as befits a reference website," we really don't think of ourselves as such. We think our target audience is songwriters and some poets, so we consciously choose a more "modern" look. Sorry it does not appeal to your taste. Maybe someday we can do skins!!

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Thanks for taking the time to comment. Yes, it took a lot of time and effort (more than we ever thought) to get WR up and running and to completely overhaul it and turn it into WR 2.0.


As to "prestigious and elite as befits a reference website," we really don't think of ourselves as such. We think our target audience is songwriters and some poets, so we consciously choose a more "modern" look. Sorry it does not appeal to your taste. Maybe someday we can do skins!!

I'd say props from Vint Cerf carry some weight. With those in the know, anyhow. ;)

 

I think straightforward design and ease of access and navigation are a lot more important than a slick appearance. There are a lot of slick looking sites out there that don't actually work very well.

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I'd say props from Vint Cerf carry some weight. With those in the know, anyhow.
;)

I think straightforward design and ease of access and navigation are a lot more important than a slick appearance. There are a lot of slick looking sites out there that don't actually
work
very well.

 

Well I think WR works well but suffers from 2 major design flaws:

 

1) the color scheme. It's ALWAYS hard to read light text on a dark background. It's just SO MUCH easier to read black text on a light background.

 

2) I have a huge screen, like 1920x1080. When WR2.0 lists the words, it goes across the entire screen, making it almost impossible to read. It would be much easier if the width of the text were limited to 960px or less.

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