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Songwriting Credits: A Question...


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I hope to be writing with another person soon and I have a question about credits. Actually I will be bringing her in to help finish lyrics. She plays as well, and it may change into something different but that's the starting goal. Anyway, usually when I 'write' a song I have the music and partial lyrics and melody. Is it acceptable to have the credits say "Lyrics by X and Y, Music by X". What would be proper?

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What about "Song X" by James Jacobe & Mildred Mulligan? No one seems to care about who wrote what. For that matter, except for the artists that write their own songs, how many songwriters of popular songs do you know?

 

Bottom-line: who cares besides the writers?

 

Sorry, I'm a bit cranky today.

 

John:cool:

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You can do howsoever you please. One song book has Smith/Jones; another has Lyrics by Smith, Music by Jones. It's also common to see the music's composer listed first and then the lyricist's second, as in Rogers & Hart or Rogers & Hammerstein, etc. Lennon/McCartney appear to have done it alphabetically without regards to who did what or even how much of what was done.

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Agreed Smith/Jones is good. Now there's the songwriting royalties issue. I've no idea how that works, but it is something to figure out if you expect to get paid royalties (or even a flat one time fee). That's when the amount of contribution will determine share of the royalties.

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Agreed Smith/Jones is good. Now there's the songwriting royalties issue. I've no idea how that works, but it is something to figure out if you expect to get paid royalties (or even a flat one time fee). That's when the amount of contribution will determine share of the royalties.

 

 

Usually 50/50 pertaining to royalties. It's good for the collab relationship.

 

John:cool:

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Agreed Smith/Jones is good. Now there's the songwriting royalties issue. I've no idea how that works, but it is something to figure out if you expect to get paid royalties (or even a flat one time fee). That's when the amount of contribution will determine share of the royalties.

 

 

I'll stick with the Smith/Jones model here too. Unless a real career develops. At this point, the most important thing is a productive relationship without any concerns. You want your partner to give of themselve freely. Throw it all in the pot...

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Royalties issue?...

 

I REALLY doubt it! I guess you never know, but I don't think the songs will sell, so that's not the issue, I just want to be fair. The way I see it (and bear in mind that I'm looking at things thru the blur of an ex-singer/collabrator taking ownership of songs that we wrote together) if I work with this new lyricist she will essentially be helping me finish the songs. Now I know that's a major thing, but it's probably not worth as much as the initial creative spark, if you will, to come up with the song in the first place, but maybe I'm wrong...:confused:

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I hear say that the Nashville method, is if you add a word or the whole lyric, credit gets split evenly (royalty-wise). I hear the California method splits by percentage. Smith75%/Jones-20%/ the coffee-girl-5% (for being sooooo cute).

 

But I just remember hearing that once. I can't remember any actual reference.

 

. . . . , so maybe I just made it up. (Could be 49.99% possible I did that)

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