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Disaster narrowly averted


Uncle Bastard

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Well, severe embarrassment anyway. I had recorded a demo song for my band last night, and was just about to post it to our shared Dropbox folder when I asked my girlfriend to have a listen. Thirty seconds in she said " that sounds like a Pink song. "

" Excuse me? " said I ( I do not listen to Pink ). " Yeah, it sounds like 'Trouble'."

So I searched on Youtube, and there it was, the main riff to Trouble, nearly identical to mine in all but key:facepalm::facepalm::facepalm: I have no idea how I came to accidentally do it- I don't pay attention to pop music on radio, TV or internet- I must have heard it at some point, perhaps in a shop, and subconsciously remembered it:mad:

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I'm joking a bit but if you're afraid of copying chord progressions and short melodies, I don't think you end up with too many options.

 

If I wrote a song and a section of it sounds suspiciously like another song that I wasn't even aware of but it goes with the song and it's best to keep it that way, I wouldn't change it. And I wouldn't stop playing it because some lame-o wrote a five-note section that sounded similar.

 

Yeah, there are possible legal issues but I'd be thrilled to be successful enough that they'd even come into play some day.

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you can copyright words, and a melody. Not sure about a riff? But I don't think so... And hey, the band's amazing, that's really what I think, btw, which one is Pink?

Words and melody, for sure. Most folks generally mean a melodic motif when they talk about a riff -- but the courts have generally consigned short bitsof melody to the gray area... but since even a rhythmic figure has in the past been held to be protected in some cases where such a rhythmic element is key to the song's identity -- I believe the example sometimes cited is "Big Noise from Winetka" -- I'd say a riff that a GF can identify and that the musician himself feels may be too similar is, indeed, too similar.

 

 

UB, do you mind if I email my latest songs to your GF for originality checks? :D

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Words and melody, for sure. Most folks generally mean a melodic motif when they talk about a riff -- but the courts have
generally
consigned short bitsof melody to the gray area... but since even a rhythmic figure has in the past been held to be protected
in some cases
where such a rhythmic element is key to the song's identity -- I believe the example sometimes cited is "Big Noise from Winetka" -- I'd say a riff that a GF can identify and that the musician himself feels may be too similar is, indeed, too similar.



UB,
do you mind if I email my latest songs to your GF for originality checks
?
:D

Feel free *grin* I'm not bothered about reproducing the riff, more about the rest of the band taking the piss at practice:p Anyway, I've already binned the guitar parts and recorded something completely different.

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Regardless of whether you'd be found guilty of plagiarizing, my philosophy on these things is that if you're getting sued, you were probably commercially successful and that makes whatever you did worth it.

I think you're kidding.

 

There's paying tribute to something, re-exploring and reinventing or subverting ideas, and a number of legit ways of building on the work and ideas of others -- but just copying (plagiarizing) is pretty damn lame.

 

But, of course, that's not what went on here. Still, if it might look like that to others, that alone is probably enough to encourage one to make some changes, I should think.

 

Who wants to look lame and unoriginal?

 

(Oh... wait... I just heard some pop radio... maybe I'm giving people too much credit! :D)

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I think, think, that "subconscious plagiarism" is an actual legal thing. Not legal in that it's allowed, but that it's actually a recognized thing in copyright law. That was what George Harrison was found guilty of in the "My Sweet Lord"/"He's So Fine" case. I think. I'm too lazy to do the research. So, if I'm wrong, I'm only subconsciously wrong.

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Well, severe embarrassment anyway. I had recorded a demo song for my band last night, and was just about to post it to our shared Dropbox folder when I asked my girlfriend to have a listen. Thirty seconds in she said " that sounds like a Pink song. "

" Excuse me? " said I ( I
do not
listen to Pink ). " Yeah, it sounds like 'Trouble'."

So I searched on Youtube, and there it was, the main riff to Trouble, nearly identical to mine in all but key:facepalm:
:facepalm:
:facepalm: I have no idea how I came to accidentally do it- I don't pay attention to pop music on radio, TV or internet- I must have heard it at some point, perhaps in a shop, and subconsciously remembered it:mad:

 

Are you serious???

 

Did you listen to the same song as me? THe Pink song is not what you would call original. The first guitar part is lifted from every Cars hit that still gets played on the radio. The second "riff" is nothing more than two beats of 2 chords alternated (g to c, ad infitum).

 

[video=youtube;IRz5XwSwY2w]

 

LOLOLOL - Pink nor her songwriters ever invented anything "original" and/or "unique"

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