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Song Video Production


rsadasiv

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Granted, I was learning some of the techiques at the time, so it took a while longer than it would now. That said, this still would take me 15 or so hours to put together even now. (was well over 30 at the time) I have no illusions about the grand potential of my music, so I have a hard time convincing myself the investment is worthwhile. If I were playing out and really trying to make a career out of it, then even this probably wouldn't be good enough.


Part of what made this one so complex was the fact that his video isn't in perfect time with the audio he sent.
:mad:
All the time stretching was a bitch and at that time I wasn't aware that if you stretch something it moves
everything
afterward. So I did some stretching and moved on only to realize later that the whole vid was now out of synch. I couldn't just undo it because it would have taken more time to redo everything I'd subsequently done than just fix the timing issues. Of course, youtube then fudged up things that were previously OK.
:facepalm:

 

Yeah, the cognitive dissonance between what I see his fingers doing and what I hear the piano doing is distracting. Still it's a good video. 15-30 hours per song is fine with me - I already spend 40-80 hours on a full audio production so 50% longer is not prohibitive.

 

So you had the camera up on a tripod while you tracked, then went into Premiere Elements and put the various audio clips together with a shade/fade/portrait effect, added titles, rendered to avi and uploaded to youtube?

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Are you even playing that song? At the :25 second mark it looks like you doing some fancy footwork but all I hear is a single note being played every couple measures.


Perhaps it has more to do with the mix, I can barely hear you in the chorus.

 

Nope. Hammond in the recording, pretending to play Rhodes in the video. I didn't have a real Hammond to bring to the shoot... he was clearly going for the aesthetics of a vintage 'anything'...

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Yeah, the cognitive dissonance between what I see his fingers doing and what I hear the piano doing is distracting. Still it's a good video. 15-30 hours per song is fine with me - I already spend 40-80 hours on a full audio production so 50% longer is not prohibitive.


So you had the camera up on a tripod while you tracked, then went into Premiere Elements and put the various audio clips together with a shade/fade/portrait effect, added titles, rendered to avi and uploaded to youtube?

 

Tripod? What tripod? I just find an appropirately heighted piece of furniture! :D

 

But yeah, that's the deal. You bring in whatever footage you have and treat it however you need - Movement? Size? Effects? Lighting? (that can be adjusted within APE even if it isn't perfect. Much better if it is correctly shot in the first place, but minor changes are hard to spot) Transitions? Titles/Credits? As I said above, the video Bee did would be very easy within the confines of the video software. All of the movement was done during filming and they didn't do any file reshaping or matting or anything complex. The only thing they did was tinker with transparency and lay some images on top of another. Given the original footage, I could bang that one out in less than 10 hours.

 

I render to Windows Media despite being a much larger file because it is a better looking product on youtube.

 

As for the collab video, it is even more off because he's something of an ad libber on the piano. Not only was it off time, but he wasn't even playing the same notes a good amount of the time.

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Amazingly, I like this song and video even less than her premier.

 

 

But... but... it's her moment! :)

 

But seriously, Friday was an obvious example of how important video has become. Not only are we wired for picture, but I find the logistics of youtube very intuitive. On many levels. From upload to distribution. An email and a link gets you there. Soon we'll most likely have embedded video in email. So even with my simple little follow-the-bouncing-ball demos I do, I find it's helpful to tap into the visual, no matter how basic the implementation. Basic doesn't have to be inane. Stick will use a static pic of his mug. Effective and simple.

 

Basic and aesthetically appropriate.

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Does anyone use green screen keying? Seems like a good way to deal with set design/background problems due to shooting in a messy basement.

 

 

I tried it once as a student and it was a pain. However others have had success with it as this thread shows. We have a modest green screen room here at work that was used for a project once and I think it must've worked ok or I would've heard about it LOL.

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I tried it once as a student and it was a pain. However others have had success with it as
shows. We have a modest green screen room here at work that was used for a project once and I think it must've worked ok or I would've heard about it LOL.

 

 

Yeah, I'm thinking about getting the same kit Jeff did.

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It seems like Premiere Elements must surely have an switchable option that either moves subsequent clips forward (as happened) or leaves them in place -- or alternately lets you lock clips to the timeline so they aren't pulled forward in what I think some NLVE's call 'magnetic mode.'

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Crap, maybe I need to read the thread again. Painting the wall is not an option due to the reality of my domestic situation - whatever I put up has to be able to come down and GO AWAY whenever we have overnight guests.

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I tried a green sheet. That was worthless as it was impossible for me to light it in such a way that the color looked uniform -- so the greenscreen effect was highly ineffective.

 

The color doesn't have to be green, of course, as long as your video editing software lets you pick a background color. (Vegas makes greenscreening really quite easy.)

 

But I found that a plain single color, not too-textured wall, in my case, white, worked really well. (Unfortunately, my tiny flat is not long on unbroken stretches of plain white wall, but I found about 3 feet that let me shoot a quick proof of concept vid -- and then crop the all heater at the edge of the frame out. ;) )

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Crap, maybe I need to read the thread again. Painting the wall is not an option due to the reality of my domestic situation - whatever I put up has to be able to come down and GO AWAY whenever we have overnight guests.

 

 

No, I was talking about my workplace. I think Jeff's solution comes with the sheet. (I think)

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I tried a green
sheet.
That was worthless as it was impossible for me to light it in such a way that the color looked uniform -- so the greenscreen effect was highly ineffective.


The color doesn't have to be green, of course, as long as your video editing software lets you pick a background color. (Vegas makes greenscreening really quite easy.)

 

 

I had the same issues with lighting and unfortunately had committed to a tight schedule and couldn't reshoot. So I wound up rotoscoping the figure in After Effects, pretty much frame by frame. I might as well have not used the green screen at all. Just imagine that there's a ton of rotoscoping that's done in big budget Hollywood movies where green screens are impractical, usually in large scale outdoor scenes...

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It seems like Premiere Elements must surely have an switchable option that either moves subsequent clips forward (as happened) or leaves them in place -- or alternately lets you lock clips to the timeline so they
aren't
pulled forward in what I think some NLVE's call 'magnetic mode.'

 

 

I would have thought so, but the guy who was walking me through it wasn't aware of it. The workaround I figured out was just to drag it to the end of the vid, resize it and drag it back.

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I would have thought so, but the guy who was walking me through it wasn't aware of it. The workaround I figured out was just to drag it to the end of the vid, resize it and drag it back.

Yeah... I'm not sure it does -- having never used it -- but it's hard to image it wouldn't.

 

It's funny how often people -- even pros -- don't know all the features their tools have. (And I'd be the first to admit I don't know my way around the scoring/notation features of my DAW, for instance. Of course, that all looks like chicken scratches to this standard notation-illitearte. :D )

 

I deal with a lot of Mac folks in my dayjob (and they all think it's strange that I use a PC for web design and work) but I'm often surprised at how little some of them know about their own platform. I'm often showing folks in the 3DW how to do stuff on their Macs. And it's not that I now my way around. I just figure there's got to be a way to do stuff I've been doing in Windows or Windows apps (for pushing 20 years) on the Mac. And, often, there is. ;) (Sometimes it's hard to find, even when googling, since terminologies are different.) But it is striking how little some folks know about the work tools they use every day -- and paid big money for.

 

 

That said, after long hearing about how amazing Final Cut Pro is as a non-linear vid editor (and I know it is, in many ways), when the brouhaha erupted over FCP X recently, I used that opportunity to see what new features it had added (along with all the pro features that went missing in this version) and I was pretty surprised to find that Vegas had had many of them for a long time.

 

As I think I may have noted, I'm just using the consumer version (~$100 US) -- so I don't know if the reportedly much more powerful Vegas Pro (~$600) does have some of them -- but the consumer version of Vegas is also missing a lot of the collaborative work flow options now missing from FCP X.

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I had the same issues with lighting and unfortunately had committed to a tight schedule and couldn't reshoot. So I wound up rotoscoping the figure in After Effects, pretty much frame by frame. I might as well have not used the green screen at all. Just imagine that there's a ton of rotoscoping that's done in big budget Hollywood movies where green screens are impractical, usually in large scale outdoor scenes...

 

Frankly, I was stunned at how well my white wall worked, particularly since it's kind of textured and someone along the way painted it with semi-gloss.

 

So I threw the green sheets into my linen drawer (like I've got a linen drawer :D ) and chalked that one up to experience.

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Yeah... I'm not sure it does -- having never used it -- but it's hard to image it
wouldn't.


It's funny how often people -- even pros -- don't know all the features their tools have. (And I'd be the first to admit I don't know my way around the scoring/notation features of my DAW, for instance. Of course, that all looks like
chicken scratches
to this standard notation-illitearte.
:D
)


I deal with a lot of Mac folks in my dayjob (and they
all
think it's strange that I use a PC for web design and work
) but I'm always surprised at how little they know about their own platform. I'm often showing folks in the 3DW how to do stuff on their Macs. And it's not that I now my way around. I just figure there's got to be a way to do stuff I've been doing in Windows for pushing 20 years on the Mac. And,
often
, there is.
;)
(Sometimes it's hard to find, even when googling, since terminologies are different.) But it is striking how little some folks know about the work tools they use every day -- and paid big money for.



That said, after long hearing about how amazing Final Cut Pro is as a non-linear vid editor (and I know it is, in many ways), when the brouhaha erupted over FCP X recently, I used that opportunity to see what new features it had added (along with all the pro features that went missing in this version) and I was pretty surprised to find that Vegas had had many of them for a long time.


As I think I may have noted, I'm just using the consumer version (~$100 US) -- so I don't know if the reportedly much more powerful Vegas Pro (~$600)
does
have some of them -- but the consumer version of Vegas is also missing a lot of the collaborative work flow options now missing from FCP X.

Oh geez... nevermind the PM I just sent you! :facepalm:

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If you are shooting yourself, what do you use for monitoring?

 

 

The viewscreen on my camera flips around. It isn't all that clear from a distance and it eliminates roughly 5% of the filmed outer edges from view, but its the best I got.

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