Jump to content

Do you get a rush when you're writing a new song?


New Trail

Recommended Posts

  • Members

 

I do! There's nothing else quite like it (except possibly playing a lead solo on stage that works and comes together especially well).

 

 

No, not really...I'm not sure if "rush" is the right word, BUT

I DO get a rush when a song stalls not wanting to be finished and eventually I figure it out,

THAT can be a rush, it doesn't happen that often. I'm trying to learn to save those stalled songs for co-writes,

but I never do.....I just keep finishing everything.

 

In my case it becomes an OCD type thing where I obsess over finishing for days and days whether I'm "writing" or not...so now that I think about it, it's probably similar to what you're describing but just manifests a little differently.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

I get more of a rush when I start recording it and it starts to come together.

 

 

Im with you here! I should really spend more time on my "writing" . I just want to write something/anything so i can start the recording process and this is when the fun and the rush starts

 

I lay down chords and a rough vocal and usually i start hearing all the other parts in my head.... as im putting one part down im excited to quickly move on to the next.... usually get the whole thing done in a few hours

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Im with you here! I should really spend more time on my "writing" . I just want to write something/anything so i can start the recording process and this is when the fun and the rush starts


I lay down chords and a rough vocal and usually i start hearing all the other parts in my head.... as im putting one part down im excited to quickly move on to the next....
usually get the whole thing done in a few hours

 

 

No kidding. I'm hoping once I master my equipment, I can do the same... I want to be efficient.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

I get the rush early. As I'm driving around starting to hear the tune in my head. Then as I start getting the initial lyrics and any twist I can manage. Any momentum lyrically is a rush for me. Then again as I finally sit down with piano or guitar and start playing it for the first time. The rush, I guess, comes from hearing it in my head and getting excited. The recording then, for me, becomes more of a formality.

 

That's kind of weird I guess.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

I get the rush early. As I'm driving around starting to hear the tune in my head. Then as I start getting the initial lyrics and any twist I can manage. Any momentum lyrically is a rush for me. Then again as I finally sit down with piano or guitar and start playing it for the first time. The rush, I guess, comes from hearing it in my head and getting excited. The recording then, for me, becomes more of a formality.


That's kind of weird I guess.

 

Without delving too far down into my psyche, I think the lack of rush for me when I'm writing has to do with confidence. It's not until I actually hear it playing back at me do I really start to appreciate that it may actually be good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Without delving too far down into my psyche, I think the lack of rush for me when I'm writing has to do with confidence. It's not until I actually hear it playing back at me do I really start to appreciate that it may
actually
be good.

 

 

same here - its not until my simple idea is buried under layers of simple ideas that i feel i have achieved something of worth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

I get the rush early. As I'm driving around starting to hear the tune in my head. Then as I start getting the initial lyrics and any twist I can manage. Any momentum lyrically is a rush for me. Then again as I finally sit down with piano or guitar and start playing it for the first time. The rush, I guess, comes from hearing it in my head and getting excited. The recording then, for me, becomes more of a formality.


That's kind of weird I guess.

 

 

If so, then I'm weird, too, cause that sounds exactly like what I do!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

The recording then, for me, becomes more of a formality.

That's kind of weird I guess.

 

 

I feel the similar...

The recording is secondary and is just icing

has nothing to do with the composition

 

although as I'm finishing carving a final mix on a full production and all of the parts start to become audible I start to get a little giddy (which I suppose is a rush)....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I'm constantly getting rushes. When the idea first perks up. When I make some headway on a phrase that had eluded me. When I get a good track down. When I'm in the car and an idea for another layer cuts through the haze.

 

It's not all rainbows and unicorns, though. Right now I'm in the middle of two seperate songs that sound great in my head but won't seem to materialize on Cubase. Its frustrating and actually is making me want to avoid recording. I should probably just move onto something new and come back later.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

There's a neurological basis for all this. Dopamine, one of the brain's feel-good chemicals, is released when we begin to sense a pattern emerging from a sea of impressions. This not only relates to the process of writing songs, but of just listening to the.

 

With some of us, the dopamine release seems to be more apparent once there are more parts of the pattern to deal with (i.e., arranging and recording). With others it comes when those first glimmers of the song start to tickle our brains.

 

Paul Simon has said that he has to keep himself from doing endless rewrites, because he realized at one point that it was becoming more like an OCD behavior than a necessary part of the songwriting process.

 

Shifting patterns, man. That's the rush, both in writing and listening to music.

 

LCK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

...Paul Simon has said that he has to keep himself from doing endless rewrites, because he realized at one point that it was becoming more like an OCD behavior than a necessary part of the songwriting process....

 

 

That's interesting, and explains why creative people often feel that their creation is never truly finished, that they can always make an improvement in some way. I know that when I come up with a better or more perfect word or phrase for a lyric it makes my day, or at least my minute!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Once I was driving down the road, saw a car wreck on some ice, felt goosebumps on my arms and the next thing I knew the entire last verse of I song I had been working on for a year just poped in to my head all at once. Do I get a rush, oh yeah, but when it's really good, I get goosebumps.

 

Recording for me is more frustration than fun, at least until that point that it starts to really come together. I usually get some rough tracks down then walk away from it for a while. When I listen to it again, I either get that rush and finish it up quickly, or I wonder what I was thinking and throw it all out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Once I was driving down the road, saw a car wreck on some ice, felt goosebumps on my arms and the next thing I knew the entire last verse of I song I had been working on for a year just poped in to my head all at once.

 

 

That's an amazing story.

 

And there's also a scientific basis for it happening that quickly and that suddenly in that kind of situation.

 

LCK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...