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In appreciation of meaningless lyrics


oldgitplayer

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These are a few I can think of:

 

Tutti-frutti ......Awopbopaloobop alopbamboom

 

Fa fa fa fa fa-fa fa fa, fa fa fa fa fa-fa fa. (can't think of the song title)

 

Da doo ron ron ron, da doo ron ron

 

Hey Jude........na-na-na na-na-na-na

 

Papa-ooma-mow-mow, papa-ooma-mow-mow

 

The Boxer.......Li la li li li li li li li li, li la li li la li li li li li li li li la li

 

Paul Simon wrote the verses of the Boxer first, but couldn't come up with a chorus lyric, so they did the Li la li.

He said that the unseen advantage was that even when they play in foreign language countries, everyone sings along with the chorus.

 

Similarly, audiences always join in with the Hey Jude ending.

 

And not forgetting Christmas.......Tra la la la la la la la la.

 

Any more to add?

Any of your own songs?

 

Which reminds me of the time the Alsation went into a Post Office to send a telegram. He wrote out his message and handed it to the PO assistant behind the counter.

He read through the 'Woofs' and said to the Alsation, "The cost of the telegram allows for 20 words. You've got 19. Would you like to add another woof?"

The Alsation took the telegram form and read it through again, and with a perplexed look replied, "But then it wouldn't make any sense".

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Those crazy Alsatians. (Note the spelling.)

 

Yeah, the i-o-n ending indicates a nominalization, a verb that's been turned into a noun, as in "I can't get no satisfaction," where the verb to satisfy is nominalized. (I had a Dalmatian dog who lived to be 15, and it always irritated me when I saw it spelled Dalmation.)

 

Oh, by the way. The joke made me laugh.

 

Now where were we? Oh, yeah, nonsense lyrics...

 

I'm not sure this qualifies, but I've always loved Donovan's song "Barrabajagal." That word is actually the name of the title character, but the hook goes, "Goo, goo, goo goo Barabajagal was his name now..."

 

[video=youtube;4oROZjMuFu4]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4oROZjMuFu4

 

LCK

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Those crazy Alsatians. (Note the spelling.)


I'm not sure this qualifies, but I've always loved Donovan's song "Barrabajagal." That word is actually the name of the title character, but the hook goes, "Goo, goo, goo goo Barabajagal was his name now..."LCK

 

 

Thanks - spelling duly noted. It looked wrong when I wrote it, but I couldn't see where.

 

I think anything qualifies - no rules with meaningless.

 

I haven't listened to Barabajagal for some decades now as I don't listen to the radio much except sometimes when I'm driving.

I hadn't appreciated that Micky Most had pulled in the Jeff Beck Group for it.

It's a remarkable groove on acoustic guitar alone, and Jeff and Ronnie really take it to the next level.

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I hadn't appreciated that Micky Most had pulled in the Jeff Beck Group for it.

It's a remarkable groove on acoustic guitar alone, and Jeff and Ronnie really take it to the next level.

 

 

Apparently there are a couple of these clips on Youtube, with Donovan talking about how a particular song came about, production-wise. "Hurdy Gurdy Man," for instance, featured Jimmie Page on guitar, John Paul Jones on bass, and John Bonham on drums. In other words, it was the first Led Zeppelin song ever released, but with Donovan, not Robert Plant, on vocals.

 

Kinda cool to know that now, huh? (I mean, if you didn't already.)

 

[video=youtube;HNpj8274bio]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNpj8274bio

 

LCK

 

PS: "Hurdy Gurdy Man" came out in May of 1968. "Born to Be Wild" came out a good two months later. This would mean that "Hurdy-Gurdy Man" preceded "Born to Be Wild" as the very first heavy metal song.

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No - I didn't know that the young Zep were studio musicians on Hurdy Gurdy man either.

 

I was in to Donovan in a big way, and covered a lot of his material in my Coffee house gigs in 66 and 67.

I learned all my picking styles from his albums. My voice and vocal range worked well with his material and his keys.

 

They were good times coupled with an innocent naivety that we would make the world a better place. Well - we certainly got that one wrong.

But I speculate that it might have gotten worse even sooner than it did if our generation hadn't been actively involved in change.

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Sometimes just a simple whoa-wah-oh-oh can be an important part of a hook.

 

I love the way The Black Keys do it. Almost everyone of their tunes has some sort of ah-oh bit. They're all different and just part of the song.

 

Check this vid out at :58 or so to see what I mean...

 

[video=youtube;a_426RiwST8]

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It is something I've often thought I should try and incorporate into my own writing but have never done

 

I develop all my vocal melodies singing meaningless lyrics over the top of chord rhythms.

A lot of the time I prefer the meaningless stuff to the final developed lyric. It's fun, and carries no responsibility with it.

 

So you've given me an idea - maybe I can try incorporating some of the initial stuff into the finished lyric.......:idea: thanks for that.

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What'ya mean meaningless? Those lyrics mean plenty: They mean it's time for all of us to sing along now cause we're having a good time!!!!!

 

But seriously - those lyrics were put in songs that were designed to be played to a room full of people, either people dancing to a band getting down or sitting around smoking a doobie and grooving to the record. Babble lyrics have a utilitarian purpose in context: We all know the melody so we can all sing together.

 

And such lyrics are good when you're just too lazy to come up with extra words.

 

LIke I think the song you're referring to is Otis Redding's Sad Song - Fa Fa Fa. The story on that one if I recall is Otis - who never studied music - used to give his horn section direction for their parts that way: He'd go to them Like this - "FA FA FA FA FA." My guess is that ended up in the song the way it did because he was directing his horns to literally play that part like that - and then he or someone else realized it was totally cool to make that the chorus of the song. There's kind of an inside joke going on. He's directing the band to repeat what he just did like he always did - but telling the audience to respond too. Totally cool. That's an important song for me - I only heard it the first time sometime in the last 12 months. It really stunned me - the lesson there about feeling over substance and the power of simple compelling little tricks like that. It's built off an Doo-Whop Ice Cream Chord Progression.

 

I don't know what the story was behind the Happy Song Dum Dum. Don't think it's as good as the Sad Song. But I like that one too, though.

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Sometimes just a simple whoa-wah-oh-oh can be an important part of a hook.


I love the way The Black Keys do it. Almost everyone of their tunes has some sort of ah-oh bit. They're all different and just part of the song.

 

 

You're right about the hook - a real get up and move kinda song.

Loved watching the guy dance.

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I remember this one:


na na na na na na hey hey good bye


Paul Leka

 

 

I don't remember this, but the question should be asked - Did the Hare Krishna movement lift the melody for their chant from this, or did the songwriter lift it from the Hare Krishna mob?

Alternatively, did they both lift it from somewhere else?

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LIke I think the song you're referring to is Otis Redding's Sad Song - Fa Fa Fa. The story on that one if I recall is Otis - who never studied music - used to give his horn section direction for their parts that way: He'd go to them Like this - "FA FA FA FA FA." My guess is that ended up in the song the way it did because he was directing his horns to literally play that part like that - and then he or someone else realized it was totally cool to make that the chorus of the song. There's kind of an inside joke going on. He's directing the band to repeat what he just did like he always did - but telling the audience to respond too. Totally cool. That's an important song for me - I only heard it the first time sometime in the last 12 months. It really stunned me - the lesson there about feeling over substance and the power of simple compelling little tricks like that. It's built off an Doo-Whop Ice Cream Chord Progression.

 

 

Thanks for identifying this song for me - it was niggling in my memory banks, but not coming through.

Interesting backstory to how the song came to be like that.

There was only, and ever will be one Otis.

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