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Any of you folks use Jango to see if anyone likes your tunes?


MrKnobs

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Assuming they don't make up the stats, their reports are really useful. You can see which of your songs people like best, where your band is liked, the age and gender demographics.

 

I just started using Jango, but it seems very useful so far. :thu:

 

Terry D.

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What do you think of them, Terry? What do they offer an artist that being on ReverbNation or Bandcamp on the one hand or Last.fm on the other doesn't?

 

I did come across a warning in Wikipedia that there is no way of deleting your membership, that you have to contact administrators by email to request they delete your account. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jango_(website)

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What do you think of them, Terry? What do they offer an artist that being on ReverbNation or Bandcamp on the one hand or Last.fm on the other doesn't?


I did come across a warning in Wikipedia that there is no way of deleting your membership, that you have to contact administrators by email to request they delete your account.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jango_(website
)

 

I'll have to look at the wikipedia entry, because I seem to have signed up with Jango at some point in the past and the only artifact of that experience is a Jango spam rule in my mailbox. :o

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I'm finding Jango very interesting so far.

 

My current band is called Telling Stories and is a songwriting experiment between myself and Julie Nolen, my songwriting partner. I've been a musician for many years, and I'm at least semi-fluent in many styles and have a lot of connections with musicians much better than myself who are also fluent in various styles. Julie and I decided to write songs in a variety of genres, then see what people prefer us doing. We play out several times a week and get some idea of what goes over in Austin, TX but we'd also like to know what "ordinary people" in other parts of the country like and dislike about us.

 

From the listeners' perspective, Jango is much like Pandora. The listener chooses some favorite bands and/or songs, and Jango plays the chosen music and some additional music that Jango thinks the listener might also like. Unlike Pandora, which chooses unknown bands through a very particular process, rejecting most, Jango's unknown bands have simply paid to be included.

 

From the unknown band's perspective, it's a way to get your songs heard, and, more importantly, to get some potentially useful feedback. Here's an overview of the sort of information Jango collects and provides to musicians:

 

JangoReports.jpg

 

Jango reports how many times each song you submit has been played to date, how many people "LIKED" it, who "FAN'd" you as a result, how many times your profile was viewed. "Organic Plays" are also tallied, an organic play being a play that was requested specifically by the listener.

 

The artist is allowed to choose what geographic area(s) the songs are played in, though some global play will happen even if you simply say US or even pick a particular state. Throughout the day, Jango will report each listen and email you when a fan is made or an email address is shared. You can see the most recent people who have listened, and it looks like this:

 

JangoListeners.jpg

 

More to come on the next post...

 

Terry D.

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The first and possibly most important report that Jango provides is a simple list of how many times each of your songs was played and how many of those times the LIKE button was pressed.

 

Plays.jpg

 

Strangely, the key metric (in my view) is missing, which is what percent of the time a listener LIKEd each song. This normalizes between the songs as some may have been played more times than others. I simply download all this data into an Excel spreadsheet and graph it myself:

 

JangoStats.jpg

 

From what I've read by Jango users, 4% like is a pretty decent level for a song to receive, i.e. one like out of 25 plays. More than that is a good song. Judging the above graph by that criterion, looks like "Only One" is one of our most liked songs. That's quite a surprise to us, as we never play Only One at our live shows.

 

But who's doing all that LIKE-ing?

 

Jango gives three graphs of age/sex demographics. The first is the distribution for people who heard your song, the second is the distribution for people who liked it, and the third is a combined graph that normalizes the like distribution to consider the population sampled.

 

Here's the first of the three, the total distribution (in percent) of age and gender for those who heard "Only One."

 

Only1Listeners.jpg

 

You can see from the graph that we had mostly female listeners across a broad range of ages from teenagers to retired folks. Why mostly females? We'll talk about that in my next post.

 

First let's look at which of all those people pressed the like button.

 

Only1AgeGender.jpg

 

 

Wow, that wasn't expected. Mostly liked by teenage girls! So if we divide the number of people in each age group that LIKE'd us by the number of people who in each age/gender group who HEARD us we get the normalized probability of which group would most likely enjoy this song, even more drastically skewed toward the kiddos:

 

Only1Normalized.jpg

 

Next post we'll look at what most likely caused this.

 

Terry D.

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We're looking at the unexpected result for our song, "Only One," which appears to be a hit with girls under 18 and pretty much no one else, and to understand why that might be the case.

 

First of all, here's the song if you care to listen: Only One

 

The listener hears that playing, and this pops up for them to have a look at us, rate us, visit our website, Facebook, MySpace and / or buy our stuff immediately.

 

PromoModule.jpg

 

I'd say "Only One" is kind of a jazzy, mellow tune with a standard pop lyrical theme, basically, "I'm the only one who really loves you." Young girls tend to be romantics, maybe the lyrics and the fact it's sung by a young woman resonate with those listeners. :idk:

 

But there's something else that has a lot to do with it also. We chose artists that we thought sound a little like us, and hoped that people who like those artists would also like us. Those are the people who got to hear Only One, our targeted listeners. Jango furnishes a list of the favorite groups of those who liked "Only One." As Jango puts it, "if you got together a room full of your fans, and asked them what other groups they like when they're not listening to your music, this is a good idea of what you'd find."

 

Only1Fans.jpg

 

The asterisks are by the artists we chose, the artists without asterisks are ones we didn't think of, or didn't choose. They're listed in order of how many of our "fans" chose them from top to bottom. Looking at it another way, people looking for Rihanna and hearing us instead, were most likely to click the LIKE button.

 

When I showed that graph over in MusicBiz, someone asked the insightful question of whether it was maybe because young girls were more likely to click the LIKE button than anyone else. I don't know the percentage of young girls pressing LIKE vs any other age/gender group (maybe Jango does) so all I could reply is that if they do for "Only One" they didn't for another of our songs, "Salesman," demographic probability shown on this graph:

 

Salesman

 

ProbSalesman.jpg

 

This song looks to do well in nursing homes! :eek:

 

More as I get more results. Thanks for reading so far. :)

 

Terry D.

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Great info, Terry. I like a guy who wants to know what he's getting for his money -- and wrings it for every last drop of value.

 

My worry from reading your write-up is that Jango may draw a distinctly skewed listener base. I mean, how do they draw their listeners and what's the appeal -- free music is hardly a draw any more. So you have to wonder about who all is listening in the first place. Do they make those demographic data available? (I always wanted to use data, a plural, correctly, but I've always forgotten to do it 'til now. I feel reborn.)

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Great info, Terry. I like a guy who wants to know what he's getting for his money -- and wrings it for every last drop of value.


My worry from reading your write-up is that Jango may draw a distinctly skewed listener base. I mean, how do they draw their listeners and what's the appeal -- free music is hardly a draw any more. So you have to wonder about who all is listening in the first place. Do they make those demographic data available? (I always wanted to use
data
, a plural, correctly, but I've always forgotten to do it 'til now. I feel reborn.)

 

That's a good question. All that I do know about the listeners is their location, gender, age, and what other artists they like. That information streams constantly as my songs are listened to. The locations certainly make sense. As with Second Life, the daily routine sees waves of people from the various countries waxing and waning depending on how likely it is for a person to be awake and listening to music at the time of day it is in Bogota Columbia or Brisbane Australia.

 

Of course all the other information is "self identified" as the pollsters call it.

 

I did consider the (very unlikely) possibility that it's all made up. Just for fun I asked some of my local and international friends to log on to Jango and create a station that would be likely to incude us, then report back to me on it. Jango's listener report and my friends' reports squared up. Additionally, I see no obvious unnatural patterns in the listener data nor in who likes our songs compared to what we know from our sales. So they could be generating some of the data illicitly, I guess, but it's clearly not all made up. Besides, it seems pretty easy and nearly free for them to "crowd source."

 

The question you raise, though, is whether there's some underlying skew in the demographic of the listeners.

 

The most obvious one is the age demographic. All of the results show Jango's characteristic bell curve distribution around 25 - 30 year olds. I asked the Jango live help dude about this, and he basically said, "Yeah, that pretty much reflects everyone who listens to music on the internet which I'd think you want as those are the people who you'll be selling your music to over the Internet." Good point!

 

I should underscore at this point that nearly every page in Jango has a small popup at the bottom titled "LIVE HELP!" and the chat folks answer it immediately or sooner every time I've used it - which was abundantly when I first signed up and started getting results. :lol:

 

To demonstrate this graphically let's take my two songs that have the most listens so far.

 

Miss You

 

Listener Demographics (showing the bell curve centered at 25-34)

 

MissYouListeners.jpg

 

Miss You Age / Sex Demographics (those who LIKEd Miss You)

 

MissYouAgeGender.jpg

 

It seems pretty clear from the above charts that Miss You is liked by an older crowd than the overall demographic of Jango Listeners, keeping in mind that the overall demographic of listeners to our tunes was strongly affected by our choices of what bands we sound like. This comparison argues we need to drop some of our "sound like" artists that appeal primarily to the kids, at least for this song.

 

Lost Faith

 

Listener Demographic for Lost Faith (orchestral version)

 

LostFaithListeners.jpg

 

The listener distribution is pretty similar to that of Miss You as shown above. I should point out that the female listeners are more numerous, probably because at first we mostly chose female artists for our "sound alikes." Later, I realize that wasn't optimal. As you get more plays, Jango points out the artists you should probably add which is simply the favorite artists of listeners who LIKEd us that we hadn't already thought of and chosen.

 

Age / Gender Distribution of Listeners who LIKEd Lost Faith

 

LostFaithAgeGender.jpg

 

Unlike Miss You, this graphic shows that our song Lost Faith is strongly liked by the narrow group females between ages 25-34. This is not a bad thing, and also not a surprise based on our live shows and our CD and download sales to date.

 

Finally, if any of you can think of a question about demographics other than age, gender, and geographic location that might be important, please post your thoughts in this thread and I'll ask Jango. I can't think of any that might lie outside the Jango rep's comment pointing out that these are also the people I'd likely be selling to. I'll think about that some more also.

 

:wave:

 

Terry D.

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There's a band called Telling Stories on iTunes. They have two CDs --
Greyhound
and
Dirty Little Secrets.


LCK

 

That's us. :)

 

By the way, if it's possible and you wouldn't mind, could you post the link that goes directly to our iTunes sales? I don't have iTunes on my computer but I'd love to create a button in Jango that goes directly there. Thanks if you can! :)

 

Terry D.

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No worries, thanks!
:)

I guess I'll have to finally bite the bullet and install iTunes on one of my computers.


Terry D.

Do it on one you don't need running efficiently. I put it on my good laptop (so I could deal with iTunes' blog listing requirements) and it brought a decently optimized machine with a Pentium M processor to its knees. It's just a big, bloated piece of crapware. It makes WMP look slim. If maybe not slick. :D [PS... I'm using WMP as a benchmark of dorkiness. I never, ever use it.]

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That's exactly why I don't want to install it! :eek:

 

Also, I worry that iTunes will coopt some of my audio file types just as QuickTime does and I'll have to manually change them all back. :freak:

 

Terry D.

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