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Jumping Channels on Fender Amps


Mikoo69
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I have a vintage 1966 Fender Bassman head. I have heard about jumping channels on these (plug into input 1 of normal channel, cable out of input 2 into input 1 of second channel).

 

What are the benefits of doing this?

 

Does channel 2 act as a master volume?

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Typically on Fenders when you plug into both inputs of one channel there is a cut in the input to that channel, so you don't get much extra boost from using it. The channel doesn't really add a gain stage in series but another stage in parallel which increases gain minimally. It never gave me much worth doing it. 4 input Marshalls respond alot better to it. What I have done on Fenders is rodded them so the output of Channel 1 is fed into Channel 2 so the gain is in series. A decent tech can do this mod. They also used to make a device called an Ice Cube that you could put on Fenders that have reverb that allows that stage to add gain. A poor mans method was an RCA jumper but you get some screeching if you dial up the reverb too much. The best method is to just buy a good distortion box as Fenders take them well and there are so many nice ones now days.

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Typically on Fenders when you plug into both inputs of one channel there is a cut in the input to that channel, so you don't get much extra boost from using it. The channel doesn't really add a gain stage in series but another stage in parallel which increases gain minimally. It never gave me much worth doing it. 4 input Marshalls respond alot better to it. What I have done on Fenders is rodded them so the output of Channel 1 is fed into Channel 2 so the gain is in series. A decent tech can do this mod. They also used to make a device called an Ice Cube that you could put on Fenders that have reverb that allows that stage to add gain. A poor mans method was an RCA jumper but you get some screeching if you dial up the reverb too much. The best method is to just buy a good distortion box as Fenders take them well and there are so many nice ones now days.

 

 

I *think* the reason that you get a small loss in volume is that on Fenders with Reverb, the 2 'channels' are out of phase. That's not the case with the bassman, 'cause it doesn't have a reverb circuit.

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I have a vanamps solemate/reverb mate. it has the option for wet dry outputs or a blended output. should that just go at the end of my chain before it hits input one, or should i put it in between the inputs in the jumpered chain? also same goes for an EQ pedal?

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I *think* the reason that you get a small loss in volume is that on Fenders with Reverb, the 2 'channels' are out of phase. That's not the case with the bassman, 'cause it doesn't have a reverb circuit.

 

This is correct.

 

If the amp has reverb on channel 2, forget it unless you have a phase reverser, but if it doesn't, it's like jumpering the inputs on a Marshall or Hiwatt.

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Jumping channels sounds awesome. I built a sunn model t clone (its almost identical to a tweed bassman) and i always run both the channels at once. The normal channel is to dark on its own, and the bright channel is too fizzy. Combine them and its delicious.

 

 

Typically on Fenders when you plug into both inputs of one channel there is a cut in the input to that channel, so you don't get much extra boost from using it. The channel doesn't really add a gain stage in series but another stage in parallel which increases gain minimally. It never gave me much worth doing it. 4 input Marshalls respond alot better to it. What I have done on Fenders is rodded them so the output of Channel 1 is fed into Channel 2 so the gain is in series. A decent tech can do this mod. They also used to make a device called an Ice Cube that you could put on Fenders that have reverb that allows that stage to add gain. A poor mans method was an RCA jumper but you get some screeching if you dial up the reverb too much. The best method is to just buy a good distortion box as Fenders take them well and there are so many nice ones now days.

 

Uhm. Not quite. Parallel gain stages give you MORE gain than cascaded gain stages, but less distortion.

 

Think of it. JCM800 is input stage --> less powerful secondary stage, because in cascading amps, too much gain sounds like overdistorted crap. So in cascading, less gain can be used while attaining more dirt.

 

Bassman has 2 input stages, both of which have more gain than the jcm800 secondary stage. So it has more gain, but less dirt.

 

If you cascade a superlead or bassman, you'll notice that it will probably get a lot dirtier than your regular jcm800 because of the jcm800's compensation on the second gainstage to reduce gain and reduce feedback. Thats why the randy rhoads superlead is SO distorted, it uses 2 input stages as gainstages.

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how should i hook up the vansamp if i am jumping channels?

 

with the van amps i can have the dry output go to the bass channel and the wet channel go to the normal channel? is that the same as jumping, and also give me control of blend of verb?

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