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Hardest job in a band


jenksdrummer
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I hold my meter pretty well on my own, however I'm easily pushed by other members. That's my biggest fault. Bass player called me out on it on Man in the Box - during the guitar solo, the bass line is the verse then the bridge parts - the bridge is a series of 8th note bass runs...and he took off on it, and I went with him, then yanked him back. He said, man, we fished tailed on that one...meaning that, because tempo/meter is my job, that I didn't hold my own...


Him and our old guitar player were HORRIBLE at that - then I got a metronome and the guitar player threw a fit because I was locking onto the metronome and to hell with what they were doing. Songs that we were tight as hell on before, now, no longer were tight.


Anyhow...

 

 

Tell him not to fucking nut up on that part next time, then! :o

 

We all know how easy it is to subconsciously speed shit up, particularly after transitions in the song, but if he wants to get all anal about it, fuck it, at rehearsals, become a nazi dick about it then and stop the fucking song every time they start to speed up and bitch them out about it, see how they like it. Not a bad idea, anyway, because it IS ultimately the drummer's job to hold the meter.

 

Man, the more I hear about your bass player, the more I want to take a road trip and throat-punch that fucker for you! :facepalm:

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Drumming is unbelievably hard. It requires excellent coordination and physical stamina. A bad drummer makes the whole band sound sloppy.

 

This is certainly true - and I've only dabbled in the physical art of drumming (just enough to be able to program more realistic MIDI parts),

 

However, for an average band, would the audience be more annoyed at a drummer replaced by a backing track/MIDI, or a singer? (regardless of how lousy that idea is).

 

Actually, scratch that.

 

Half the pop artists are lip-syncing their stuff.

 

 

It's all hard :)

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Tell him not to fucking nut up on that part next time, then!
:o

We all know how easy it is to subconsciously speed shit up, particularly after transitions in the song, but if he wants to get all anal about it, fuck it, at rehearsals, become a nazi dick about it then and stop the fucking song every time they start to speed up and bitch them out about it, see how
they
like it. Not a bad idea, anyway, because it IS ultimately the drummer's job to hold the meter.


Man, the more I hear about your bass player, the more I want to take a road trip and throat-punch that fucker for you!
:facepalm:

 

It's all a different perspective...so I do what I can to keep my cool - yesterday was me losing my cool over it, and had he not called me at 3:30 (I was pissed enough I left work at 2:30 to prep myself, he was done at work at 3:30), I would have pulled my shit out and not looked back. He explained things carefully and why he said what he said...and given it was on facebook with the whole band, I said he "had to" do it because the singer is always getting in other peoples shit (like tweaking the guitarists EQ because he thinks he can make him sound better...when the guitarist isn't there) - so it was more for him to see that he's (singer) not the only one to get swatted verbally for stepping into someone else's instrument.

 

Anyhow, that's in the past. Regarding the speeding shit up - we recorded a practice a few weeks ago - what I found is that on some songs we were consistently 7% too fast. Next practice, I brought it down to about 3% under...and everyone complained that it was dragging. I did that on purpose, because the idea there was to set the bar low and next time play it where it should be, and it won't feel like it's dragging. A little psychology there! :)

 

It worked - we're playing them at what feels like the right tempo. We'll have another recorded session in the near future to see where we're at.

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It's all a different perspective...so I do what I can to keep my cool - yesterday was me losing my cool over it, and had he not called me at 3:30 (I was pissed enough I left work at 2:30 to prep myself, he was done at work at 3:30), I would have pulled my shit out and not looked back. He explained things carefully and why he said what he said...and given it was on facebook with the whole band, I said he "had to" do it because the singer is always getting in other peoples shit (like tweaking the guitarists EQ because he thinks he can make him sound better...when the guitarist isn't there) - so it was more for him to see that he's (singer) not the only one to get swatted verbally for stepping into someone else's instrument.


Anyhow, that's in the past. Regarding the speeding shit up - we recorded a practice a few weeks ago - what I found is that on some songs we were consistently 7% too fast. Next practice, I brought it down to about 3% under...and everyone complained that it was dragging. I did that on purpose, because the idea there was to set the bar low and next time play it where it should be, and it won't feel like it's dragging. A little psychology there!
:)

It worked - we're playing them at what feels like the right tempo. We'll have another recorded session in the near future to see where we're at.

 

 

Wow... man, your singer and I would have some very loud words over fucking with my shit behind my back! :lol:

 

As for the tempo, the main thing is that it remains consistent through the song. You can play a song a little faster or slower, if that's what everybody agrees they want to do (some songs actually sound better live with a little bump in tempo), as long as you don't end up at a different tempo than you started at! I like the whole psychological warfare angle, though! :thu:

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If we're talking strictly a cover band, my order goes as follows(Hardest to easiest):

 

Guitar

Bass

Singer

Drummer

 

And here are my reasons:

 

Clearly it's easier to learn covers on bass, than it is on guitar. I think anyone would agree to that...even bass players. Singers only have to learn words and melodies. They can do that in their car on the way to work. They did get the nod up from the drummer just for the fact that they also have to entertain the crowd the whole time. Drummer gets the "easiest" nod, simply because they can also practice in the car, at work, at school, wherever they can listen to the music. Guitar players, and bass players cannot.

 

Drummers do have the most physically demanding job in the band though.

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I'm the primary songwriter, guitarist, money/merch manager, practice space owner, and babysitter for the other dumbasses in my band ( I mean that in the most endearing way :lol:). I would say I've got a bigger workload than the rest of them, but I'm a control freak and prefer it this way.

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If we're talking strictly a cover band, my order goes as follows(Hardest to easiest):


Guitar

Bass

Singer

Drummer


And here are my reasons:


Clearly it's easier to learn covers on bass, than it is on guitar. I think anyone would agree to that...even bass players. Singers only have to learn words and melodies. They can do that in their car on the way to work. They did get the nod up from the drummer just for the fact that they also have to entertain the crowd the whole time. Drummer gets the "easiest" nod, simply because they can also practice in the car, at work, at school, wherever they can listen to the music. Guitar players, and bass players cannot.


Drummers do have the most physically demanding job in the band though.

 

Are you my bass player? Shit, that's a lot of the same things he said to me....funny.

 

As a drummer, I disagree with part of your statement...only because I can not practice anywhere there's music. I can memorize the song to know the changes and tempo, but I can not practice it - especially concerning the fills...it simply isn't the same as playing air drums.

 

 

For example, we've decided we want to do Danzig's "Mother" - I know that song inside and out in my head...but when it comes to the bridge - "Not about to see your light" - the drum fill right there - how exactly does that go again? (I've not yet listened to it today...) - but, there's the whole timing of it that has to be figured out, because of the positions of the objects with my band-kit - I have to figure on the motions needed between objects, being able to deliver a consistent tempo/feel/power level for each object - and play that fill as close as possible to the original song - simply because it's a hook for that moment in the song. I can't do that in my office, I can't do that in my truck, and I can't do that just listening to it. The motions have to be learned in order for it to be smooth, consistent, and delivered accurately.

 

Of course, now I've listened to it, and it's simple as shit, but, there's still the whole thing of where I can not walk in "knowing" it having never practiced it and having only listened to it. There are several fills in that song that are a bit more involved than the one I gave an example of as well...the ending actually is going to play hell with me...and that's a very simple song for guitar, bass and vocals.

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The hardest job in a band is the management/booker, end argument.

 

Guitar/Bass/Drums/ and even vocals are all based on what you put into it. Bass probably slightly below because as long as you're playing in tune, you can typically fake it alright. Just don't miss beats.

 

Guitar, well if you mess up it's pretty obvious. But you make it hard, it will be hard. You write easy riffs, stand around, it will be easy. Drums - you miss a cymbal, you really throw things off. You write hard parts, it will be physically demanding. Vocals - it goes without saying, it's all how far you want to push your voice.

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I actually had this conversation with my drummer at the time. He thought that drums were easier than guitar or bass(he actually also played both) because drummers can play most rock music with a couple of different beats(or one with AC/DC) but guitarist cant really play many songs 2 or 3 chords.

 

There are many guitarist that think that being the lone guitarist in the band is basically impossible, but i havent had any problems.

 

So i think its all to do with where you're coming from and what your speciality is.

 

But the hardest job in the band? Cat herder aka the guy who organizes everything.

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Sounds good on paper, but the reality is that there are so few "good" singers out there, that they're the hardest component to replace with competence. Like I said, drummers are incredibly important to the band, but there are more decent drummers and guitarists out there by far than there are good singers & bass players, at least that's been my experience, anyway.

 

Well that was coming from a singer haha. I would agree with the rest of that...more people wanna play drums and guitar..its the most fun. Therefore, the odds of finding someone decent at each instrument is probable. But if you DO have a good singer, they have the easiest roll.

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i think drums are underrated in terms of importance but not because they're the most 'physically demanding'! come on people, unless you're playing blast beats at 200bpm, are over 80 or have a medical condition there's no reason why you couldn't keep it together on the drums for at least an hour. whenever i'm on the kit (and i don't consider myself a drummer), i'm usually the LAST person to need a break!

 

imo, drums are important because they set the tempo and volume level, and they demand the most concentration because if the drums mess up, the band is lost!

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I think it would be hardest for a guitar player with covers, simply because that would have to be spot on for most people to recognize it. I think a drummer a lot of the time could play a solid quarter note beat the entire set, and change the tempo to match each song, and only musicians would notice. Its much easier to fake your way through drums than guitar. If you were anal about everything, and were learning everything exactly how it is originally played, then it just depends on what song you are doing, because it could be any person in the band that has the hardest part of a particular song.

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I can not practice anywhere there's music. I can memorize the song to know the changes and tempo, but I can not practice it - especially concerning the fills...it simply isn't the same as playing air drums.



BS. I've played drums. Me and my drummer have actually switched off on a song or two during gigs for fun. I can get an idea close enough, just listening and banging on a desk, to be able to sit down and figure it out in about 4 seconds.


the drum fill right there - how exactly does that go again?


You have 5, maybe 6 options to hit during a fill, as opposed to hundreds on a guitar. If you can't at least get an idea listening to it...you may have bigger issues.


 

No disrespect meant, sorry if I come off like a jackass, but my drummer half the time, has never even heard the song we're learning until he gets to practice and I play it for him. Then he picks up his sticks and plays it pretty much identically. If you have a good ear for drums, you don't need to sit down and repetitively play a song/fill/part over and over and over again like you do a guitar solo. (Barring some insanely difficult drum part, but how many of those are there in a cover band?)

 

My drummer would laugh at the suggestion that learning a cover on drums is as hard, or harder than learning one on guitar. Sure, if you play Green Day covers maybe.

 

Bottom line, learn how to play the song ONE time on drums, and you can "practice" it in your car, at your desk...etc. It's what my drummer does, and has always done. You can NOT do that on guitar/bass/violin/sax/piano...etc.,

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i think drums are underrated in terms of importance but not because they're the most 'physically demanding'! come on people, unless you're playing blast beats at 200bpm, are over 80 or have a medical condition there's no reason why you couldn't keep it together on the drums for at least an hour. whenever i'm on the kit (and i don't consider myself a drummer), i'm usually the LAST person to need a break!

 

Depends entirely on how you play.

 

Face it, everyone on stage is moving LESS than the drummer, unless you've got a singer that moves around a lot...or your whole band is doing the 80's music video thing all the time - then I would say that's physically more demanding...

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No disrespect meant, sorry if I come off like a jackass, but my drummer half the time, has never even heard the song we're learning until he gets to practice and I play it for him. Then he picks up his sticks and plays it pretty much identically. If you have a good ear for drums, you don't need to sit down and repetitively play a song/fill/part over and over and over again like you do a guitar solo. (Barring some insanely difficult drum part, but how many of those are there in a cover band?)


My drummer would laugh at the suggestion that learning a cover on drums is as hard, or harder than learning one on guitar. Sure, if you play Green Day covers maybe.


Bottom line, learn how to play the song ONE time on drums, and you can "practice" it in your car, at your desk...etc. It's what my drummer does, and has always done. You can NOT do that on guitar/bass/violin/sax/piano...etc.,

 

 

Show up to practice next time and have him do that with Stone Sour's "Say You'll Haunt Me", then post about how he played it identically.

 

Tell me that the guitar part is harder than the drums. Hell, the bass part is harder than the guitar part.

 

And yes it's a song we're playing, and playing well.

 

 

I posted Mother as an example only because I remembered I was to study that song and I'd been putting it off...it was the first thing that hit me...and yet, even though it's a weak example, it's still an example. MY POINT being that I can know the fill inside and out in my head, but until I physically go through it, it's a toss up on if I'll play it right from the get-go. I also have two kits, and while I have them set up similarly, there are significant differences in the feel of each kit to where it throws me a bit off switching between them for those times when I do practice at home. I'm quicker on my home kit than I am with my band kit, for example. The Cymbal sizes/weights are different...think of going from 11's on a strat with a floyd and locking nut, to 9's on a les paul. Sure you can hit the notes, but you just feel "off" when you play the same things and have to adjust your playing to compensate. I hate compensating, and as a drummer that can result in something throwing me a bit off.

 

Sure, any bloke can sit behind a kit and put down a stupid-simple drum beat. It takes a lot more do to anything more than that.

 

Another song we're doing is Snortin' Wiskey, Drinking Cocaine - I'm having trouble doing the transition from the solo bit to the double-bass after it...that's something I have to practice...and can't do "air drums" - simply because of the physics involved. I have to have that bass drum (on that kit, with those pedals) to get used to it, as well as everything else.

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