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An acoustic guitar with a strat like neck


danuniversal
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Come on Guys - cut him some slack...

 

I think the query is "acoutic guitars with electric-like necks?"

 

Answers commonly given:

Electric players tend to like Taylors...

Electric players tend to like Godin hybrids...

A&L AMI rather than Seagull...

You might like Ibanez...

Don't dismiss Yamaha...

etc.

 

It may be worth establishing what is meant by a "8"-body. It looks more Jumbo than Dread.

 

Let's start again, hey...

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the bdy style most lke an 8 is a jumbo. I think the neck you are looking for would be a Taylor. If the Taylor is out of you budget, look at Crafters.

 

Fender makes acoustic with strat type necks, but Fender is not really highly regarded for their acoustic instruments. You can also have a neck profiled by a luthier to match the neck you like for a fee.

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the bdy style most lke an 8 is a jumbo. I think the neck you are looking for would be a Taylor. If the Taylor is out of you budget, look at Crafters.


Fender makes acoustic with strat type necks, but Fender is not really highly regarded for their acoustic instruments. You can also have a neck profiled by a luthier to match the neck you like for a fee.

 

Great now we're back on track!!

 

Good advice, as always from Totamus, but more recently people have been reassessing Fender's offerings. I think they may have changed their supplier or specifications for their Chinese-subcontracted acoustics.

 

The definitive advice is, as always, look where you can, but try it out: if it sings to you (ears and fingers in this case) then that's the one!

 

Good luck!

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really, I would stay away from Fender acoustics. Note in my sig that I have one - and it is indeed a fine guitar. But there seems to be no consistency in Fenders, they move production all over the globe at a whim and the same model purchased a month apart could come from a completely different factory and be made from different materials.

 

Because of their rep, they also do not hold value. I never recommend Fender acoustics.

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really, I would stay away from Fender acoustics. Note in my sig that I have one - and it is indeed a fine guitar. But there seems to be no consistency in Fenders, they move production all over the globe at a whim and the same model purchased a month apart could come from a completely different factory and be made from different materials.


Because of their rep, they also do not hold value. I never recommend Fender acoustics.

 

I agree whole heartedly but the OP specifically wants an acoustic with a Strat neck and Fender is the only one. From what I understand the neck dimensions are, essentially, the same but don't know that for a fact.

 

And, as mentioned above, it seems Fender is starting to get the idea and some of their new offerings have garnered good reviews, not the California or the Malibu though.....

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Fender American Standard Strat necks are .78" to .80" thick at the first fret and have a nut width of 1 11/16" (1.6875). They have a soft C shape that stays proportionately thin all the way up the neck.

 

Fender Mexi Standard Strats are typically .83" to .86" at the first fret and usually have a nut width of 1.65", a little narrower than the acoustic standard of 1 11/16" (again, 1.6875"). The Mexi necks increase a little more in proportionate thickness as you move up the neck than the American Standard does.

 

The necks on other Fender models like the '50's, '60's and '70's reissues, artist models, etc. are all over the place, so I'm assuming you're looking for something that compares to either an American Standard or Mexi Standard model.

 

The closest thing to the feel of an American Standard Strat is probably going to be something from Blueridge or certain Aria models, which are about .76" at the first fret and have a similar C shape to a Fender. Most lower-end Alvarez models are in this range too.

 

Taylor necks, which are thinner than many, are still around .825" at the first fret, and for the past several years have had 1.75" nut widths on most models. If you're used to playing a Mexi Standard, you'll find the Taylor thickness comfortable, but the wider nut width may throw you off.

 

Guitars from Martin, Seagull, Epi Masterbilt, Larrivee, and Gibson - while by no means equally thick or equally shaped - aren't going to feel anything like a Fender American Standard or Mexi Standard Strat.

 

Still, most electric players have little problem transitioning to the thicker necks found on most acoustics. The heavier string tension on an acoustic actually argues for a thicker neck for many people, since the combination of a thin neck and heavy string tension is often a prescription for hand and wrist fatigue. If I were you I'd forget the Strat thing and just go play a bunch of guitars. You could buy an acoustic with a Fender-like neck - say a Blueridge - and find yourself hating it after a couple of months.

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As said, Blueridge, Fender new ones,(stay away from the acoustic Strat things, very bad) my Alvarez RD20S has a neck like the 1 and 200 Taylor series, love it, Blueridges are nice, but never could connect with one, still lovin' my Black RD20S.

Played a brand new Alvarez RD8 in a local store today and must say, they are made and sound better than ever, lammies!!,1999 with h/s case.

J

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I can give you a model that fits the bill neck-wise, but it's not too traditional. The Tacoma "Roadking" series has a really slim neck as far as thickness goes yet maintains the width of a traditional dred. All solid, American made and can be had for a song. I've seen them go for $400!

 

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  • 12 years later...
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I have played guitar for a living for 50 years and I have pimarily played Strats on electric gigs. For the last 15 years I have been doing more acoustic. I have the same question asked above. The Taylor 100 and 200 series are pretty good but are much flatter than strats. Strats average 9.5" neck radius. I have found that the Ovation has a 10" radius and has the same nut width as Strats. The scale is 1/2" shorter though. The trouble with Ovations is they are so inconsistent in build quality. The offshore Ovations epoxy the necks on and can not be reset. I have owned a lot of Ovations and I recommend American made ones only. Several of my favorite jazz guys used Ovation like Larry Coryell, Al DiMeola, and John McLaughlin. When set up properly they are fast and smooth from nut to the end of the fretboard. In my opinion Martins and Gibson and Takamine will never be as easy to play and won't satisfy a Strat man. They do sound great but that doesn't help much when you try to execute on it (especially up the neck).

 

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On 7/4/2020 at 11:23 PM, Larry Dean Hannah said:

I have played guitar for a living for 50 years and I have pimarily played Strats on electric gigs. For the last 15 years I have been doing more acoustic. I have the same question asked above. The Taylor 100 and 200 series are pretty good but are much flatter than strats. Strats average 9.5" neck radius. I have found that the Ovation has a 10" radius and has the same nut width as Strats. The scale is 1/2" shorter though. The trouble with Ovations is they are so inconsistent in build quality. The offshore Ovations epoxy the necks on and can not be reset. I have owned a lot of Ovations and I recommend American made ones only. Several of my favorite jazz guys used Ovation like Larry Coryell, Al DiMeola, and John McLaughlin. When set up properly they are fast and smooth from nut to the end of the fretboard. In my opinion Martins and Gibson and Takamine will never be as easy to play and won't satisfy a Strat man. They do sound great but that doesn't help much when you try to execute on it (especially up the neck).

 

 

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