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Biggest innovations in acoustic guitar in the last 10 years!


Crab_Cake
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The first thing that came to my mind was the Michael Kelly Acoustics with the adjustable neck also. I tried one recently in the store and it actually works very well, and the guitar sounds pretty nice too. Could be helpful for someone who plays a lot of slide guitar with a heavier slide, but still wants to be able to get back to a lower action for faster stuff.

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I'd have to agree with the changes in machining. CNC machining has helped make cheaper instruments sound and play much better than was ever possible.
According to physicists the X-brace is still the strongest and lightest way to reinforce a panel whether it be a barn-door or an aerospace component and I've never heard a lattice or Kasha based guitar that sounded as good as the best x-braced guitar.

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The first thing that came to my mind was the Michael Kelly Acoustics with the adjustable neck also. I tried one recently in the store and it actually works very well, and the guitar sounds pretty nice too. Could be helpful for someone who plays a lot of slide guitar with a heavier slide, but still wants to be able to get back to a lower action for faster stuff.



RGGGGG

Jeff Babicz invented that and used it on the superior Babicz brand guitars.

229344.jpg

Kind of my pet peeve, but Michael Kelly guitars licensed that from Babicz IIRC.

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I'd have to agree with the changes in machining. CNC machining has helped make cheaper instruments sound and play much better than was ever possible.

According to physicists the X-brace is still the strongest and lightest way to reinforce a panel whether it be a barn-door or an aerospace component and I've never heard a lattice or Kasha based guitar that sounded as good as the best x-braced guitar.



yah the triangle is the strongest shape in geometry/engineering IIRC.

So the X is a very strong shape.

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From what I have been told, Chip Todd while at Peavey adapted gun stock CNC machines to make guitar necks or bodies for his new T series electric guitars. Everyone else had to play catch up. I agree that the advancements have been mainly in the mfg of inexpensive good quality instruments.

Sometimes, people believe that the old ways of doing things are better than newer or more efficient methods. Sometimes this is true and sometimes its not. Reputations of legenday companies products, components or techniques live on, sometimes for a good reason and sometimes not.

I remember a story a preacher told about how is mother always cut the turkey in half to cook it. I think it was a turkey anyway... The reason she cut the turkey in half was because her mother had done it that way. Well, it turns out that the reason grandma cut the turkey in half was because the oven she had wasnt big enough to cook a whole one. There was some really interesting finish at the end of this yarn, but I never did pay all that much attention in church as a youngster. Ok, I still dont, but you get the idea.

Is an old tube amp and a 50 year old Strat better than brand new ones? You would think so based on the price they command. Maybe so, I cant say. People are skeptical of new stuff. Maybe because they got sold a bill of goods in the past. Remember those junky little foreign cars? It takes a while for stuff to catch on, be accepted after a rough start and get most of the bugs worked out.

Just my 2 cents.

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Jeff Babicz invented that and used it on the superior Babicz brand guitars.



I played a Babicz at NAMM one year. I was decidedly underwhelmed. It seemed like innovation for the sake of being different rather than any sort of usefulness.

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I played a Babicz at NAMM one year. I was decidedly underwhelmed. It seemed like innovation for the sake of being different rather than any sort of usefulness.



I have played a few duds, and a few great ones. There QC is a little off especially the earlier models.

I really like the guitars though.

Porcupine Tree uses them.

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I have played a few duds, and a few great ones. There QC is a little off especially the earlier models.



The one I played was certainly an early model.

OTOH, why the hell would anybody show anything less than their best at a trade show where orders are taken on the floor. :freak: At the same show I tried out the then new Strobostomp tuner. I don't know what was wrong with their setup, but it really demoed poorly. I even told the guy, "I know this thing is way better than it's demoing, but somebody in tradeshow/marketing really needs to get their s#!+ together."

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My vote for the biggest innovation in Acoustic Guitar making in the last 10 years is...the internet. It's allowed small town luthiers to market their products worldwide. It's allowed anyone who wants a great guitar to browse for one online and have it shipped to their home. It's allowed us to hear clips of thousands of different guitars to help us decide which has the better sound we're looking for. It's allowed us to get in arguments like this over guitars. Hell, it's even put the directions and materials available to anyone that wants to make their own guitar. To me, that's innovation to the greatest degree. Just my 2 cents worth..

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From what I have been told, Chip Todd while at Peavey adapted gun stock CNC machines to make guitar necks or bodies for his new T series electric guitars. Everyone else had to play catch up. I agree that the advancements have been mainly in the mfg of inexpensive good quality instruments.


Sometimes, people believe that the old ways of doing things are better than newer or more efficient methods. Sometimes this is true and sometimes its not. Reputations of legenday companies products, components or techniques live on, sometimes for a good reason and sometimes not.


I remember a story a preacher told about how is mother always cut the turkey in half to cook it. I think it was a turkey anyway... The reason she cut the turkey in half was because her mother had done it that way. Well, it turns out that the reason grandma cut the turkey in half was because the oven she had wasnt big enough to cook a whole one. There was some really interesting finish at the end of this yarn, but I never did pay all that much attention in church as a youngster. Ok, I still dont, but you get the idea.


Is an old tube amp and a 50 year old Strat better than brand new ones? You would think so based on the price they command. Maybe so, I cant say. People are skeptical of new stuff. Maybe because they got sold a bill of goods in the past. Remember those junky little foreign cars? It takes a while for stuff to catch on, be accepted after a rough start and get most of the bugs worked out.


Just my 2 cents.



I never did really understand why Peavey didn't take off more than it did. They are innovative and made in the USA (or at least used to be. not sure now). I have played several Peavey Guitars and always found them to be quite good - especially for the price point. I have always thought that their logo , that zig-zaggy thing, just looked cheap and crappy.

Could it be that the visual of the logo has held them back? They created a self contained manufacturing campus in Mississippi to manufacture and put reall thought and expertise into the instruments and amplifiers. They were innovating and providing a bigger bang for the buck while other companies were cost cutting and providing less.

Yet a Peavey guitar is regarded equally as well as an Estaeban or Zuger. I dont own a Peavey either, but had a great Peavey Bass and several Peavey amps that I was very happy with.

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I have a T-60 that I have owned since it was new in 1979. I love it and it is built like a tank. They seem to have quite a following and I can see why. My folks have a Peavey acoustic guitar and a Yamaha that I play when I go back to Iowa to see them. The Yamaha plays and sounds better and is the one I usually play when I go see them. The newer Peavey electric guitars dont do much for me. Maybe a custom shop model.. I dont see any of their acoustics anymore, I wonder if they still make any?

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