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The wackiest mic in your collection...


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Originally posted by Matt Hepworth



I have one of those too and it gets used regularly for kick and bass cabs. Tried it on voice a time or two as well...

 

 

I have one of these as well. It's a great mic for spoken voice-over work. I also occasionally use it on bass drum or bass guitar.

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Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe



I've got one of those too - it's called a Yamaha Subkick.
:)
I really like it a lot! That, along with an RE20, is my "go to" kick mic setup.
Phil-Thumbs-Up-Small.gif



We need to talk, Phil. I love my RE20 for many instruments and voice, but I have yet to get a really good sound from it as a kick mic. I know it's been popular on kick for many years, but all I get is a dull thud. :(

Other than the Sub-kick as a low end sweetener, do you have a specific technique for using the RE20 on kick?

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Originally posted by fantasticsound



We need to talk,
Phil
. I love my RE20 for many instruments and voice, but I have yet to get a really good sound from it as a kick mic. I know it's been popular on kick for many years, but all I get is a dull thud.
:(

Other than the Sub-kick as a low end sweetener, do you have a specific technique for using the RE20 on kick?



Not that you asked me... :)

When I use my RE-20 for kick, it's best pretty close up on the beater. That way you get the attack. It's relatively flat compared to the D-112. With a D-112, it's usually out at the hole on the front head, right?

When the RE-20 is inside pretty close to the beater like that, it gets a punch you in the chest kind of tone... not real subby, not real real hi-fi. Just thuoomp! Scoop a bit at 300-400 and rock.

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Originally posted by Lee Knight



Not that you asked me...
:)

When I use my RE-20 for kick, it's best pretty close up on the beater. That way you get the attack. It's relatively flat compared to the D-112. With a D-112, it's usually out at the hole on the front head, right?


When the RE-20 is inside pretty close to the beater like that, it gets a punch you in the chest kind of tone... not real subby, not real real hi-fi. Just thuoomp! Scoop a bit at 300-400 and rock.

So, is the mic actually inside the kick drum shell? Or is it sitting next to the kick pedal pointing at where the beater is going to hit the head? I'm using an Audio Technica PRO-25ax for my kick drum now, and it's pointing into the 6" hole on the resonant head.

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I tend to move my RE20 out a bit more than Lee does, but he's definitely correct about getting more attack when it's inside a bit further. I tend to put mine into the hole, so that about half of the mic's length - maybe a little bit more - around two thirds of it - is inside of the drum. IOW, the back 1/3rd of the mic is still outside of the hole in the front head. I like the balance there a lot of the time, although I will move it in closer or out a little if that sounds better. :)

I tend not to aim it directly at the beater either - I usually sweep it horizontally from the point where the beater strikes to the head / shell junction over on the floor tom side of the kit. Somewhere in that arc is a spot where it will seem to just "work", and the exact location varies from kick drum to kick drum. But it's usually not when it's pointed right at the beater, but somewhere between the beater and the shell. If you want more attack, you can move inward towards the batter head, as Lee mentioned, and if it's more "boom and bloom" you're after, move it back a bit further from the beater head.

I can suppliment that on the low range with the Subkick if I want / need it, which is mostly all about that 60 Hz area fundamental. I always print the two mics to seperate tracks, and usually neither gets any EQ when going down. Just mic / pre and maybe 2-3 dB of compression on the loudest peaks when tracking. On some occasions I'll use a HPF up in the 80 Hz area on the RE20 and let the Subkick handle the lowest range, and use the RE20 just for the mids and top (attack), but usually the RE20 doesn't get eviscerated like that. ;)

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Originally posted by C. Bradley

So, is the mic actually inside the kick drum shell? Or is it sitting next to the kick pedal pointing at where the beater is going to hit the head? I'm using an Audio Technica PRO-25ax for my kick drum now, and it's pointing into the 6" hole on the resonant head.

 

 

The Pro 25 maxes out at around 12 kHz, so the top isn't as extended as it is on an RE20, which goes out to about 18 kHz... they're not a very bright mic, so I doubt you're going to get as much attack from that mic with a more distant placement as you would with an RE20 in the same location. You may want to try moving it in a bit closer to the batter head if you feel you're not getting enough attack.

 

I've used a pair of Pro 25's a couple of times (not the AX models, but the originals) on non-hole equipped kick drums, with one on the beater side (near the kick pedal) and the other on the resonant head, with each going to a seperate track. Try both placements and see if either one works for you, and also try moving further inside the shell too. As long as you have a hole in the resonant head (or no front head on the drum), that's probably your best option with that mic.

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Thanks Lee and Phil for your input.

I've always used the RE20 in similar fashion to Phil. I guess it's relatively flat character doesn't do it for me, alone. I can see the sub-kick working well with it, though.

Bear in mind I'm used to the modern, built-for-kick kinds of mics, normally in a live setting. My favorites being the Shure Beta52, Audix D6, though I can work with the equivalent Sennheiser, AT, AKG D112 and other brand mics. The only mics I own to cover kick are the RE20 and my Audix D4. (Which was their kick and low tom mic before the D6 was available.) I like the D4, but it's a little on the light side in the deep bass for kick. Perfect for floor toms, though.

I'd love to know how all the records using RE20 were recorded prior to the advent of the Sub Kick.

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Originally posted by fantasticsound

Thanks
Lee
and
Phil
for your input.



I'd love to know how all the records using RE20 were recorded prior to the advent of the Sub Kick.

 

 

Room mics! The reason I get in close (6-8") is because I've got something outside of the drum too...

 

Having said all that, I tracked a whole album with the D112 and it's great. But for me, I've got to dip it 2dB or so at 4k.

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Originally posted by Lee Knight

Inspired by this thread I just won a vintage EV 915 (crystal mic). I've been looking for something with crap tone for the odd lo-fi passage. I think this will do it...



http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7340849180&rd=1&sspagename=STRK%3AMEWN%3AIT&rd=1

 

 

I finaly had a chance to use this antique Crystal mic I bought off ebay.

 

The song is called Cambodia. The verses are 1st person where a grunt is describing how he's hiding under some bush while the enemy walks by... except he's really not in Cambodia and is having a flashback.

 

The crystal mic is used for the verses only as a radio transmission from his nightmare.

 

Pretty frickin' cool!

 

When the Chorus comes in with full fidelity multitracked voices sing CAMBODIA!, the contrast is striking.

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The RFT 7151 is a huge, weird one.

The Placid audio copperphone (as meriphew mentioned) I have three. One has my name on it!

The DaviSound 1950. Looks like a birdhouse...

Grundig GBM125 looks like a mini 421... Sounds great.

The "echolette TOP 12" D12. Gold!

The "echolette" 409. Awesome. I love the echolette branded OEM's a lot.

The "egg static" 20 dollar tea strainer mic intended for harmonica, totally great lo-fi bullet type of sound.

A bunch of others....

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The wackiest mic in my collection is also one of my best - a soundfield microphone system.

The system was developed through a collaboration between the Brittish government and audio genius Michael Gerzon. What they produced was a single mic with four capsules (four mini-mics) stuffed into it in a sort of cube formation within a hefty condensor-looking microphone.

The capsules are always simultaneously "on," and always recording in 360 degrees. Signals from each of the capsules are output from the mic via a proprietary 4-signal cable that connects the mic with its (remote) control box that makes sense of the information. Inside the box, the signals are assembled into either a stereo pair or a surround mix, depending on which control box you have and how you're using it.

The control box receives the raw signals from the mic, and is able to mold them into anything you like. With powerful algorithms at its core, you can dial up any pattern, from cardioid to omni, and any stereo spread, from mono to a truly 3-dimensional deep stereo field. The patterns, I believe, are among the most accurate of any mic, and the stereo spread, with the phase-alligned capsules and Gerzon's wonderful algorithms, is remarkable. You can also manipulate the mic signals via the remote controls - while the mic remains physically in one place, you can move its virtual front around, tell it to go upside down, generate mid/side signals, etc.

All this may seem complicated, but it's exceptionally easy to use. Basically, you set it up, and twirl the dials on pattern and stereo spread (as you're listening to the source) to come up with an ideal setting. Rather than physically moving the mic around, you simply make adjustments on the control unit as you're listening to its realtime effect on whatever it is you're recording.

I would characterize the actual sound as crystalline rather than warm. It's accurate, clear, and precise. I've had wonderful results from piano to voice. If I want to warm it up, I may put its output (the control unit contains its own preamps so it outputs a line-level balanced signal) directly into a juicy tube compressor - if that's what I'm going for.

While not cheap, because it's so damn versatile, it's really worth it. It's wacky for sure, but given its value, I think if more people understood what the thing was, more people would own it.

It even has a heater next to the capsules in order to maintain an optiminum temperature!

-Peace, Love, and Brittanylips

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