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Manual Phasor like Thumb on tape


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Since you "know it's not panning", I presume you know how it was done, so why don't you tell us? What was it like in the old days grand dad?

I'm guessing the dry and the flanged tracks were panned for stereo effect. Whenever you have a delayed copy of a signal panned to another place, your brain interprets this as directional information.

It's a bit like the old Alesis SR-16 drum machine. It used mono samples of reverb to make 'stereo' drum sounds. The problem was they just copied and delayed one side to make it stereo, so when you had a big ballad snare, the reverb tail veered off to the left.

Wake up Walters - there has been a lot more good music made since Itchy Coo Park ...

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Well they just don't. If it's the mono guitar pedals you are talking about, they are just mono.

Maybe if you are getting on a bit, and your ears are failing on certain frequencies, possible you might hear this as left/right information. Or maybe you are listening in a dodgy acoustic environment, and different frequencies might reflect back at you from different parts of the room.

If you are talking about stereo effects, then obviously there is some panning going on, and any movement is due to the phycoacoustic effect I mentioned earlier.

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With Tape phasing and flangering its Stereo mostly
maybe its Bleeding over Channel Bleeding with it Hits the PEAK
some how it Crosses over from the PEAK

All i can think of is if you had different EQ's on Left and Right channels so when it hits the PEAK it changes to the other speaker and slopes down

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Mr. Walters - can you site a reference song that is commercially available so I can hear what you're thinking (hehe, did I just say that?)...anyway like on Axis Bold As Love or something? What are you talking about in the physical world so I can hear it?

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In nature, sound can arrive at our ears directly from the source (like if you were speaking to me). Multiple reflections (or 'copies') of the same sound also arrive the long way - bouncing off things - before reaching our two ears.

Our brains are designed to interpret this information coming from both ears. The sounds that reach our ears first allow us to know the direction of the sound. If a sound reaches our left ear first, we percieve the sound to come from the left. The echoes arriving afterwards give us clues to the space that the sound is in (e.g. small room, or mountains etc).

When we are playing around with tape flange, this is an artificial effect that fools our brain. This is called psycho-acoustics - something that should be of great interest to psycho's.

So - imagine two copies of the signal, panned left and right.

If they are perfectly in-sync, they will appear as centred mono.
If the right side is delayed a little (flanged), the sound on the left will reach our ear first - and we perceive this as coming from the left.
If the right side is allowed to preceed the left, we will percieve the sound as coming from the right.

So obviously if you are fooling around with through-zero flanging, with stereo-panned tracks, the sound is going to pan from left, to centre, to right.

If the delays are kept under 30 ms, the Haas effect means we don't percieve the delay as a discrete echo. This is how Haas panning works - which can be more effective than pot-panning.

So how is this obsession working out for you Walters?

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Thanks Kiwi for the information

with through-zero flanging, with stereo-panned tracks, the sound is going to pan from left, to centre, to right.

Why or how does Through Zero Flanging do this? with stereo panned tracks



If the delays are kept under 30 ms, the Haas effect means we don't percieve the delay as a discrete echo. This is how Haas panning works - which can be more effective than pot-panning.


How does a Flanger create Haas delay effects?
Only Stereo Flangering can create Haas effects?

When i put my thumb on a stereo panned track the Left side gets flanged but the Right channel gets Haas effect? how i don't get how it does that


How does using Haas delay effect insteand of using Pot panning?
so Delaying 0ms-25ms on one side of the channels will create Pot Panning Positions?

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Try slapping yourself on the right side of your head really hard. If you haven't had too much pot, you should hear a dull thud - followed by some distant echos. If you listen really hard, the echos will talk to you. 'Walterssss ... do that again, but harder next time'. Rinse, spit, repeat ... forever.

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Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe

Walters is either a guy with a little knowledge and a lot of imagination (and less than optimal communication skills ),
a pro who is artfully yanking all of our chains,
or maybe just an old fashoned troll - depending on your POV.
:)



^

Terry D.

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Well, if you tire of Walter's posts, you can always ignore him folks. Nothing says you have to respond to anything he posts... and if you want to, of course, you can. But please remain civil - that's all I ask. :)

If Walters crosses the line and starts flooding the board, or otherwise becomes disruptive, I'll address the issue... but at this time, IMO, he's relatively harmless - whoever and whatever he is. ;):D

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