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through-zero doppler


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Originally posted by Kiwiburger

I'd recommend a UFO drive. Your basic Intertial Hyperspace Warp Interstellar Overdrive should do the trick. Be careful when modulating the space time continum with square waves though.

 

Are you SURE you wanna recommend something like that? Not to be a downer or anything, but THAT kind of advice could land someone on the other side of Uranus ;)

 

Be careful about that, Bud

 

 

:freak:

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Originally posted by Zooey

The trick is to get the rotor spinning at the speed of light so that the soundwaves travel backwards through time and cross through themselves.

Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe

Now THAT'S a creative answer!
:thu:
It's wrong, but it's still good somehow.
;)

You know, it might work! As the rotors approach the speed of light, special relativity tells us that its movement through time (with respect to ours) will slow down. This effect is not just theoretical; it's been measured.

 

It would be similar to observing a sound source fall into a black hole, with the observer watching and listening from a position safely beyond the event horizon. Assuming the sound source could withstand being spaghetti-fied by the gravitational waves (5th generation iPod?), as its speed accelerated to the speed of light, its movement through space-time would become infinately slow with respect to the observer. It would be the ultimate ptich shifter.

 

-Peace, Love and Brittanylips

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Actually - the execution of the Walters character could learn a lot about "release of tension" from Britt et al

 

It's the walters act that's snoozeville

 

you were really starting to work on it there for a little bit

 

eh, I figure trying new things..yeah they are going to fatigue the performer and I expect a couple of backwards steps, but KEEP trying!!!

 

we'll get the walters act cleared up!

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Originally posted by Brittanylips



You know, it might work! As the rotors approach the speed of light, special relativity tells us that its movement through time (with respect to ours) will slow down. This effect is not just theoretical; it's been measured.


It would be similar to observing a sound source fall into a black hole, with the observer watching and listening from a position safely beyond the event horizon. Assuming the sound source could withstand being spaghetti-fied by the gravitational waves (5th generation iPod?), as its speed accelerated to the speed of light, its movement through space-time would become infinately slow with respect to the observer. It would be the ultimate ptich shifter.


-Peace, Love and Brittanylips

 

The problem with that is that once something crosses the event horizon, it's completely invisible / inaudible to someone observing from the outside. :) Poof! Goodbye Leslie - never to be seen or heard again. ;) Also, the engineering problems of building a Leslie (or anything else man-made for that matter) that could withstand that journey are currently insurmountable. :D

 

But time dilation is a real phenomenon, and if you can get that Leslie rotor spinning fast enough, say .5 C, then there would be an observable / measureable time dilation effect. But you still have to deal with the acceleration / deceleration issues. You'd need one heck of a motor, and a serious brake on that Leslie. ;):D

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Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe



The problem with that is that once something crosses the event horizon, it's completely invisible / inaudible to someone observing from the outside.
:)
Poof! Goodbye Leslie - never to be seen or heard again.
;)

Interestingly enough, I believe current thinking suggests the opposite: from the position of the observer outside of the event horizon, it would appear that the Leslie would never actually fall into the black hole. To the observer outside of the black hole, the speaker would appear to rest on the precipice forever, its time becoming infinately slow with respect to "normal" space/time. Thus, no observable "poof."

 

However, the Leslie itself would have the opposite experience, accelerating (to the speed of light) into the hole.

Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe

Also, the engineering problems of building a Leslie (or anything else man-made for that matter) that could withstand that journey are currently insurmountable.
:D

You know, those Leslies are really pretty bullet proof. I wouldn't be so quick to write it off. Not so sure about the recent crop of Leslie emulation plug-ins. ;)

Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe

But time dilation is a real phenomenon, and if you can get that Leslie rotor spinning fast enough, say .5 C, then there would be an observable / measureable time dilation effect. But you still have to deal with the acceleration / deceleration issues. You'd need one heck of a motor, and a serious brake on that Leslie.
;):D

I believe it's been measured using speeds as slow as airplane speed. So, hang the thing under a 747, play 'Fly Like An Eagle' through it ("time keeps on slippin slippin slippin..."), open up a Mountain Dew, and push record on a Sony PCM-D1 from high on the mountain top. :)

 

-Peace, Love, and Brittttttttttttttttttttttttttttttt..... [falling into black hole]

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Originally posted by Brittanylips


Interestingly enough, I believe current thinking suggests the opposite: from the position of the observer outside of the event horizon, it would appear that the Leslie would never actually fall into the black hole. To the observer outside of the black hole, the speaker would appear to rest on the precipice forever, its time becoming infinately slow with respect to "normal" space/time. Thus, no observable "poof."

 

That's how I understand it, though my understanding is extremely tenuous and the the parts that are hanging on are hanging on to misconceptions! :D

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Interestingly enough, I believe current thinking suggests the opposite: from the position of the observer outside of the event horizon, it would appear that the Leslie would never actually fall into the black hole. To the observer outside of the black hole, the speaker would appear to rest on the precipice forever, its time becoming infinately slow with respect to "normal" space/time. Thus, no observable "poof."

 

I've heard arguments for both... but essentially it's unimportant in terms of this discussion, because at anywhere near that velocity, it would appear to be "at rest" to an earthbound observer, as you indicated, which means no doppler shift. ;)

 

However, the Leslie itself would have the opposite experience, accelerating (to the speed of light) into the hole.

 

I agree, and I don't think I've ever seen anything that would dispute that.

 

We'll have to see if we can get Toxic Potatoe involved in this discussion - he's a genuinne MIT / CalTech trained physicist and physics professor. And he does calculus in his head. :eek::mad:;) IOW, he's a LOT smarter than I am, especially in regards to this subject. :o

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Originally posted by Blips

Interestingly enough, I believe current thinking suggests the opposite: from the position of the observer outside of the event horizon, it would appear that the Leslie would never actually fall into the black hole. To the observer outside of the black hole, the speaker would appear to rest on the precipice forever, its time becoming infinately slow with respect to "normal" space/time. Thus, no observable "poof."

Originally posted by Phil

I've heard arguments for both... but essentially it's unimportant in terms of this discussion, because at anywhere near that velocity, it would appear to be "at rest" to an earthbound observer, as you indicated, which means no doppler shift.
;)

Good point! Although, we are suspending an awful lot of disbelief. For example: no atmosphere/no sound/ no doppler.

 

Plus, union rules specifically limit members moving any musical instrument (including music stands) closer than 1 AU to a black hole. ;)

 

-Peace, Love, and Brittanylips

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Once again, Walters-related threads make up over 50% of all posts on the first page of this forum. Can we just rename it the "Walters Forum" and get it over with?

 

I'm heading one level down to the forum where recording audio is still occasionally discussed.

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Originally posted by Zooey

Once again, Walters-related threads make up over 50% of all posts on the first page of this forum. Can we just rename it the "Walters Forum" and get it over with?


No, the forum name isn't going to be changing any time soon.
:)
But I understand your point about Walters, and have asked him not to "flood" the board with his topics. However, since you mentioned it, I thought I should check, and actually, there are currently only two "Walters" threads on page one. Which IMO, is not excessive.
:)

I'm heading one level down to the forum where recording audio is still occasionally discussed.


Recording is still discussed in here too.
;)
But by all means, feel free to pop into Mark's forum - I do so from time to time myself.
:thu:


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