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Originally posted by Edward



I think it'd look really cool til it got scratched, then maybe not so much so....

 

Acrylic ("Lucite") is fairly scratchable, and it is susceptible to burns and solvent damage, as in cig ash or alcohol.

 

Someone tosses their Jack-on-ice at your Lucy, and suddenly she is permanently hazy :( . Lucite also yellows with exposure to the elements (not a pretty lemondrop yellow, but a dirty-teeth yellow).

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Originally posted by The Dark Horse



Trying to figure out if the crack in the body is repairable - f#ckin' UPS!


 

I have a DR500A (Dillion's PRS style acrylic) - the original neck's acrylic headstock broke in transit, Dillion replaced it with a regular wood bolt-on neck and declared the guitar a "#1 of 1" lol... Nice guitar, looks great but weighs a ton.

 

Good luck with your V. I'd contact Dillion directly & see if you can exchange the body for a good one.

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There's a company here in Finland called Flaxwood that makes guitars out of wood fiber composite. Okay, it's still technically wood but there's not a single piece of solid wood on the guitars.

 

I've tried a few and they are fantastic guitars. They are also totally consistant so no weeding through good ones and less-than-stellar ones. Tonally they sound something like a cross between a Les Paul and a ES-335 to my ears. They sustain really well too and are very comfortable to play too.

 

The real problem with them is that IMO they are bit too expensive. At nearly 2000

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Originally posted by LaXu

There's a company here in Finland called Flaxwood that makes guitars out of wood fiber composite. Okay, it's still technically wood but there's not a single piece of solid wood on the guitars.

 

I've tried a few and they are fantastic guitars. They are also totally consistant so no weeding through good ones and less-than-stellar ones. Tonally they sound something like a cross between a Les Paul and a ES-335 to my ears. They sustain really well too and are very comfortable to play too.

 

The real problem with them is that IMO they are bit too expensive. At nearly 2000

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Originally posted by jrkirkish

I've thought about sending off a 3D model of a strat body off to a rapid prototype place. Some of these places will give you a whole lot of options; PVC, even aluminium. I'd love to try that.


Does anyone have a 3D / CAD drawing of any bolt-on guitar body.


I'd love to have an all-aluminum guitar. Get a body fabricated, bolt on one of those metal necks from the 80's, make a pickguard out of diamond plate. For bonus points, get it chromed. For total awesomeness, get everything gold plated.

http://www.electricalguitarcompany.com/

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i wonder how you shield an aluminum guitar? with wood?:p

 

i bet that thing screeches like a mofo. but i'll take it! i'm seriously gassin for a solid metal guitar now, thanks asshole;)

 

why did it have to be that, why not a $100

squire:cry:

 

 

time to the scrap yard

 

 

 

seriously

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Originally posted by guitarman63mm

i wonder how you shield an aluminum guitar? with wood?
:p

i bet that thing screeches like a mofo. but i'll take it! i'm seriously gassin for a solid metal guitar now, thanks asshole;)


why did it have to be that, why not a $100

squire:cry:



time to the scrap yard




seriously

Those Electrical models are EXPENSIVE.

like 3k.

 

If the bartone is 30" scale, I'll get one in 3 years.

 

I've been planning on making a thinline-type guitar out of old blackboards we have in the garage...

I should do that.

 

Probably a squire neck, or a Mihgty Mite graphite.

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Originally posted by SteinbergerHack

Steinbergers (the original real ones, not the Spirits) are entirely made of a phenolic-based composite.


I really like the one I have.....

 

The Steinberger L series (L, XL, GL) were made with a mix of graphite and fiberglass fibers set in a polyester resin matrix. Some early instruments used Kevlar, but it was too difficult to work with. The other 'original' Steinbergers had wood bodies with necks made by the same process.

 

Phenolic was used on the fretboards. Some of the early Spirit instruments also had phenolic fretboards.

 

I really like both of mine, also.

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