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Floating bridge and downtuning


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Everything has to be reset. There will be less tension from the strings, so tension has to be reduced at the springs also. This may make the trem float lightly differently, so intonation may have to be reset.

 

It isn;t something you'll ever be able to do on the fly at a gig or anything.

 

-Y.

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Wyatt is right. There aren't any particular setup tips and no matter how much the trem moves, the intonation will be off, and all the notes could potentially sound crappy.

 

 

But consider blocking the trem. Search for blocking the trem on here and you'll find some info. Basically you put a small piece of wood in the back cavity. A very large dowel could work and you could whittle it to the right size with a wood rasp. If you block the trem, then you can detune all you want but you can't use the trem.

 

Consider leaving the trem cavity plate off, and then when you want to block the trem just shove the piece of wood in there (put it in tight you don't want it to fall out, possibly pull the trem up and then shove it in, it's got to be big enough to fit in there tight) then you can detune, and then when you are done you can retune to normal tuning (do this first) and then pull it out.

 

Just some ideas.

Good Luck.

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Thanks guys.

 

Basically I have all my guitars setup tuned down a semitone in standard tuning. I was wondering how much lower it can go. Lower than a tone? (DGCFAD)? I'd like to hear some opinions before I try it.

 

Everyone who's doing serious downtuning they're using fixed bridge guitars, but the tremolo bar is part of my playing.

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Originally posted by tnttnttnt

Thanks guys.


Basically I have all my guitars setup tuned down a semitone in standard tuning. I was wondering how much lower it can go. Lower than a tone? (DGCFAB)? I'd like to hear some opinions before I try it.


Everyone who's doing serious downtuning they're using fixed bridge guitars, but the tremolo bar is part of my playing.

 

Yeah, I knod of reread the question when I reopened the post.

 

I really don't know. If you keep moving up in string gauges (12's or 13's), and start removing springs from the Floyd, you could try and push dropped C, but I think it will take a lot of tweaking to get it right, and you'll have extremely loose tension on the Floyd. My guess is you'll lose too much stability in the Floyd to make it practical.

 

You'll only know if you try, but it means a lot of trail and error to get there, and a lot to get back if it doesn't work. Getting Trems to float right is a frustrating balancing act. Now, if the trem is set up to only drop the pitch down, it may be easier.

 

-Y.

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Originally posted by tnttnttnt

How low can you downtune a guitar with a Floyd Rose type of bridge without having problems?


Any setup tips?

 

Three things:

 

1) Reduce the spring tension (fewer springs, loosen the 'claw' screws, or change the holes, whatever works)

 

2) Raise the action - the lower you go, the higher you'll need it to be.

 

3) Use thicker strings to keep the tension as high as possible.

 

Remember that when it's all set up and in tune, you want the bridge plate to be absolutely parallel to the face of the guitar.

 

You can block it, but if you still try to use it you're likely to have tuning problems.

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