Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
D Charles

Mid Field Monitors; Placement and mounting considerations?

Recommended Posts

Hi guys. I've got NS-10M's and Auratones in my face, but I've re-worked my great big 3-ways and they sound great really loud and away from me. In tests I've put them around 10' apart and sat about 10' back and they just really shake the room and sound profound. I'd really like to know about mounting and placement options.

 

First, I'm just an older hobbyist; spent most of my life singing and playing guitar in front of people for a living and always recorded demos and originals. I only record me and mine so commercial studio considerations aren't required. I'm planning on redoing my recording room and building a custom desk as soon as I can design something that will hold my gear properly and look presentable.

 

But at any rate, I'll have my near fields on shelves built into my desk (or on the 8' folding table I'm using now) tweets at ear level, which means, to get the big monitors aimed at my ears they'll need to be higher and angled down a bit. So some questions:

 

1 Are there any plans out there for soffet mounting? I've seen some pics and rooms for that matter, but never the actual materials used (under the attractive outer treatment).

 

2 Is there a rule for distance apart and distance to the mix position? Should it be a perfect triangle like near fields?

 

3 I can't imagine just locating the speakers by math or something, what's a good way to be able to move the speakers up and down, right and left and adjust their downward pitch toward the mix position and somehow account for the actual framing you're gonna have to do to mount them to the wall? I've considered my ultimate speaker stands and maybe making double plywood bases on hinges with a front lip so I could move the stands around and put stuff under the back (hinge in front) to change the downward throw).

 

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be aware of boundary cancellation.

 

General info: http://www.peavey.com/support/technotes/soundsystems/boundarycancellation.cfm

 

Here's a chart: http://www.padrick.net/LiveSound/CancellationMode.htm

 

Use this excel sheet to calculate for you (it takes the listener's position into account: http://100db.com/misc/boundary.xls

 

 

Also be aware of "The Power Alley: http://www.prosoundweb.com/live/articles/jbrusi/pa.php

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'll need to place the listening position correctly, provide the correct room treatment, and place the speakers correctly relative to the listening position.

 

The listening position is very important, since there are always nulls and peaks at pretty standard places in a room. At 38% of the rooms depth (back from the wall behind the speakers) and slightly off center left to right, you'll naturally minimize problems.

 

Then you treat the room correctly to further reduce problems, which is easy enough but a little costly to do right, though if you build them yourself you can do pretty well. The biggest cost in that case will be the insulation.

 

The speaker locations then are driven by the listening position. They need to be in a triangle. So if they are 6 feet from you to each one, they need to be 6 feet apart. They should be toed in to point just behind your head.

 

There will always be some cancellations and peaks. It's inevitable unless you have a really nice, fairly large, purpose built room. The trick is to just minimize them. But the above steps should do that, though of course this is the crypto version of it. There's a lot of details to take in to do it right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a side note, my room is about 22' x 23' with vaulted ceiling (10' middle and 8' on the sides) and treated according to the F. Alton Everest book. I'm gonna have to tweak it though as I intend to build a non parallel wall and divide it about 60/40. The 60% will be my recording/mixing space and the 40% will be storage for all of my instruments, tapes, albums, CDs etc. (clutter). May include an isolation booth as well.

 

Thanks for the comments and links so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The smaller you could make the storage room, the better probably. The larger the space, the less of an issue bass frequency buildup is. You could always make the wall accoustically transparent, i.e. just a 1x8 frame, which you fill with 703 and put a thick cloth cover over on both sides. That would create a separate space, but leave the space open from a low frequency standpoint and provide a really good bass trap. There maybe some reason that would be a bad thing, that I'm not thinking of, but it could be a pretty interesting way to achieve both goals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dean,

 

According to my book, I made six 4' x 6' low bass absorbers, six 2' x 4' high bass absorbers, and six 2' x 2' low mid absorbers. These are tuned at 125 Hz, 250 Hz, and 500 Hz respectively. The specs on my drop ceiling take care of the hi mid, low and high treble absorbing. The absorbers are different thicknesses of wood with plywood fronts and certain size holes drilled at certain patterns and all have 703 rigid fiberglass in em. I built em quite a while back according to that Everest book. It made a huge difference that I could hear as I mounted the absorbers.

 

I built this room just for recording and since I wanted it soundproof I framed the room (24' x 24'), insulated and then built internal walls (double framed) which is why my space is around 22' x 23'. The walls are 5/8" drywall and about 60% or more covered with the absorbers, ceiling is drop ceiling tiles and floor is vinyl tile.

 

It's a pretty good sounding space, but what I didn't consider when I built it is the parallel walls where I get some flutter echos at certain places. This is why I'm considering building the non-parallel wall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What type of 3 ways are you using? Do you plan on wall mounting them, or soffit mounting? If you're thinking of soffit mounts, it's a TON of work getting them correctly placed, the mounts properly built, etc. etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Phil said: What type of 3 ways are you using?

 

Well, it's a long story... Back when I got my first job in the mid 70s (making twice minimum wage teaching guitar lessons) I got my first stereo. A big Marantz receiver and these big speakers called Ultra Linears. The speaks had 12" woofs and probably a complicated x-over consisting of a cap on the tweet. They had a blow up warentee which was good for a teen as I had the components replaced several times.

 

Then in the early 80's I met this sort of German mad scientist guy who was into speaker building. He showed me (and my bandmates) all about X-over components and calculating box sizes by the specs on woofs and such and we were amazed. So in the later 80's I took those old 70's cabs and decided to make a copy of the big 3-way JBLs that a local studio had. I gutted the old speakers, cut 3/4" birch plywood baffles and glued/screwed them on top of the old baffles and cut them out for 12" woof, 4" mid and 1" dome tweet. I had a Phillips book on speaker building and used one of their constant resistance x-over designs and just picked drivers that were very flat in the ranges I wanted to use them for. Also included L-pads for the mid and tweet.

 

Had these for years and years and there was just something not quite right about them although they would get loud. So got to reading recently and found that if you flush mount tweets and to an extent mids (woofs don't make nearly as much difference) it makes a world of help to the imaging and blending of drivers. I have also been intrigued with the ribbon and planer tweets which I had never heard before and been quite curious after the Adams came out.

 

So I routed for the tweets, mids and L-pad housings, kept my original 12" Eclipse woofs, Phillips sealed 4" mids and picked up a pair of HiVi planer tweets, replaced a bunch of tiny internal wire I had used (probably the only thing around at the time) and just generally tuned them. I was amazed I had the forethought back then to use crimp terminals which made my job much easier.

 

Fired them up and WOW, I'm amazed at how good they sound. All the problems with the ranges between drivers are solved with the routing I expect, made a world of difference.

 

The thing I really like is turned down low, they sound extremely flat and hi fi, but crank them and get back into the room and it sounds like you're in a fantastic sounding club or auditorium. Really big and all frequencies covered. I'd like to sort out how to mount them for tracking and mixing since all of a sudden they're alive!

 

Phil said: Do you plan on wall mounting them, or soffit mounting? If you're thinking of soffit mounts, it's a TON of work getting them correctly placed, the mounts properly built, etc. etc.

 

Well, that's the whole point of my question; I'm not sure. I think the big studio soffit mounting is fantastic but I have no idea how to sort exact placement and build the wall parts in my room. I've got the space and ability, but not the design know how. I might just put them up on stands for a time and experiment with placement.

 

How did you sort your's Phil? Those pics from Jeff's visit are fantastic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...