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Recording a track in mono or stereo...any general "rules?"


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Look, either we answer this poor OP's original question or someone write "Hitler" and we kill this.

 

 

HITLER! The OP's assertions are scaringly reminiscent of the Third Reich's plan to re-define how we heard speech and music, to the Aryan Standard, by ignoring all other input and contexts and asserting their technology as the ultimate standard. One of the more insidious plans was to outlaw the playing of a single instrument at any given time; e.g., any cellist caught playing solo at home was subject to arrest and torture, and any violinist playing in public for entertainment and/or money was immediately shot on site. ALL MUSIC was required to be performed at all times by more than one musician, thereby adhering to the standards of Der Zweihearen Fieldensurzen.

The OP is attempting to do nothing more than realize Hitler's dream. How can you not all see this?

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"And if you snore, would it be more effective to record you in mono or stereo?"


With any source, there are a number of ways to go about this.


The first quesiton is the arrangement: will the snore be by itself or in a dense mix.


If it is by itself, would the stereo ambiance of the room help the recording sound natural and vibrant? In that case a stereo recording would be useful. If the stereo ambiance of the room doesn't sound especially good, perhaps a mono recording technique would be better suited, in conjunction with some sort of reverb or delay added in the mixdown.


If the snore will be part of a larger arrangement, perhaps a mono recording would be easier to treat in the mix, as it will have less information to compete with all the other aspects of the arrangement. Would it be best to ensure that all the mix elements share a common acoustic space by sending them to a shared reverberation process? In that case, a stereo technique might be problematic, as the reverb could possible skew information in some stereo techniques.


Conversely, even if that snore is part of the larger mix, perhaps is shares a good sounding acoustic space with other elements of the mix. In that case, you might consider assembling a stereo recording of that snore along side other tracks of the other elements with the same stereo mics in the same stereo space, with the overall effect that a single performance has taken place.


These are all the considerations about when stereo recording techniques are appropriate, but that is typically how I go about thinking up an appropriate thing to do in that situation.



And if the snore is coming from the nose, is it one or two sources? One nose or two nostrils? Personally, I'd build a baffle to place between the nostrils gaining as much separation as possible. Then close miking each nostril, I'd pan 50% L 50% R. Not wide. But, then I'd add a distant coincident mic pair to get the room as well. Making this a true stereo mutimono near-far ambidextrous high infidel pre-Decca style recording.

But we all have our own ways of doing things. :idea:

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Hey WRGKMC


How do you record an acoustic grand piano?


/end thread

 

 

I used to have one years ago. I didnt have the best mics at the time but I placed a crown piezo on the floor below and placed a concencer about the same distance above with the lid open. Got some great sounds out of it even though I'm not a great player.

 

I have a minature upright I need to tune and replace a few hammers. I'm thinking about mounting several contact mics on the sound board ans mixing that sound with the miced sound to see what I get.

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