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What makes pinch harmonics easier on some guitars?


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Obviously a guitar with a stable neck and neck joint will have more overall harmonic resonance... combined with a solid bridge that doesn't kill the high frequencies.

 

Add CLEAN strings, good technique, and clear electronics that can pick up those higher frequencies... and ya got yerself a squealer. ;)

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My crappy bolt-on Dean V is very easy to do pinch harmonics on, they're a walk in the park. My Schecter C-1 Hellraiser FR, very hard. With a 22 fret neck i feel my hand automatically aligns itself with harmonic nodes when i pick making it easier (this might be just me). I find a maple bolt-on or neck-through neck are the best. Fixed bridges are better too. Pickups etc. doesn't matter, no problem doing them unplugged, it's just way easier on the cheapo basswood Dean than on the mid-priced Schecter.

 

just my $0.000002

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it's more in the amount of gain you use, your technique and how hot your pups are. i can pull pinch harmonics out of my ass on pretty much any guitar i've tried them on, regardless if i'm using a pick or not.

so get somethin high output like a super distortion or a JB and learn how to do them right and you'll be squeelin till the wee hours of the night.

rhyme. ha

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My crappy bolt-on Dean V is very easy to do pinch harmonics on, they're a walk in the park. My Schecter C-1 Hellraiser FR, very hard. With a 22 fret neck i feel my hand automatically aligns itself with harmonic nodes when i pick making it easier (this might be just me). I find a maple bolt-on or neck-through neck are the best. Fixed bridges are better too. Pickups etc. doesn't matter, no problem doing them unplugged, it's just way easier on the cheapo basswood Dean than on the mid-priced Schecter.


just my $0.000002

 

My friend's tele copy just squeals it self :eek: It has maple board too

Not sure about the body wood, but its very heavy

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I find it easier to do pinch harmonics on guitars with light and/or detuned strings.

 

I use 012s tuned to standard and find it hard to pull off those squealie, screaming pinch harmonics. I remember when I used 009s that I could do those all day without even trying.

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i can do pinch harmonics at almost equal volume on every guitar i own, which includes the classical and the 12 string.

 

but i have a rather unusual technique that involves the nail on my ring finger.

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I find it easier to do pinch harmonics on guitars with light and/or detuned strings.


I use 012s tuned to standard and find it hard to pull off those squealie, screaming pinch harmonics. I remember when I used 009s that I could do those all day without even trying.

 

+1. Me and my buddies (my band perhaps? not offically anyways) are playing a SRV cover so i had my guitar tuned down a half step. i started to play other stuff (and i was too lazy to tune back up) and i noticed the pinch harmonics were a lot easier down tuned.

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It's all technique really. There is something about one guitar or another that is throwing off your playing style.

 

It has nothing to do with gain, distortion or anything else of the sort. I can do pull off loud, clean pinch harmonics on guitars that are hot or clean, loud or soft, electric or acoustic. It's all technique. Gain and overdrive only make it easier to here weak pinch harmonics, and if they are weak, then they could have been played better.

 

Many people seem to find shorter scales help them, and I won't argue with that; but if they can do it on a 24 3/4" Gibson, they can do it on a 27" baritone, it just takes practice.

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It's all technique really. There is something about one guitar or another that is throwing off your playing style.


It has nothing to do with gain, distortion or anything else of the sort. I can do pull off loud, clean pinch harmonics on guitars that are hot or clean, loud or soft, electric or acoustic. It's all technique. Gain and overdrive only make it easier to here weak pinch harmonics, and if they are weak, then they could have been played better.


Many people seem to find shorter scales help them, and I won't argue with that; but if they can do it on a 24 3/4" Gibson, they can do it on a 27" baritone, it just takes practice.

 

Obviously technique is a huge factor but that wasn't the question. The original poster asked what guitars make PH easier. I definately find hot pickups more sensitive to artificial harmonics. I do agree with you that if you want to do them well, practice and technique development are number one. Since I rarely (read never) practice pinch harmonic technique because pinch harmonics aren't a part of my playing style and not important to me I can do them best with a lot of gain especially on a guitar with a hot bridge pickup. So to the original post, if you want to be proficient, practice, practice, practice and the guitar shouldn't matter.

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