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Benefits of Half Step Tuning?


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What is the reason for tuning down a half step? What gauge strings do you use? Are you singing? Tuning down a half step does help singers with a lower range.

 

I have a guitar thats tuned down but I adjusted the bridge and neck so the string tension matches my other guitars as closely as possible. This makes switching guitars during a set a non issue as they all feel about the same in terms of tension.

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I use ernie ball reg. slinky's, gauges 10-46. I play lead guitar in a reggae/blues band. I'm trying to get the most sustain out of the goldtop as possible. So i'm wondering if a lower action, maybe half step tuning or what will help?? Thanks for the help

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I'm gettin my Paul set-up soon and I was thinkin about having it set up to half step tuning. Are there any benefits -besides looser strings- to tuning down a half step? Thanks

 

are you a {censored}ty singer???

 

 

:D

 

personally i just like half step.....slightly lower than usual.

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There is a simple, but important, DISadvantage in tuning down. You won't be able to play with anyone, unless they are tuned down the same amount, or you use a capo, or you transpose the chords to a different (higher) key.

 

It's generally just not worth it. It's also harder to follow tabs, play along with recorded music, and so forth.

 

I know what I'm talking about. I play a B-to-B downtuned baritone regularly, and everything has to be transposed 2.5 steps (a fourth) up. Not that hard, but that's because I do pretty well transposing on the fly.

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I use ernie ball reg. slinky's, gauges 10-46. I play lead guitar in a reggae/blues band. I'm trying to get the most sustain out of the goldtop as possible. So i'm wondering if a lower action, maybe half step tuning or what will help?? Thanks for the help

 

If you switch to the Ernie Ball version of these strings, and tune down a half step, you may not have to change a thing in terms of guitar setup. I use 10-46 on most of my guitars, and have made the switch a few times to 11-49 by tuning down a half step. During the switch, you can learn some SRV songs so that the experiment will be time well spent. The tension of 11-49 down a half step seems to be very close to 10-46 at standard pitch. :thu:

 

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There is a simple, but important, DISadvantage in tuning down. You won't be able to play with anyone, unless they are tuned down the same amount, or you use a capo, or you transpose the chords to a different (higher) key.


It's generally just not worth it. It's also harder to follow tabs, play along with recorded music, and so forth.

 

Why couldn't you just tune up half a step when you needed to? :idea:

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I hear some vintage amps will explode if you try to play in Eb. :wave:

 

i used to play in Eb, but it gets annoying as hell when you're half a step down from your friend and can't jam or anything like that. if a singer can't handle that extra half step up to E, i say kick him out.

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Hendrix tuned down to compliment his voice at times, which probably is/was the most common reason to do so. But many guitarists, like SRV, realized it had an added benefit of allowing for thicker strings without too much tension.

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Some of hendrix's stuff is in E, and there are a few things in D; might be tape slowed down during mixing. It's not that hard to tune up or down, on the fly, to where you need to be; unless you have a locking bridge and/or floating trem. Learning to tune on the fly is good practice for your ears and in case of an emergency on stage.

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wow, thanks for all the input. lol, no i don't sing at all. we all have the same boss tu-2 tuning pedal so no worries about all being in harmony while half step down. told the guy to setup with half step tuning, so we'll see how she sounds!! thanks again everybody

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There is only one reason to tune to Eb. Saxophone.

 

And to prevent any harmonica players from stepping up to jam.

 

(And I speak as a semi-recovering harmonica player.)

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If you are going to tune down you might be better going down 2 semitones to standard D (DGCFAD). Then you can capo at the first fret to get Eb. It is also easier to transpose if you are playing with some-one in E (D=E, A=G, etc) in fact you can get some nice sounds because of the different chord / note voicings.

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I hear some vintage amps will explode if you try to play in Eb.
:wave:

i used to play in Eb, but it gets annoying as hell when you're half a step down from your friend and can't jam or anything like that. if a singer can't handle that extra half step up to E, i say kick him out.

:mad:

 

 

We second basses can't help that everything written today is for second/ first tenors. :wave:

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