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Most effective material to put on door/walls to keep sound IN?

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  • Most effective material to put on door/walls to keep sound IN?

    To practice/record at good volumes without driving everyone else crazy?

  • #2
    Stopping sound at the walls is a lot harder to do than you might think. You can try the usual 'hanging blankets' and such, but I'm not sure you'll notice a difference. A truly sound proof room is one where the inside of the room has no connection at all with the outside. In other words, you need a room within a room with a well insulated, continuous space in between the two. Obviously that's not practical for everyone.

    You might try getting amps and drums up on risers so that they don't couple with the floor as much. You can throw batt insulation in the interior walls and ceiling (again, not going to do a lot). Try not to let sound vibrate the walls and floor if you can. Don't expect much. Your best bet is probably just to turn down or find a different space if noise is a problem!
    The Signal Studio on MySpace

    Download The Shapes's EP + 4 singles, FREE (I play drums in this band)
    Download Fist Of God's EP, FREE (I play guitar in this band)

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    • #3
      nice gear Dan

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      • #4
        Cov,
        1st seal the door the best you can. then adding sheet rock (density) is the next thing to do. How much are you willing to do? You could build a room inside a room.This book is a great investment.
        http://www.amazon.com/Home-Recording-Studio-Build-Like/dp/1598630342
        Tim Mayock

        northfieldmusic.org
        would have been a minister if it wasn't for all the religion, Would have been a police man if it wasn't for all those laws, now just a good samaritan when i can

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        • #5
          a lot depends on how much you are willing to spend and how much soundproofing is "enough".

          a cheap, somewhat effective option is to grab carpet remnants out of the dumpster in the back of a local carpeting store. i have covered the inner walls of entire rehearsal studios with a pickup truck, a couple of trips to said dumpsters, and a nail-gun. note that this is not stealing, since they are going to haul these remnants away anyway, and most carpeting stores are happy to get rid of the stuff.

          the carpet will both absorb reflective sound (which is a good thing) and muffle the noise heard from the outside. i have even done two layers of carpet to get even more absorption. hey, it is basically free, so why not?

          this is obviously not a complete soundproofing solution, but depending on your needs may do the trick.
          .
          Listen, I know you're singing, you know you're singing, but the neighbors may think I'm torturing you.

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          • #6
            So I guess i disagree on carpet, blankets etc. what they do is cut down on hi frequencies bouncing around inside the room they will not stop sound transmission. put a loud sound source inside the room and listen from the outside. This is the best way to test.
            listen for where he sound is leaking. these are the things you can stop. Caulk and doors seals will help more.
            Tim Mayock

            northfieldmusic.org
            would have been a minister if it wasn't for all the religion, Would have been a police man if it wasn't for all those laws, now just a good samaritan when i can

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            • #7
              I would think that maybe taking a room, and laying in brick (no mortar) maybe caulking to seal the bricks. Do the floors and walls. I don't how you would approach the ceiling. Pads and carpets takes out high end. it doesn't remove the low frequencies. All I know is that you got to prevent the sound from hitting your framing and wood and transferring as a soundboard to other intended environments.

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              • #8
                The most effective material would be concrete as it's the density that stops sound transfer. If you practice in the basement you're halfway home. Unfortunately concrete walls and floors are very reflective and will lead to way too much echo and standing waves so you will need to treat the walls, ceiling, and floors with some sort of diffusing/absorptive material - carpet works for high frequencies, thick dense fiber glass or mineral wool with air gaps behind for lows. Check out Ethan Weiner's site http://www.realtraps.com/ for info on, and products to help you. There is also info for DIY.
                You will also want to isolate the ceiling the best you can. I've found that layering helps a lot. First, use bat insulation between the joists. Second, Sheetrock the ceiling. Next, caulk any and every gap between sheets and around edges. Then, install a drop-ceiling under the sheetrock. I've found that using rubber ties instead of the usual stiff wire to suspend the grid will help cut down on vibration and sound transfer between upstairs and downstairs. Lastly, install a auto door-sweep to the bottom of the door. When the door is shut tight it will force itself down to seal the gap under the door. It won't be 100% sound proof - but my family can sleep through drum and bass tracking even though their bedrooms are directly above the studio.

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                • #9
                  So I guess i disagree on carpet, blankets etc. what they do is cut down on hi frequencies bouncing around inside the room they will not stop sound transmission. put a loud sound source inside the room and listen from the outside. This is the best way to test.
                  listen for where he sound is leaking. these are the things you can stop. Caulk and doors seals will help more.


                  i have found through experience that carpet, especially a couple of layers, does have an absorptive effect as heard from the outside, especially when applied to lightweight walls, such as sheet rock.

                  acoustically, a single layer of regular carpet is roughly 15-20% absorptive, giving it only about a quarter of the impact of typical professional acoustic material, so while it obviously is less than ideal, saying that it will not stop sound transmission is misleading.

                  it is my understanding and experience that with two layers, you get something like 30-40% absorption, making it about half as effective as pro acoustic material. good enough for some applications, i think.

                  so as i said earlier, much depends on how much soundproofing is "enough".

                  if you want to keep the neighbors from complaining about sunday afternoon rehearsals, or keep the noise from the band next door from interfering with your rehearsals too much, then a couple of layers of carpet might do the trick.

                  if you want your kids to sleep through the night right above your studio while you track drums till 3am, then you obviously need a more comprehensive solution than hanging a few remnants.
                  .
                  Listen, I know you're singing, you know you're singing, but the neighbors may think I'm torturing you.

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                  • #10
                    Cov,
                    1st seal the door the best you can. then adding sheet rock (density) is the next thing to do. How much are you willing to do? You could build a room inside a room.This book is a great investment.
                    http://www.amazon.com/Home-Recording-Studio-Build-Like/dp/1598630342


                    1st How to seal the door?

                    2nd What's sheet rock?

                    3rd I don't have much space, could spend a few bucks but no space...

                    3rd Thanks

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                    • #11
                      I'm afraid that Dan is correct. There's little you can do short of a radical structural rebuild of your practice room.

                      In addition to the modest measures mentioned above, don't forget that HVAC ductwork is a great conduit for transmitting sound through a house.
                      Todzilla
                      HUGE sound generation & capture facility
                      Eno River Basin

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