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When its just you and your guitar(s)

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  • When its just you and your guitar(s)

    Hello Everyone, I am pretty new to HC but I've really enjoyed reading all these interesting posts.. I was curious about other peoples playing/practice routines. Myself, I lock myself in my man cave and plug in and play along with the music I enjoy. I am a "guitar george, I know all the chords. I dont wanna make it cry or sing" I really enjoy try to be the best rythm player that I can. Also wanted to share that my oldest guitar is an FG430 that I bought new and installed Fishman Prefix Plus preamp and piezo UST. Sounds beautiful. My inst. Goes thrugh fishman aura ast into Yamaha mixer and out to 4 Mackie studio monitors.Merry Chritmas

  • #2
    Hello & Welcome

    I know all the chords too. But I practise by playing both songs I've visited in the past and learning new ones. At any one time I usually have a couple of dozen songs - a mix of traditional and contemporary folk - that I can play and sing pretty much without thinking about it. Over time I drop a few and replace them with new ones. And my playing is not too fancy - I think of myself more as a singer who accompanies himself on the guitar rather than a guitarist who also sings.
    Howard

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    • #3
      I'm an overly developed chord-melody curmudgeon looking for other musical horizons. In other words I'm lost in it, without it and yet I'm over it. I left standard tuning, steel strings and worn out triads to explore open D with a plugged classical guitar. I'm a noob all over again and can say the challenge to an old dog is 3 equal parts of discipline, curiosity, and inspiration. Have the man cave, gear and enough time to have no excuses.
      - The urge to save humanity is almost always a false front for the urge to rule it. - H.L. Mencken

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      • #4
        I have more than a few acoustics, and will set up a couple of mics, and play through headphone.

        I'm not sure I know all the chords, but I know a lot of em.

        Playing guitar is a gift I have given to myself daily.

        _____________________________________
        Faith is taking the first step even when you don't see the whole staircase.

        Join Date: Aug 2001
        Location: N. Adams, MA USA
        Posts as of Jan 10th 2013: 82,617

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        • #5
          I've been playing around with guitar for almost 50 years now and have kind of fallen into two modes of play/practice. In the early evening while dinner is being prepared is practice time - I go off by myself to the music room and usually plug one of my two electric guitars in. I work on scales and chord forms - I'm trying to learn some jazz chords now so I'll just work on taking the basic triads and making the 6th or 9th or whatever, then moving it around the fretbiard. I definitely don't know all the chords. I might work on a new song or perfecting an old one, but its still practice.

          After dinnner i'll bring a guitar into the main room. My wife reads, I play. It might be any guitar and any music pretty much as the mood suits. We have no television, and since I can't sing whatever I play is some random fingerstyle something - blues or jazz or folkie stuff.

          Before I forget my manners, welcome to HCAG and thanks for starting the thread.

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          • #6
            Hi and Welcome to the Forum. I'm like Mikeo, I know a fair number of chords but far from all of them. I usually play after my wife has gone to bed, whatever the praise band is playing that weekend, whatever song I'm trying to learn, or whatever original I'm working on at the moment. Some scales but mostly just chords. I enjoy putting my own touches on stuff like playing an A6 for a straight A Major because there's an F# in the melody.
            Official HCAG “Theory-Challenged Hack”
            Member of the IBANEZ ACOUSTIC ASSASSINS
            Proud Member of The Alvarez Alliance
            Member of the Schecter Society
            Person-2-Person on the Web

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            • Voltan
              Voltan commented
              Editing a comment
              you just like F# ... (so do i)

            • DeepEnd
              DeepEnd commented
              Editing a comment
              True. That's why I like Gmaj7. But I also like making my rhythm playing more melodic. Another example would be adding an E to a D major (which is simple enough to do by lifting a finger).

          • #7
            I get up at 50 in the morning. The coffee is already waiting for me so I pour a cup and play for about an hour before it's time ot get ready for work. I have a list of about 50 tunes to choose from. Seems whenever I add a new one, one of the older ones drops off.
            I play fingerstyle in a few different tunings, but I don't sing at all.
            When I get home from work, I grab a quick meal and usually play some more as I listen to some of the talk shows on NPR.

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            • #8
              Welcome to Harmony Central wmjp.
              **********

              "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
              - George Carlin

              "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
              - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

              "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
              - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

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              • #9
                Aloha, and welcome!

                What's practice? Seriously, these days, I just pick up the guitar to work out new arrangements for the band, write, or record. I'll rehearse songs from the set I'm rusty on before a gig, but just sitting and practicing new technique doesn't happen. I have too many other things to do to just sit and practice stuff I don't need for the show, and I can make all of the necessary noises for that.
                http://thekiltlifters.com

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                • #10
                  i dont think ive really practiced since i started playing solo.. i spend a lot of time playing different instruments though, different steps but the dance is still the same...

                  welcome!
                  Last edited by Voltan; 01-04-2018, 09:44 AM.
                  Originally posted by isaac42;n32240445

                  Voltan is correct.

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                  • #11
                    Welcome!

                    Been playing and writing since '68. I just sit and play. My time is divided unevenly between learning my own songs, writing, learning covers for gigs, and learning to play dobro and mando. (I'm already as good as I'll get at guitar.)

                    PS -

                    Just curious: I notice you and several people answering say you amplify your acoustic guitars at home. Amplifying them on stage makes sense. But why at home?
                    Last edited by Delmont; 01-14-2018, 06:50 PM.
                    Del
                    www.thefullertons.net
                    ( •)—:::
                    Sent on my six-string jumbo ukelele

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                    • #12
                      I like to think that I'm technically competent to play and sing at the same time but lack the inspiration and motivation to even practice regularly. I've begun playing while livestreaming and have enjoyed getting feedback in realtime. It's giving me courage to get out of my comfort zone and inflict my talents on other people. The feedback has been generally positive and even the trolling is helping me to thicken my skin. What I've found particularly helpful has been to hit the red button with a set list and try not to strain my voice or do too much with my guitar playing.
                      Gear:
                      2013 Official Luthier's Forum Medium Jumbo (Western red cedar/mahogany)
                      2012 McKnight McUke (soprano ukulele, redwood/mahogany)
                      2010 Martin D-16GT
                      2006 Larrivee OM-03R
                      1998 Fender American Standard Stratocaster (natural ash finish)
                      1989 Kramer Stryker
                      197? Epiphone Texan FT-160N

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Originally posted by Delmont View Post
                        Welcome!

                        Been playing and writing since '68. I just sit and play. My time is divided unevenly between learning my own songs, writing, learning covers for gigs, and learning to play dobro and mando. (I'm already as good as I'll get at guitar.)

                        PS -

                        Just curious: I notice you and several people answering say you amplify your acoustic guitars at home. Amplifying them on stage makes sense. But why at home?
                        Because.

                        I mostly plug in with phones and listen to my mistakes. The phones don't lie and they amplify those mistakes much more clearly than the amp does. It's a way to hone my attack to make less noise, and as a finger picker the phones very quickly announce poor fingernail condition. On nylon strings that means a scrape-drag-release versus a clean pluck.

                        When I'm playing cleanly I'll switch to the stage amp and have a go with the vocals and guitar balance to get that down well, which changes with each song slightly because of the dynamic differences. With a classical guitar plugged in the strings are much less forgiving of noise than a steel string so it's best to play plugged.

                        Basically, though, straight up unplugged acoustic is now boring to me and has been going on a few years.

                        - The urge to save humanity is almost always a false front for the urge to rule it. - H.L. Mencken

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                        • #14
                          In the past I was content to just play at home unplugged but about 10 years ago I started playing in church and installed a K&K Pure Western mini into my Larrivee OM-03R. That was when I slipped down that slippery slope. At the time the VOM1T was a mainstay here and I found my recordings lacking. That's when I got my hands on a little Behringer mixer and began to play. Now I'm feeling proficient enough in playing and singing at the same and am in the process of plugging that mixer into my amp so that I can run a microphone. I'm hoping with just a little practice that I can finally land a small gig. In order to do that I need to figure out the mix and I'd rather have the lion's share of that headwork done away from an audience.
                          Gear:
                          2013 Official Luthier's Forum Medium Jumbo (Western red cedar/mahogany)
                          2012 McKnight McUke (soprano ukulele, redwood/mahogany)
                          2010 Martin D-16GT
                          2006 Larrivee OM-03R
                          1998 Fender American Standard Stratocaster (natural ash finish)
                          1989 Kramer Stryker
                          197? Epiphone Texan FT-160N

                          Comment


                          • Delmont
                            Delmont commented
                            Editing a comment
                            I have a K&K, too. It's for playing for an audience. It sounds pretty much the same as unplugged, just louder. And I don't need louder at home. My ears are about eighteen inches from the sound hole. I can hear it just fine.

                            I mean, if you can't hear the guitar on your lap, you either need hearing aids or a new guitar, right?

                            So tell me a little more about what you gain by amplifying at home.
                            Last edited by Delmont; 01-16-2018, 06:44 PM.

                          • kwakatak
                            kwakatak commented
                            Editing a comment
                            All guitars are not the same. I've noticed that my rosewood OM doesn't project as well as my mahogany dread. I also don't get the same experience as someone who is sitting in front of the guitar, so in a sense the amp serves as a monitor.

                            Also, I find that I am straining my voice if I am singing against the guitar. Admittedly, that means that I have to use a microphone and adjust the levels with a mixer but again this means that I get a better idea of what a potential audience is hearing. If anything, my voice feels better without having to be strained as much.

                        • #15
                          Originally posted by Idunno View Post

                          Because.

                          I mostly plug in with phones and listen to my mistakes. . . .
                          Why can't you hear them unplugged? I hear mine loud and clear.
                          Last edited by Delmont; 01-16-2018, 06:45 PM.
                          Del
                          www.thefullertons.net
                          ( •)—:::
                          Sent on my six-string jumbo ukelele

                          Comment

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