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Home made Les Paul

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  • #61
    too cool

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    • #62
      Awesome thread.
      Add Tag...

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      • #63
        Awesome thread.


        I agree, and it's re-inspiring me to finish my Willow, so I say thank you to the OP
        Signature...

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        • #64
          Sweet. You make this look easy but that is a lot of work great job so far


          Yeah, pretty much this. Beautiful work, and a tip of the cap to your skill and experience.

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          • #65
            Holy crap. Awesomeness. PLEASE continue. If you end up building your own tube amp from scratch after this, though, I'm going to have to sell all my tools and take up macrame or something. Not that there is anything wrong with macrame.



            Thinking about that, Knock. I don't own an amp so either my wife needs to give me a vintage Fender for Christmas or I'll have to make my own. Any good books on vintage tube amps?

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            • #66
              Sub'd!
              "Why, if we were all wiener dogs, our problems would be solved."

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              • #67


                .wow

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                • #68
                  Thinking about that, Knock. I don't own an amp so either my wife needs to give me a vintage Fender for Christmas or I'll have to make my own. Any good books on vintage tube amps?


                  Oh, man... Forgot I am talking to an engineering type. Of course you're going to have a whack at it. If you decide to go the route of mere mortals, though, I love my Blues Junior...

                  http://www.amazon.com/Guitar-Amplifier-Handbook-Understanding-Amplifiers/dp/087930863X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1321035894&sr=8-1

                  http://www.amazon.com/Design-Construction-Tube-Guitar-Amplifiers/dp/0615291805/ref=sr_1_6?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1321035971&sr=1-6

                  http://www.amazon.com/Tube-Amp-Book-Revised-Hardcover/dp/0879307676/ref=sr_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1321036027&sr=1-7

                  http://www.mojotone.com/

                  http://www.tubesandmore.com/
                  I guess I kinda lost control, because in the middle of the play I ran up and lit the evil puppet villain on fire. No, I didn't. Just kidding. I just said that to help illustrate one of the human emotions, which is freaking out. Another emotion is greed, as when you kill someone for money, or something like that. Another emotion is generosity, as when you pay someone double what he paid for his stupid puppet.I.K.F.C.E.S.C.Potato SocietySAWG

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                  • #69
                    You're making fast progress on this.

                    You mentioned that you like the hot rod truss because of how thin it is at 7/16ths. If you like that you'd love the allied luthery truss at 3/8th deep. That and its 1/4" wide so you can use a standard router bit.
                    http://acapella.harmony-central.com/...nother-guitar.

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                    • #70
                      You're making fast progress on this.

                      You mentioned that you like the hot rod truss because of how thin it is at 7/16ths. If you like that you'd love the allied luthery truss at 3/8th deep. That and its 1/4" wide so you can use a standard router bit.


                      There is a bit of a time warp - I didn't want to start the thread until I knew there was a reasonable chance of sucess.

                      I've only built two guitars with the adjuster at the headstock - both Gibson copies. I considered bringing it into the neck pickup cavity - would be a bit of a hassle to adjust but most of my guitars have only needed the t/r tweaked every few years. I've used the hot rod on several of my builds - I really like a double acting rod and all I had to do for the adjuster was shift the router fence a 1/16 or so when I was doing the channel

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                      • #71
                        OP this is amazing! Your skill is very admirable. I never knew until recently that guitar necks are chiseled by hand, always thought a machine did it.
                        My weapons of choice:

                        -Eastwood Joey Leone Signature RBC
                        -Washburn AG20CE Acoustic-Electric
                        -Line 6 Flextone III Plus

                        Those that inspired me and continue to motivate me to play everyday:

                        Jeff Healey, Shinedown, Steve Vai, Doug Aldrich, Paul Gilbert, Andy Timmons, Zakk Wylde

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                        • #72
                          Just in case you need more encouragement to continue, I now give it. These are my favorite threads.

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                          • #73
                            OP this is amazing! Your skill is very admirable. I never knew until recently that guitar necks are chiseled by hand, always thought a machine did it.


                            Back before there were machines they were all done by hand. Commercial manufacturers use cnc milling machines, not just for necks but bodies, acoustic bridge, usually inlay - which is fine, you get identically the same thing every time. I kind of enjoy the carving aspect, however I've got to admit the buggered up my first neck pretty badly (is was so chunky that I ended up stripping the finish off and taking a spoke shave to the completed guitar).

                            Its kind of ironic, I work in a fabrication shop where I have access to cnc mills, turning centers (fancy lathes) and a cnc laser cutter. I often use them to make templates, but never to cut the wood. There is just a real pleasure in working with a sharp chisel or plane and a block of beautiful wood.

                            As luthier Frank Ford said, "before I let that cnc drive me down I'll die with a chisel in my hand, Lord Lord..."

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                            • #74
                              Someone at another forum asked what I was going to do with the headstock. I know Gibsons are traditionally some sort of light wood (holly?) that is painted black. Frankly that kind of offends me - I love the look of wood and grain and usually I try to tie the headstock in with the rest of the guitar. Most of the time I try to match the body wood or maybe the top if it is something like koa. I considered three things here - maple to match the top, mahogany to match the back or rosewood to tie with the fretboard. Decided to go with the rose, that would give a dark color in keeping with the Gibson theme

                              I've also kind of standardized on inlaying my initials in the headstock - just the K if there isn't much room or and F and K if there is a little more real estate. I like to buy my pearl pre cut from Andy DePaule, that way the letters are all the same. At the same time I bought the fretboard markers - plane old squares of pearl. The letters are five bucks each, the fretboard was 40 total



                              First lets put the markers in the fretboard. I laid out the positions working from diagonal corners of both the board and the pearl - located the centers of both and marked the perimeter with both an Axacto knife and pencil



                              Using a small bit on a Dremel in a router base I removed the wood, cleaning up edges and corners with a chisel



                              I glue the pearl in place with epoxy mixed with a little bit of rosewood dust, that will fill any small gaps. The pearl is flush in the center and stands a little proud at the edges because of the fretboard radius



                              Clamp it down with waxed paper under the caul



                              and when the epoxy sets, sand the pearl back with a radiused sanding block



                              Lets do one more thing to the fretboard and bind it. There are two ways to bind a board - after it is fretted with the binding over the ends of the frets (thats the Gibson way) and before fretting - the ends of the frets are on top of the binding. Thats the way I like to do it so we'll put the binding on now. There are several glues used with plastic binding - Duco and WeldOn are two popular ones, some people use CA and you can also desolve binding in acetone. I'm using Duco here, it slightly softens the plastic



                              What I have done there is clamp two pieces of wood to the bench at the angle of the fretboard, glue the binding on and slip it into the Vee. A little down force and it tightly clamps the plastic to the wood.

                              OK, lets put this away until tomorrow when we'll work on the headstock

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                              • #75
                                Tomorrow is here, so lets finish with the headstock. Drilled out the access hole for the truss rod adjuster and glued the rosewood veneer on the neck



                                Drilled the tuner holes at this time - I did that at work where I have a drill press ("honey, can I.....")

                                I stick the pearl letters on the rosewood with double sticky tape, scribe around them with an Axacto knife and color the wood with a pencil just like the fretboard inlay. Route out the cavity with my little Dremel



                                Test fit the inlay. Lately I've been cutting the F and K apart and interlacing them



                                Same trick with epoxy with a little rosewood dust, look like hell when its done, but the idea is to fill any little gap with the mixture



                                Looks a lot better when its been scraped back

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