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Isn't an AB/Y switch pedal similar to a summing amp pedal?

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  • Isn't an AB/Y switch pedal similar to a summing amp pedal?

    JHS Pedals Summing Amp

    https://www.musiciansfriend.com/ampl...51834000000000

    Old Blood Noise Endeavors AB/Y Switcher Pedal

    https://www.musiciansfriend.com/ampl...53298000000000

    An AB/Y switcher pedal could be a summing amp too like the JHS Pedal linked above, right?
    https://www.rakuten.com/r/CHICHI1336...edium=raf_link

  • #2
    yeah, except most a/b-Y pedals can go two to one, or one to two...
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    Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally used up and worn out, shouting '...man, what a ride!'

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    • #3
      Originally posted by samal50 View Post
      JHS Pedals Summing Amp

      https://www.musiciansfriend.com/ampl...51834000000000

      Old Blood Noise Endeavors AB/Y Switcher Pedal

      https://www.musiciansfriend.com/ampl...53298000000000

      An AB/Y switcher pedal could be a summing amp too like the JHS Pedal linked above, right?
      I'd need to see the schematic (or a gut shot) of each pedal to say for certain, but technically an active summing amp isn't the same thing as a passive AB/Y switching pedal, although if it has the right resistors, an AB/Y can be used "in reverse" and act as a resistive mixer and sum two signals, although with some signal loss; an active summing amplifier also combines or sums two signals, but can be designed and wired in such a way as to do so without a voltage drop since they include an operational amplifier (opamp) as part of their circuit.



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      • #4
        Originally posted by daddymack View Post
        yeah, except most a/b-Y pedals can go two to one, or one to two...
        A Summing Amp is just 2 to one, NOT one to two then?

        I would assume an A/B Y Pedal would be more advantageous than a summing amp because I think it can be a summing amp as well, technically? 2 to one IS "summing", right? So is an A/B Y Pedal a summing amp in disguise that's more versatile?

        Here's an overview of the summing amp:

        OVERVIEW

        Mix two sources into one to create a tone bigger than both.

        The JHS Pedals Summing Amp gives you the ability to take two inputs and blend them into one output. Simply plug into the two marked inputs and then plug in your single output and you’re ready to go. From two signals, the Summing Amp creates one mono signal.

        This is perfect for putting effects in parallel so that they are not affected by one another. The Edge used this technique in the '80s with his delays. When you have a quarter-note delay and a dotted eighth delay, and you place them in parallel, then sum them back together, the effect is that both delays come through more clearly and are not “delaying the delays." This can also be used with overdrives so that they are not pushing each other as in series, but sit atop one another in parallel. Another use is combining fuzz and compression in parallel so the fuzz isn’t getting choked by the compression.

        The Summing Amp gives you the ability to use effects together in completely new ways that you may never have imagined and can open up new and inspiring sounds with your old effects. This simple little box takes two inputs and creates one output but it adds up to a whole lot more!
        Last edited by samal50; 05-09-2019, 10:12 PM.
        https://www.rakuten.com/r/CHICHI1336...edium=raf_link

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        • #5
          like Phil mentioned, the Summing Amp has an op amp to prevent signal degradation and balances both channels to an equal 'summed' signal, whereas the A/B-Y combines the two without any boost or cut. I have used my A/B-Y both ways over the years: combining two signal chains [one dry, one with effects] and as a signal splitter to drive two amps from a single source [good on large stages for monitoring purposes with small amps], which also allowed me to try a dry vs effects laden signal chain to separate amps.
          "We are currently experiencing some technical difficulties due to reality fluctuations. The elves are working tirelessly to patch the correct version of reality. Activities here have been temporarily disabled since the fundamentals of mathematics, physics and reason may be incomprehensible during this indeterminate period of instability. Normal service will be restored once we are certain as to what 'normal' is."

          Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally used up and worn out, shouting '...man, what a ride!'

          "The greatness of a man is not in how much wealth he acquires, but in his integrity and his ability to affect those around him positively" ~Bob Marley

          Solipsism is the new empiricism. -Alan Burdick

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          • #6
            the A/B portion simply lets you select between two inputs or connected in reverse, splits a signal to one output or the other.
            The Y portion you have to be careful. If you used a mono in then used the A/B portion to select one amp or another, then select both in a Y configuration, you'd probably be OK because you're only connecting the amp inputs.

            If you try and combine active signals from pedal outs in a Y configuration then there would be any buffering. The pedals wouldn't simply combine, the output of one pedals can feed into the output of another pedal in the wrong direction. Getting a balance between the two pedals running in parallel may not be possible without buffers.

            An ABY is often used for a player who switches instruments regularly. he can leave both instruments connected then simply switch between one or the other. The Y portion wouldn't be of much use however. if you turned the volume off on one instrument you'd attenuate both because the pots are in parallel to each other.

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