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I plugged 18v of power into a 9v pedal

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  • I plugged 18v of power into a 9v pedal

    It's good it didn't break. Is this coz the power supply was designed not to break pedals with the wrong power running into them ? It was my boss dd-20 digital delay. maybe if I plugged something else it would have broke ?

  • #2
    I'm gonna guess pedals have a tolerance window and probably won't fry instantly. I think I read something like that here.
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    • #3
      Originally posted by 1001gear View Post
      I'm gonna guess pedals have a tolerance window and probably won't fry instantly. I think I read something like that here.
      I won't do it again. I'm lucky it didn't break.

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      • #4
        You're lucky it didn't fry - overvoltage can do that if the pedal isn't designed for it.

        However, SOME pedals are designed to run on anything from 9-18V. But before you plug a higher voltage power supply in, make sure you have read the manufacturer's recommendations regarding the allowed voltage, and especially the power supply type (AC or DC) and the plug polarity - get any one of those three things wrong and it can potentially mean a fried pedal.

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        • #5
          I'm surprised the 18V plug was even the same size. I know most 12V units use a different sized jack and pin size to prevent accidents.

          The Center pin hole needs to match the center pin on the pedal and the outer circumference needs to be right to activate the jack switch.
          He may not have done any damage because the jack is the wrong size and never made the proper electrical contacts.

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          • #6
            Some 'universal' power adaptors have selectable voltage levels and switchable polarity as well as several different plugs to fit a variety of different devices. I don't recommend using such adaptors.
            "Isn't it a pity, isn't it a shame,
            how we break each other's hearts
            and cause each other pain"

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            • daddymack
              daddymack commented
              Editing a comment
              those typically are not well isolated, and generate all sorts of extraneous noise and hum. Great to power a can opener..guitar pedals not so much.

          • #7
            Originally posted by onelife View Post
            Some 'universal' power adaptors have selectable voltage levels and switchable polarity as well as several different plugs to fit a variety of different devices. I don't recommend using such adaptors.
            Like Daddymack said, using one of those is typically a recipe for noise, hum, and general unreliability. Like you, I'd recommend against using them.


            **********

            "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
            - George Carlin

            "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
            - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

            "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
            - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

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            • #8
              But nothing happened to the boss dd-20. I plugged it back into 9v and it was working. great!

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              • #9
                Originally posted by mbengs1 View Post
                But nothing happened to the boss dd-20. I plugged it back into 9v and it was working. great!
                That's because BOSS pedals include polarity and over voltage protection. Most modern pedals do.
                This space left intentionally blank.

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                • #10
                  You'll have to go quite a bit higher than 18v to do any damage to the electronics but 18v will push most electronics into clipping/distortion. One pedal company ships with 18v to give their pedals more head-room and they work on most 9v pedals I've tried.
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                  • #11
                    I'm sure my Joyo power supply has some feature in it protecting pedals from this case. coz it's silly to break pedals this way.

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                    • #12
                      Originally posted by mbengs1 View Post
                      I'm sure my Joyo power supply has some feature in it protecting pedals from this case. coz it's silly to break pedals this way.
                      NO, it's really silly to do stupid, and NOT pay attention to what you are doing.
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                      Some of my guitars: 64 or so Domino Beatle bass; 73 Ibanez 2398; 79 Epiphone Genesis; 79 Manoman; 99 Ric 330; 78 Gibson L6S; 95 Ibanez JS-700; 04 Samick Lasalle JZ3: 05 Ibanez AS73; 81 Paul Custom, 07 Gary Kramer Simulator T and about 50 others.

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                      • #13
                        Originally posted by mbengs1 View Post
                        I'm sure my Joyo power supply has some feature in it protecting pedals from this case. coz it's silly to break pedals this way.
                        A power supply would have a difficult if not impossible time anticipating if an arbitrary pedal can handle 18 volts or not.
                        There's no device identification/arbitration buss involved here... the PSU simply supplies a voltage to a pedal, up to the current limit of that PSU.... the pedal's functionality (literally, it's operational input voltage impedance) is what determines the current.

                        If the pedal starts to fry (goes into overcurrent scenario), the PSU may have a crowbar circuit that stops output on that line, but it is only a response to the immolation of the pedal and is there only to prevent the PSU from going up in smoke as well. In that case, the pedal is probably toast.

                        If the pedal's normal operation demands a current level over/above that which the PSU can output, a couple things could happen.
                        A decent PSU should have an over-current sensor with a shut-off circuit built in.
                        In some cases/designs, the PSU might attempt to provide the current demand, but at a lower (saggy) voltage.
                        The PSU might reach an over-temp condition and hopefully there's a sensor and shut-down for that.... otherwise expect smoke from the PSU.

                        The bottom line is:
                        The PSU will not typically 'protect the pedal'. It cannot sense if the supplied current or voltage is damaging the pedal vs whether the pedal is a high-current-demand device (think : a big Strymon).

                        There are more scenarios that can play out, but rarely in the pedal's failure.
                        As Phil pointed out, it is incumbent upon the Player to have checked with the pedal manufacturer and make sure that a proper voltage at the proper current-capability is provided to the pedal.

                        You wouldn't want to put 18 volts on a Klon...the vast majority of Klon/klones use a step-up DC/Dc convertor that will go up in smoke if given more than 11 volts... here again, there are devices that can handle 18 volts, but they are more expensive and pedals need to economize on parts to have an acceptable price.
                        ...besides, if all pedals were made to be safe up to 18 volts, then someone would complain that they fried one at 24 v.

                        Blind Doc Jones' Pickles....Cures What Ails Ya

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