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So camera guys, what are you shooting these days?

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  • So camera guys, what are you shooting these days?

    They are saying that the DSLR's day are over because mirrorless is the new trend, but dang it, I have a bazillion good lenses for the DSLR and I'm not going to quit anytime soon. In fact, I'm eyeballing a new Nikon D500. So who are 'they' and why are they doing this to us?
    Currently own a D750 which is pretty sweet in it's own right.

    What cha running?? and phoast some pics.

  • Grant Harding
    replied
    Galaxy S10 🤓
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Grant Harding; 06-04-2019, 02:14 AM.

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  • Dr. Tweedbucket
    replied
    Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post

    You're welcome - and it also looks like you're in luck - Optolong makes a clip-on UHC filter that is designed to work with your D750...


    https://agenaastro.com/optolong-uhc-...iABEgL-rPD_BwE


    I've done business with the folks at Agena Astro several times - they are a very good vendor.

    A UHC filter plus a motorized tracking mount, along with your existing camera and lenses (and maybe a laptop and some decent astro-software) would give you a very capable DSLR-based astrophotography setup IMO.
    Awesome! That's good to know, maybe it won't be that pricey overall. Once I get my setup figured out, I'll just have to find a place out away from town. I am sort of out in the country as is, but still there are too many lights all around, especially to the west. Maybe I'll go camping out in some desolate town out west .... I'd love to take a road trip and do this kind of thing. It's amazing all the shooting stars you can see once you get out there in the middle of nowhere. Thanks again for the links!!

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  • Phil O'Keefe
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr. Tweedbucket View Post
    I have a 127/145th size camera, will that work? I can probably duct tape the filter on the end.


    It sounds like to do it right I need some pretty snazzy gear but I can probably buy a tracker and filter and use my beater Nikon D750 for starters. Thanks for the info, it can sure save some time in sorting this stuff all out.
    You're welcome - and it also looks like you're in luck - Optolong makes a clip-on UHC filter that is designed to work with your D750...


    https://agenaastro.com/optolong-uhc-...iABEgL-rPD_BwE


    I've done business with the folks at Agena Astro several times - they are a very good vendor.

    A UHC filter plus a motorized tracking mount, along with your existing camera and lenses (and maybe a laptop and some decent astro-software) would give you a very capable DSLR-based astrophotography setup IMO.

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  • Dr. Tweedbucket
    replied
    I have a 127/145th size camera, will that work? I can probably duct tape the filter on the end.


    It sounds like to do it right I need some pretty snazzy gear but I can probably buy a tracker and filter and use my beater Nikon D750 for starters. Thanks for the info, it can sure save some time in sorting this stuff all out.
    Last edited by Dr. Tweedbucket; 05-29-2019, 06:30 AM.

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  • Phil O'Keefe
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr. Tweedbucket View Post
    Yeah, thanks. Actually, I would like to know what works the best for you (trackers/filters and even lenses you're using) if you have product names or model numbers. Otherwise I end up plowing through user reviews and wondering if they are true reviews or biased.
    My main astrophotography camera is a ZWO ASI 294 MC, which is a 4/3 format camera. I also have the Canon 1000D, which is a APS-C format DSLR, and while I have the adapters needed to connect it directly to my telescopes, I normally don't use it with them, and use the ZWO instead.

    Optolong makes a really good UHC filter that isn't too expensive - at least compared to other really good UHC's. Mine is in 2" format (again, for telescope use), but they make them in sizes that will fit directly on a DSLR too. Since a good UHC filter (and there are some poor ones out there too, so you have to be careful...) allows only the main astronomically-important wavelengths (the H-a, OIII, H-beta, SII, etc.) to pass through while blocking a lot of the light pollution wavelengths caused by man-made neon signs and street lights, they can really help give you better contrast and much better color detail. That would be the first filter I'd recommend looking into for taking nighttime photos of the sky.

    https://www.optolong.com/en/products...and-filter-uhc

    If there's anything specific you're thinking about getting or wondering about, please feel free to drop me a PM and ask...

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  • Dr. Tweedbucket
    replied
    Yeah, thanks. Actually, I would like to know what works the best for you (trackers/filters and even lenses you're using) if you have product names or model numbers. Otherwise I end up plowing through user reviews and wondering if they are true reviews or biased.

    Leave a comment:


  • Phil O'Keefe
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr. Tweedbucket View Post

    Yeah, that's probably the ticket. I've seen telescopes with them which is almost mandatory considering on how fast things move out of frame.
    I have motorized / tracking Alt-Az mounts for both of my telescopes - they let me take upwards of 30 second exposures, which I then "stack" via software to increase the signal to noise level and bring out the finer details. Someday I might move up to a really nice tracking equatorial mount that would be useful for extra long exposure times (several minutes or more), but they start at around $1,500 for one that would hold my largest telescope and go up from there...

    Anything longer than a second or two of exposure time is going to start to give you star trails, even if you are just using a DSLR and a regular lens, and not attaching it to a telescope. While star trails are generally something you want to avoid with astrophotography, they can look pretty cool themselves - especially with really long exposure times.


    That moon shot was 300mm @ F8 / 1/500 sec. I don't know why I was thinking longer exposure, but it was pretty snappy I guess.
    The moon is so darned bright that you really have to stick with short exposure times and limit the aperture. Again - very nice job!


    That particular zoom lens isn't all that sharp at 300mm, so I really probably need a 300mm prime for a good shot and those are only a couple grand, no problem
    Yeah, my 70-300mm is best when it isn't pushed to the limit. But then again, it's just the cheapest one Canon offers.

    Here - look into one of these for use with your camera:

    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...era_mount.html

    Or maybe one of these...

    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/used/...&lsft=BI%3A514

    Or even one of these...

    https://www.telescope.com/Orion/Orio...20mount%20dslr

    Any of the three should allow you to take 30 second to even a couple minute long exposures without star trails.

    If you're on a really tight budget, this can work too... but it's harder to set up and use. It requires manual tracking - the others are all motorized mounts.

    https://www.telescope.com/Orion/Orio...20mount%20dslr


    A couple of good filters would also allow you to bring out some color in some of the interstellar gas clouds, planets, etc. and also would keep issues due to light pollution minimized - I'd look into a good UHC filter first, then maybe a H-a filter. Let me know if you'd like specific recommendations - I spent a small fortune on trial and error attempts before finding the gear that actually works well for me... I might be able to help save you some of that aggravation.

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  • Dr. Tweedbucket
    replied
    Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post
    Tweed, what you want / need is a decent tracking mount that will compensate for the rotation of the earth and allow for longer exposure times without the star trails. I’ll try to get you some suggestions in a bit...
    Yeah, that's probably the ticket. I've seen telescopes with them which is almost mandatory considering on how fast things move out of frame.

    That moon shot was 300mm @ F8 / 1/500 sec. I don't know why I was thinking longer exposure, but it was pretty snappy I guess. That particular zoom lens isn't all that sharp at 300mm, so I really probably need a 300mm prime for a good shot and those are only a couple grand, no problem

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  • Phil O'Keefe
    replied
    Tweed, what you want / need is a decent tracking mount that will compensate for the rotation of the earth and allow for longer exposure times without the star trails. I’ll try to get you some suggestions in a bit...

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. Tweedbucket
    replied
    Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post
    That's very nice!
    Thanks, if I remember right it was like a tight aperture like F11 or maybe even more and for some reason I remember a slower shutter speed of a couple of seconds. I looked it up on YouT0ob and picked the most logical sounding video and it worked. It was with a crappy Nikkor 70-300 consumer lens F3.5 to F5.6 I think and using either a D750 or D7100.

    My problem in the past was just shooting at the moon and even through I could focus like single point right on the moon, the exposure would read some of the black sky outside the moon and then blow out the highlights.

    I want to do some bigger stuff eventually like what you are doing, but only with a DSLR. I know that on longer shots you can get streaks from the rotation of the earth so somehow you have to keep the shot under so many seconds. And then there is the atmosphere to consider like humidity, wind, dust and all that stuff. It's fun to experiment though.

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  • Phil O'Keefe
    replied
    That's very nice!

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  • Dr. Tweedbucket
    replied
    Here is shot of shootin the moon.

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  • nice keetee
    replied
    Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post

    No, but I've taken a selfie of... nevermind.
    use what we have
    makes a joyous noise

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  • Phil O'Keefe
    replied
    Originally posted by nice keetee View Post

    you ever take a selfie on the moon?
    No, but I've taken a selfie of... nevermind.

    Leave a comment:

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