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Where do you think you're going when you die?

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  • zookie
    replied
    Well what gives me the heebie-jeebies isn't the idea of whether or not there's anything after death; it's the idea that one could come to welcome death.

    The idea of being so sick, so exhausted, so alone, that in the end-game, you wouldn't mind dying - that's what terrifies me.

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  • MDLMUSIC
    replied
    When I was a kid, my dad gave me this advice....

    "Son, don't worry too much about your problems. What's the worst that could happen? You'll either live or you'll die. If you live, OK, no problem. If you die, you'll either go to heaven or hell. If you go to heaven, OK, no problem. And if you go to hell, you'll be so busy shaking hands with all your friends, you won't have time to worry."

    Good old dad, always put things in perspective.

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  • Smilin' Bob
    replied
    I'm with Bill and Koiwoi - when you're dead, that's it. Someone asked me if I wasn't afraid to die. I said said no, because being dead, I won't be around to experience anything.

    I do fear the process of dying, and hope I will go out fast in a massive stroke or the like. If the process is drawn out and painful, death will likely be welcomed.

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  • lazaraga
    replied
    i believe that matter/energy is neither created or destroyed. the matter/energy that "i" am composed of will go on existing in other forms. hopefully i will leave some positive inertia that will benefit the rest of existence.

    peace

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  • Bloozcat
    replied
    I think it's nearly impossible for humans to conceive of complete nothingness. Just try to imagine no thoughts, no consciousness, no next step. Our minds are wired to always expect what's next. Emptiness can't possibly compute in our minds. It's sort of like trying to imagine and end to the vacuum of space. What would be out there? A brick wall that says, "Space ends here"? What's on the other side of the wall?

    I know there are many who won't believe this, but we were created to expect something more...a continuation of something.

    As to blaming God for "condemning" souls to Hell; it's not God who does it, it's we ourselves who make the choice. Blaming God may be convenient, but God did give all of us free will to choose. So, if God has a blueprint for how we are to attain heaven and we ignore or reject it, who then is to blame? Certainly not God, but we ourselves.

    All I know is that I'm not about to live in eternity separated from the God who has given me so much to be thankful for. I believe in His plan, and I trust in His word. He's never let me down.

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  • Danocoustic
    replied
    Originally posted by gagnon


    SGV,
    I have never had a near death experience so as to come back an expert on the things I may or may not have seen on the other side. However, I have had experiences of what I would consider to be spiritual in nature that have led me to identify with born-again Christianity. These have been enough to convince me of the truth of the Bible, which has a lot to say about heaven itself and what it is like. The Bible doesn

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  • gagnon
    replied
    Originally posted by ShesGotVerve
    And while I'm at it and before I go to bed, what about this Heaven thing? If there really is a "Heaven", is it an interactive kind of place or just a state of being or something else?


    SGV,
    I have never had a near death experience so as to come back an expert on the things I may or may not have seen on the other side. However, I have had experiences of what I would consider to be spiritual in nature that have led me to identify with born-again Christianity. These have been enough to convince me of the truth of the Bible, which has a lot to say about heaven itself and what it is like. The Bible doesn

    Leave a comment:


  • jumpduck
    replied
    Where do you think you're going when you die?


    Whatever's usable will be used, the rest goes in the ground to start a worm farm.

    What happens to my consciousness? Ah, we'll see, I suppose.
    I figure, if there's something beyond, wow, a new adventure, and one I wasn't counting on. If there's not, it won't matter much since I'll be, ya know, dead and all.

    I've known some remarkable people in my life, and it would be cool to think I'll see them again. But I ain't counting on it.

    Leave a comment:


  • sonrise
    replied
    To be with my Lord and Saviour in Glory...

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  • Andrewrg
    replied
    Originally posted by ShesGotVerve


    Is this actually what Einstein postulated? I wasn't familiar with this theory. Interesting.

    Well if you extend the assertion that since the big bang created all the matter in the universe,and that it is always going to exist,even if reconstituted into something we may not recognise as"matter",then yes.
    I`m not sure if this is connected to relativity.
    As Marilyn Monroe once said to him at dinner,"I hear you work with your relatives".

    Leave a comment:


  • ShesGotVerve
    replied
    Originally posted by Andrewrg

    If Einsteins theory is correct then we will still be around-as molecules of matter with no consciousness.


    Is this actually what Einstein postulated? I wasn't familiar with this theory. Interesting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Andrewrg
    replied
    The whole issue over fear of the unknown/fear of dying/what happens after is a byproduct of centuries of christian brainwashing which has permeated our culture.
    Superstition-nothing more or less.This is from those good people who taught you that a virgin was screwed by a ghost,remained a virgin and produced a child.Hmm.
    If Einsteins theory is correct then we will still be around-as molecules of matter with no consciousness.
    All the matter in the universe has always existed and always will-we truly were born of stars.
    If you want to make yourself useful after death get buried and have a tree planted above you so you can fertilise it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Grant Harding
    replied
    Originally posted by daddymack




    Worrying about an eventuality over which we have no control is pointless.


    My thoughts exactly.

    Spend energy changing what you CAN change, so that when you're road kill you've actually contributed to the advancement of our species. I think death will be a relief, because living is hard work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Grant Harding
    replied
    Heavy stuff... I ain't no expert:

    I believe that when I kick the bucket the only thing that physically remains are the atoms that made up my body, all of the junk that I've managed to hoard, and any genetic material that I happen to pass on to unsuspecting offspring.

    I believe that my "spirit" remains as the influence that I've had on other people and things during my brief existence.

    Due to these beliefs, I don't believe in "clean-slate" forgiveness. Once you do something, the effect of that action exists and will remain as part of your legacy.

    Leave a comment:


  • FingerBone Bill
    replied
    I actually do think that when we die there is nothing.

    It affects me the opposite of SGV - I find the thought of oblivion quite comforting. All our problems in this life just don't matter in the long run. We'll just blink out like a snuffed out candle and nothing will exist for us ever again.

    Now that's what I call eternal rest.

    On the other hand - if there is an after-life I hope it comes with guitars and we can all play like Tommy Emmanuel.

    Leave a comment:

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